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Flea - What bass?

Discussion in 'Bassists [BG]' started by patrickroberts, Dec 28, 2000.


  1. patrickroberts

    patrickroberts

    Aug 21, 2000
    Wales, UK
    I was wondering what is Flea's typical bass, you know what type does he generally use?
     
  2. Erlendur Már

    Erlendur Már

    May 24, 2000
    He used to use Stingray basses, but he uses now Modulus Flea bass
     
  3. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Although, these are his two "live" basses, the sounds you hear on records are probably different - Alembics have been mentioned and his latest signature bass doesn't sound anything like the tone on the records.
     
  4. I'm pretty sure that he used the Modulus Flea bass on Californication (tone like an MM Stingray but with more high mids) , at any rate Rick Rubin (producer) said he used just one bass- but he used an Alembic Epic and a Stingray on One Hot Minute, and a Wal and a Stingray on Blood Sugar Sex Magik.
     
  5. Atrax

    Atrax

    Dec 27, 2000
    Early stuff, I believe, was on a 2-band stingray - then he got a few more like alembics & stuff and ended up with a three band Stingray live. A lot of californication is on the modulus bass, which came out around the time he did 'kettle whistle' with Janes Addiction, so I assume he used it on that too....

    The modulus Flea bass got great reviews - carbon fibre neck which *apparently* you can lay betwen two chairs and stand on without damage (UK Bassist magazine review, i think)

    if I'm wrong, fine. this is recollection, since all my Bass Mags are in the UK and I'm not.

    j
     
  6. VictorLeMonteWooten

    VictorLeMonteWooten

    Dec 6, 2000
    I heard that flea owns a 62 precision too. I wish i had all the basses flea had.
     
  7. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Yeah, but who cares how strong it is, if it doesn't sound any good!
     
  8. "The modulus Flea bass got great reviews - carbon fibre neck which *apparently* you can lay betwen two chairs and stand on without damage (UK Bassist magazine review, i think)"

    actually that referred to the Vigier Excess bass, with the 10/90 graphite/wood neck , as demonstrated by Roger Glover.
    you probably could do the same to a Flea bass without it breaking- there was also a report in Bassist that Flea had smashed his original Modulus, and the neck had survived and was to be fitted to a new body, so you'd have a hard time destroying one, Bruce!


     
  9. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Yes but I don't buy basses for their durability, but rather for the fact that they sound and play well!! ;)

    Actually, this means these necks are probably the most "un-environmental" (non bio-degradable?) objects on the planet! :)
     
  10. Hey Bruce "Yeah, but who cares how strong it is, if it doesn't sound any good!"

    You'd care if you were stuck on the wrong side of a very deep canyon, being chased by a team of axe-wielding psychopaths (who didn't like nice sounding basses) and the only way to cross was by walking over the neck of your bass?

    HA!

    I have to agree, why do you need an indestructable neck - maple has been perfectly OK for over 50 years?

    Also, if you were to smash up your bass on stage (as a budding rock star obviously) you'd look like a right tit if you couldnt break it!!
     
  11. I remember a salesman in the Bass Cellar in Denmark Street, London telling a customer that the Steinberger he was demonstrating was fireproof up to about 2000degrees centigrade- useful if you live near an active volcano, I suppose.

    "Also, if you were to smash up your bass on stage (as a budding rock star obviously) you'd look like a right tit if you couldnt break it!!"
    - didn't that happen to Nicky Wire at the MSP millenium gig, when he struggled to smash his Fender Jazz?
    maybe he needs to get a polystyrene bass made.
    (some people would say that he'd get the same sound out of it.......):D (his basslines are OK on record, but he does make a mess of them live).
     
  12. I think he's used three different basses, a vintage (I dunno what year, but I think victor was right when he said '62), then a Musicman Stringray, and the Modulus Flea bass
     
  13. Here's the list

    Fender w/one pickup, like the Squier Bronco (anything before Uplift Mofo)
    Ernie Ball Stingray(Uplift Mofo Party Plan, Mother's Milk)
    Spector + Stingray (BSSM) Still, the stingray live
    Wal + Alembic + Stingray (OHM)
    Modulus Flea Bass + Fender 62 or 66 Jazz (Californication)

    there...whew
     
  14. Well Bruce if Californication is anything to go by it sounds good to me!;) BTW Wherabouts are you gigging at the moment?
     
  15. ytsebri

    ytsebri

    Sep 1, 2000
    Dallas
    If your bass had been in a fire, or had to travel in an aircraft hold from one temperate zone to another, you'd care. Wood necks have the tendency to twist, turn, and bow over a period of years. Some are worse than others, depending on the conditions in which it was played. Graphite and/or composite necks don't do that. Ever. That's a very big plus. In 60 years, you can pick up a wooden neck bass and probably be able to hunt baby elk w/ it and some arrows. When you pick up a Modulus or Zon in 60 years, the neck will play as though it were brand new. :)
    That's why it matters how strong/sturdy the neck is.

    [Edited by ytsebri on 01-22-2001 at 10:18 PM]
     
  16. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    What about the problems that Modulus and Status have had with necks warping?
     
  17. greater stability, more sustain, no deadspots are all good arguments in favour of graphite necks, but if a bass had been in a fire, I'd leave out any possibility of ever playing it again- I don't think the wooden bodies on Zon and Modulus basses would stand up too well, and even a toasted all-graphite Steinberger wouldn't exactly be a player's treat with melted pickups and charred frets.:)
     
  18. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    i'm sold on ZON graphite necks...rarely needs tuning...and setup?!?! HA!!!!!!!!!

    i own a fender too, it has its moments as well.

    fred
     
  19. Flea also uses a Taylor acoustic on Road Trippin
     
  20. ytsebri

    ytsebri

    Sep 1, 2000
    Dallas
    A fire in a house doesn't necessarily burn up basses. I had a warehouse fire about 3 years ago and it destroyed alot of equipment. My drummer's drums (cymbals and all) and my rig were toast. The guitar players' stuff wasn't burned. However, when the fire dept. showed up and decided to flood the area with water, it was a different story. I personally only stored my amps where we practiced, but one of my guitarists had a guitar there. When we got there the next day, (only a day mind you) the water had had a chance to soak through the nice supple rosewood fretboard to the neck. It was extremely bowed because of the excessive moisture and tension of the strings. He had to trash the neck and buy a replacement. That's what I mean about being in a fire. :)