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Floppy Speakers

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by GrooveSlave, May 28, 2003.


  1. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    A question for the group:

    Do drivers wear out after heavy use over prolonged periods or do they just get broken in?

    I recently acquired a new Eden 210xlt to go with the old one I had. The new one was quite new - less than a year old. The old one has probably 600 gigs on it according to the guy I bought it from 2 years ago. (price was great).

    When I compare the 2 cabs, I can see that the old drivers move a lot more than the new ones in response to the same note. Is it time to recone?

    Thoughts? Advice?
     
  2. tripwamsley

    tripwamsley

    Jan 31, 2002
    Sulphur La,
    Things made by man wear out. It may be time to replace them.
     
  3. Is the impedance the same on the cabs? The 210XLT comes in both 4 and 8 ohm versions.
     
  4. I haven't had the best experiances with Eden drivers...maybe I just push 'em to hard or something but the three cabs I had started to get "floppy" after about two years of casual use; maybe a gig a month, practice twice a week. An Eden re-cone isn't cheap neither.
     
  5. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    Yes, they are both 8 ohm cabs. Good question.
     
  6. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    Speakers do indeed break in. My cab-design research led me to an article which discussed how T/S parameters are measured. Part of the article described how measuring a new speaker that hasn't been broken in can produce some very inaccurate figures.

    If the speakers needed a re-cone, you'd hear it distorting. Either that or it wouldn't make any noise at all.

    I say wait and see.........
     
  7. I would assume that the mechanical damping mechanism would loosen up a bit after several hundred hours of use. As long as it still sounds good, I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  8. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    Thanks for the responses. It sounds great. I'll wait until I hear audible badness (!?) before reconing.
     
  9. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Canuck Amateur

    Hey Groove Slave,

    Good questions re your old and new cones. In audiophile circles, it is well known that new stereo speakers can take quite a while to break in. Speakers are known to need anywhere from 24 hrs playing time to as much as 300-400 hrs to get to full excursion back and forth. The speaker surround when new can dampen the forward and rearward movements of the coil and cause it to move less.

    The "floppy" speaker is probably actually moving more air (louder) than the newer "tight" speaker. You may have heard speakers compared to "motors", and the more they move, the better they work (to a point).

    I think that you'll see the newer one loosen up in time and be more comparable to your older cabinet, assuming of course that they have the same transducers in them.
     
  10. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    Hey eadg,

    Thanks for the response. That makes sense. It may be wishfull thinking but it sure seems that the new one sounds better than the old. But, together they sound awesome. I have not taken the time to A/B the cabs, but I should do that soon.

    Overall, I can't get over the effect of adding a second 210. It's way more than twice as good.

    Wheeeeeeeeeeee! :bassist: :D
     
  11. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Canuck Amateur

    Hi GrooveSlave,

    After some more thought on the matter, especially your comment that "the new one sounds better" I say, trust your ears. If you say the new 210 sounds better, it probably does.

    The new cabinet may very well sound better than the older one due to many factors. My comment referred to how cabinets with identical speakers would sound before and after break-in. We've assumed that because the cabinet model is the same, the speakers are identical and that may not be the case.

    Manufacturers will often change interior baffling, insulation material and interior dimensions of ports, plywood material, crossover components, number of fasteners etc. that would be hard to see from the outside of the cabinet. Production runs may differ from one to the other as well.

    Also, speaker manufacturers are constantly making improvements to the actual transducers like cone material & thickness, windings in the coil, coil diameters, quality levels of individual components like the basket, magnet, formed parts etc. which can all significantly change the performance and sonics of a speaker over the model's lifetime, even if the model designation doesn't change. It's a complex electro-mechanical assembly for sure.

    Kinda makes it hard to do 'apples to apples' comparisons doesn't it.
     
  12. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    A week ago i would have disagreed with you eeyaydeegee. But I recently found out that one of my 2 "identical" amps was fitted with the new and improved pre-amp section. The result was 2 different sounding amps and a response from the manufacturer that indicated that no-one was supposed to notice. So yep, it's possible Eden made a subtle change somewhere along the line. But good luck finding out for sure. I keep hearing that they're not returning emails. The takeover seems to be taking a while.

    Either way, if it sounds good, it sounds good!