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floppy strings

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Fishbrain, Sep 14, 2001.


  1. Fishbrain

    Fishbrain

    Dec 8, 2000
    England, Liverpool
    Endorsing Artist: Warwick Bass and Amp
    oke, on my new bass the strings are quite loose where I normaly would play on any other bass. Not so loose they hang down or anything just a bit to loos for my liking. So I can play (plucking hand) as fast as I normally would, so I move closer to the bridge (or nut I dunno) furthest to the end away from the headstock. and that really hurts after a while. Is there anything I can do??
     
  2. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Yeah, you shouldn't be forced to play by the bridge. Not a lot of big tone or sustain happening there.

    Your solution may be some hex core strings in a thicker/heavier gauge than what you're currently using. DR Lo-Riders are a prime example.

    Not only gauge, but thicker core strings will always give you a tighter feel. String maker's website often describe their cores. For instance, DR doesn't use a single design.

    Also, are you tuning to a reference, like a tuner or an in-tune piano? You using dropped tuning on a 34" scale or less? Some lower end, 34" or less scale basses just can't handle dropped tunings.
     
  3. Fishbrain

    Fishbrain

    Dec 8, 2000
    England, Liverpool
    Endorsing Artist: Warwick Bass and Amp
    i'm using standard tuning and is the only way to thicken my strings coz i really like this gauge???
     
  4. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    I don't know which gauges you're using, (.045-.105???...pretty standard), but thicker cores or hex cores could be your answer.

    Just using basic common sense, a thicker core wire is less flexible than a thinner core wire, right? Also, the thicker string core offers more resistance to tuning, so more pounds/kilos of tension are required to get the string in tune......voila! That's why thicker core strings, not thicker strings, will feel tighter.

    Although the cores are larger, the gauge of the strings doesn't have to increase.

    If you're thinking about a hexagonal/hex core string, Rotosounds are probably easily available to you. But if DR's aren't hard to get, you ought to try the Lo Riders. I think DR uses thicker cores...at least they felt tighter to me.
     
  5. Look i debated for awhile if this should be moved. I figured maybe the string problem could've been related to a poor setup, but it hasn't headed down that path yet. I'll try this in strings, if it turns out a setup mish, then bring it back, i'll tag and release this one mmkay!

    :)

    Merls
     
  6. If it's mainly your E that's loose, you could try a tapered string set (usually only the E is tapered I think). Else, I can't think of anything else but changing your gauge.
     
  7. Fishbrain

    Fishbrain

    Dec 8, 2000
    England, Liverpool
    Endorsing Artist: Warwick Bass and Amp
    tapered? does that mean the E is shorter or am I a dork?
     
  8. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Fish - This ought to make it clear

    [​IMG]

    If you ask different people in the string business which is best and why, you'll get different answers.

    Some say tapered makes for better intonation and note articulation.
    Some say a string has to be of equal diameter end to end are some notes won't be accurate
    Some say because tapers have less mass over the saddle, they tend to slide sideways.
     
  9. Fishbrain

    Fishbrain

    Dec 8, 2000
    England, Liverpool
    Endorsing Artist: Warwick Bass and Amp
    and what would you say, Rickbass?
     
  10. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    I never paid a lot of attention to it, but I suspect it has more to do with the design of the saddles' slots combined with the gauges of your strings.

    Just a guess, but that could be why there is never a consensus. For instance, those who find tapers work better may not consider that the people who say they don't work better are using different gauges and bridges than they are.

    Have you ever heard Entwistle live using his conventional design Rotosounds? Intonation and articulation certainly never seemed to be a problem for him. Same with Marcus Miller and his DR's.

    I find Hipshot bridges are very forgiving. I've used tapers and big old gauges of conventional wounds with a Hipshot, and both designs work fine. I never tried tapers on my comparatively junky, stamped metal, Fender bridge. But tapers may not work so well as the bass was made long before the taper design ever appeared.

    Lile most things about the instrument, you just have to find what works for you.
     
  11. Fishbrain

    Fishbrain

    Dec 8, 2000
    England, Liverpool
    Endorsing Artist: Warwick Bass and Amp
    thanx dude, ure da man
     
  12. seamus

    seamus

    Feb 8, 2001
    Jersey
    DR Lo riders are a little higher in tension, maybe they could help. They have a hex core which makes for a stiffer string.

    They're also very good strings and sound great. Only thing I would caution on is they are stainless, so if you are used to nickel strings, they might feel a little rough. Also, stainless will sound bright at first when compared to nickel. I've tried a lot of strings, and Lo Riders are the tightest I have found.
     
  13. Nickle Lo-Riders are available as well.