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Flatwounds on a Fretted??

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by savagelucy, Jun 4, 2002.


  1. savagelucy

    savagelucy

    Apr 27, 2002
    Canada
    hey,
    At the end of this summer I am going to get a new bass (finally!!) and I've been thinking about putting flatwound strings on my good ol' Squier. I have a few concerns about this:

    Are flats harder to play on fretted compared to fretless?

    Will they sound good?

    and is it worth putting them on?
     
  2. maidenfreak

    maidenfreak

    Feb 13, 2002
    Omaha, NE
    I have flatwounds on my fretted P-Bass. I really dig the sound. I've never played fretless, so i wouldn't be able to compare that way.
     
  3. malibu

    malibu Guest

    Dec 26, 2001
    regular flatwounds like Chromes are no problem on a fretted bass - can't think of any reason why would they be.

    but what about black nylon tapewounds on a fretted - is that maybe what you meant ?
    I bought a set of Fender 9120 black nylon tapes for real cheap a while back -
    but wasn't thinking at the time about how the frets would just cut/destroy the tape quickly -
    still wonder how the sound will deteriorate after that happens so it might still be an experiment for some future year,
    unless someone here has already tried that.
     
  4. FunkySpoo

    FunkySpoo Supporting Member

    Feb 6, 2002
    but what about black nylon tapewounds on a fretted - is that maybe what you meant ?
    I bought a set of Fender 9120 black nylon tapes for real cheap a while back -
    but wasn't thinking at the time about how the frets would just cut/destroy the tape quickly -
    still wonder how the sound will deteriorate after that happens so it might still be an experiment for some future year,
    unless someone here has already tried that. [/B][/QUOTE]

    I've had the black tape wounds on mine for over a year and the frets haven't done any damage to them. They sound great to. Very smooth and very very deep If you want to know what flats on a Fender sound like listen to anything recorded in the 60's especially by Motown
     
  5. malibu

    malibu Guest

    Dec 26, 2001
    really ??
    thanks alot swingbass - I felt sorta dumb a short while after buying these figuring they'd get very short/minimal use.
    so I have the day job off today and now I know what I'm doing this afternoon -
    if these Fender 9120 black tapes last me until Christmas I will be amazed !
     
  6. savagelucy

    savagelucy

    Apr 27, 2002
    Canada
    i was thinking more of getting the Chromes or nickel.
    whats the difference between these?
     
  7. Try the Fender flats, duno the model, I think its 9950, but Im not sure, its the stainless steel flats, cheap and they sound great. I actually love them a lot.
     
  8. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA

    Flats are actually a little more comfortable on the skin of the fingers, so that would make them easier to play, but then again, they tend to be higher tension, so that would make them harder to play?

    Doesn't matter if your bass has speed bumps or none. Once the bass is set up for the new strings, you won't notice much of a difference except in how your fingers slide on the strings.


    They'll sound like flats. Less bright. Sort of a swelling, round tone. Good? Certainly different. Good is subjective. I personally really like the sound of flats on a P. Don't care for them at all on a jazz bass.

    Worth it?

    Well they aren't that expensive. Seems like a fun $20 experiment to me. If you don't like them, a TBer will probably take them off your hands for the cost of postage.

    Chas
     
  9. misterk73

    misterk73

    Apr 11, 2002
    Flagstaff, AZ
    I played rounds for years and finally put some flats on my fretted Hamer Cruisebass (Jazz-style) a few months back. I doubt I'll bother with rounds again. I love the feel of flats -- sleek and fast. I love the sound of flats -- very thumpy, very warm. (My bandmates agree.) So far, Fender stainless steel medium lights are my favorites.
     
  10. I want to put flats on my fretted 4. I use it mostly for slap and a few non slap songs and i use a 6 for most everything else. I really like the sound of flats on fretted basses but i was wondering if i would still get weird (or bad) slap sound. Any recordings you can recommend with a fretted with flats? I dont want to waste $20 on strings and find out i cant slap them.

    BTW, i dont want flats on the 6 and cant slap it nearly as well as my 4.
     
  11. I have TI Jazz Flats on both my RB5 and my MIM P. My MIM J fretless currently has Fender 9050M stainless flats. I picked up a set of D'Addario chrome flats to try on the fretless.
     
  12. savagelucy

    savagelucy

    Apr 27, 2002
    Canada
    sweet, i think i will pick up a set of the fender flats once i get my new jazz bass.

    p.s. does steve harris use flats on his p-bass?
     
  13. p.s. does steve harris use flats on his p-bass?

    Yep, he's got a signature set of Rotosound flats. I've been playing my new (to me) P bass with a set of TI Flats and so far I love it. Enough high end to give nice definition, but plenty of thump also.

    Mike
    Dude's Roadie.
    Standard disclaimer here, I work for a Roto/TI dealer, but I was playing TIs well before that. Yada yada yada...
     
  14. Bongolation

    Bongolation

    Nov 9, 2001
    California
    No Bogus Endorsements
    If nothing else, flatwounds are easier on your frets (and fingers) than stainless steel roundwounds.

    That matters a lot to me because I have good basses I don't want to destroy for purposes of resale, particularly the vintage basses I use.

    Besides, a vintage bass should sound like a vintage bass, and that means flats.
     
  15. savagelucy

    savagelucy

    Apr 27, 2002
    Canada
    flats are probably no good for slap, right?
     
  16. misterk73

    misterk73

    Apr 11, 2002
    Flagstaff, AZ
    You'll definitely get a different sound slapping with flats, but they are fine for slapping. I'm hard-pressed to think of too many recorded examples, although I know Me'Shell NdegéOcello has been known to slap with flats...
     
  17. steve2

    steve2

    Sep 23, 2001
    Piney Flats, TN
    I have Chromes on my J bass but will probably go to Fender 9050's ML next go around.

    I don't believe that flats are good to slap. But for a good thumping string there are no better than flats. I don't understand it I can go to a small local music store and they will have about 6 kinds of bass strings and all are roundwound. I still don't know what to put on my Peavey T-40 I bought last week. Probably Flats.

    steve
     
  18. oddentity

    oddentity

    Nov 20, 2000
    Philly
    I just had TI flats put on my P-bass... and it has never played or sounded better! They are the perfect strings for this bass, imho...
     
  19. misterk73

    misterk73

    Apr 11, 2002
    Flagstaff, AZ
    I didn't mean to imply that flats are the ideal choice for slapping.

    If slapping is your primary style, then I think it's safe to say that rounds should be your string of choice. If, however, slapping is something you use sporadically, for effect, flats can get the job done. As always, the exact sound you get is going to be created via the interaction between your strings, bass, pups, amp, etc.

    For me and my setup, I find that flats work fine for slapping (thumbwork). The popping can be a bit thin-sounding without help from one or more FX, but it's passable.
     
  20. savagelucy

    savagelucy

    Apr 27, 2002
    Canada
    cool, my p-bass won't be slapped to much after i get my j. My squier's slapped sound is kind of crappy anyway:rolleyes: