Fodera wooten strings

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by superbassman2000, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. i am seriously considering getting these strings. is there any *good* reason why i should not get these? i'm not looking for things like, "you know, you won't sound like wooten" i am aware of that...i really don't have much experience with different strings, i only have used d'addarios, fender, and TI strings, and i want to try something different. i figure they aren't that bad of a deal for 25 bucks...

    btw, do they break easily? i play with somewhat of a hard attack, and have been prone to breaking a string here and there, which is why i don't really buy expensive strings...i got a set of rotosounds for 40 bucks, and i used them for 3 weeks until the d string broke...rats...

    but i digress...

    is there a really good reason as to why i shouldn't get these strings?

  2. buddahbass


    Dec 22, 2004
    Pittsburgh, PA
    well, if you have a hard attack, these strings might not last that long. i'm pretty sure his sigs are a lighter gauge. check out lots of good strings cheap!
  3. I have the Fodera Wooten sigs in Medium gauge on my Cort Curbow 4.

    Personally, I like them, but not as much as I like Dean Markley Blue Steels or Dean Markley Super SR2000s.

    They're really versatile, though I don't much like the feel of them. (Could be because I like steel strings, though ;)).

    As for breakage, can't really vouch for that. (Sorry!) Haven't been playing my Curbow much recently.
  4. mothra2

    mothra2 Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2006
    Those strings come in standard AND lighter guage....NOT just lighter gauge. If you paid 40 for 4 string Roto's you got robbed!
    Love Roto's though, and love the VW Nickels as well. As for breakage...
  5. Meatrus


    Apr 5, 2009
    Could something be wrong with the bridge? I think you should be able to smack away at it (the bass! :eek:) without worrying about the strings. I have been smacking away for a while (again....:eek:) and have never broke a string.
  6. I put a 5 string set on my Lakland 55-94.
    Love'em and will buy again.

    Just before these I was using some La Bella Slappers and had intentions on trying a few other sets, but really haven't bought any others as of yet.

    If you've tried the Slappers here is my comparison.
    Two totally different sets of strings.

    The La Bella's were a regular gauge set with lots of tension and the Fodera VW set is mid gauge set. The tension feels very comfortable to me, and I really didn't miss the feel of a bigger gauge. Tone wise, the La Bella's had a thicker lower mid fullness to them where the Fodera set seems to accentuate an upper mid crispness. Both are very full sounding regardless of the difference in gauges.

    A reason not to get them? I say try as many different sets as you can. I once was in the school of "strings are strings" and use to buy D'addarios, too. Now I believe strings can be a real personal choice where one set might be the bees knees to one player and total crap to another.

    One thing I can't help you on is the breakage issue. I have a light touch when playing, but will dig in when I need to be heard. Haven't had an issue yet, but I can't say I've ever broken a string either. The only negative thing I can only assume for a hard player is these string do have a lower tension feel to them. I am able to easily set up a buttery low action with them. You may have to set up your bass to accommodate the lower action/feel.
  7. Just Thumpin'

    Just Thumpin' Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 7, 2008
    NE United States
    Manager and Partner, Fodera Guitars (as of 10/14/09)
    The Vic Wooten Signature strings only come in one gauge for each 4 and 5-string sets -- 40/55/75/95 and 40/55/75/95/120. The other very big difference between these and ALL other current Fodera string sets is that ALL wraps of the Vic Wooten strings are nickel (the core is still stainless steel) compared to most other manufacturers' and Fodera's other nickel sets which only have an outer nickel wrap (over stainless steel).

    This makes them a much more supple feeling string (players that play hard might say the combination of light gauge and all nickel makes them "sloppy," but those with a light touch tend to love them), and allows for better bends, it also alters their sound slightly, but I am not even going to try to describe that...BTW, making an ALL nickel string is more expensive than using nickel for the outer warp only...