Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Ford is starting to get it...

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Trevorus, Oct 23, 2005.


  1. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    They are starting to make a lot more hybrids, and also bio-fuel capable vehicles. Now if only we can get changeover kits and such for existing vehicles. My Saturn could be really nice running on ethanol. BTW, diesel is hugely expensive here. More than a dollar more than gasoline. it's nuts.
     
  2. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Diesel is 80 cents more a gallon here last time I looked.

    brad cook
     
  3. NJL

    NJL

    Apr 12, 2002
    San Antonio
    We just got our first ethanol pump in San Antonio....may be the first in Texas...surprised Austin didn't get it first.
     
  4. AuG

    AuG

    May 22, 2005
    Fort Collins, CO
    I saw regular for $2.65 here yesterday, and diesel was $3.65. I thought diesel was easier to refine than regular unleaded? Why is it so much more expensive?


    AuG
     
  5. because it lasts longer.... ;)
     
  6. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Diesel is more expensive because there's more of a shortage. After the hurricanes gasoline imports increased to make up for refinery losses, diesel didn't increase. Therefore, there's a shortage.

    brad cook
     
  7. buzzbass

    buzzbass Shoo Shoo Retarded Flu !

    Apr 23, 2003
    NJ
    TPA material
     
  8. You don't need to change anything in diesel cars to let them run on biodiesel, so there's no need for "conversion kits", just more biodiesel pumps.

    Btw, is diesel really that much more expensive? I was considering buying a VW jetta/golf diesel in the future... 42mpg sounds appealing, but not if the fuel's that much more expensive.
     
  9. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    I have seen some of the new Ford's, nice. I'm not going to get rid of my '90 F-250 though. Maybe that mentality is contributing to the problem..... :rollno:

    -Mike
     
  10. I believe that some diesel vehicles require modifications to run on biodiesel, especially in colder climates (like where I live). Some will run on it off the shelf though. I don't believe that these are engine modifications, though.
     
  11. Basschair

    Basschair .............. Staff Member Supporting Member

    Feb 5, 2004
    Stockton, Ca
     
  12. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Actually, I have heard of people using a little bit of gasoline in their diesel to keep it from gelling up in the cold. They also mentioned easier starting. I'm sure the same could be applied to bio-diesel. Filtering all the solids and gunk out of McDonalds friers to use as fuel may become a crime, though... I mean, cutting into profits and all...
     
  13. RicPlaya

    RicPlaya

    Apr 22, 2003
    Whitmoretucky MI




    because a tractor trailer holds 300+ gallons of fuel at one time compared to the 15-20 gallons a car holds.
     
  14. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Thing is, hybrid cars are great and all, but they aren't really for saving money on gas, not yet at least. Typically hybrids are selling for a couple thousand more than their gas engine counterparts, so rather than saving money on gas at the pump, you're basically just paying for 2-4 years of gas upfront. Then you start to see a turnaround in your money spending.

    Economically, hybrids are investments, and they are fairly future-proof, because, well, they are the future, for as long as the car will likely last at least.

    The best reason to support hybrid cars, imo, is less the economics/fuel/efficiency/pollution reasons, and more the technological reasons. The Prius for example, it gets a respectable 30-50 MPG on average depening on a variety of factors. More than most any car(in real world use), but what's REALLY neat about it, are all the gizmos, the onboard computer, built in speaker-phone, auto-dimming rear view mirror, bluetooth enabled, keyless entry and ignition...etc.

    Technology that is being developed for and implemented with hybrid cars is/will push forward the development of all automobiles and in theory make everything more sweet in the future.

    But yea, gas prices are a bitch, though they've been slowly inching downward a little lately. Could be worse ya know?
     
  15. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
     
  16. Basschair

    Basschair .............. Staff Member Supporting Member

    Feb 5, 2004
    Stockton, Ca
    +1

    A lot of people don't realize that the cost difference in saving on gas versus paying car payments may not ultimately be worth it. Though there is the group that are (or claim to be) doing it for the environment and to lower demand on gas, thereby saving a limited resource.

    I commute about 62 freeway miles a day, which costs me about $1,620 a year just for the gas to drive to/from work. That's at about 25 to 26 mpg. IDEALLY, in a hybrid I'd be getting 45 to 50 mpg on the freeway, which at most will cut my costs in half. Of course, if I got a teaching job in town, I'd be commuting at the most 20 miles per day, which would be ROUGHLY $540 per year. So, rather than save on gas money (yet pay more for a car payment), I should probably just get a different job...sucky.

    Oh yeah, Ford is slowly but surely getting better. I sincerely doubt it's out of a concern for the environment or to save their customers on gas money. Rather, they've seen their bottom line shrink and are just trying to find a way to compete with the Japanese companies who have higher-efficiency cars on the road. Either way, I don't care: it's about time.

    btw: what does "TPA Material" mean?


     
  17. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    TPA material means Tin Pan Alley. A place here on TalkBass for supporting members to discuss political subjects.

    Yeah, I know Ford is just trying to compete with the Japanese companies, but I think that is a good thing. I think it will help our economy in the long run, as well as creating some more jobs. Also, American built technology is a good thing. Japan has been excellent with electronics for a long time, and you can see in the music world how older boss effects that were made in Japan are worth more. But using the auto industry's kicking it into gear and getting working on good modern technology is a boon for America's electronic nerds like me. Also, if we can develop our own electronics industry through this, it could make for less expensive non-imported electronics.
     
  18. What sort of temperatures are you talking here though? I'm talking about the not uncommon -40 (the crossing point of C and F) that we get up here. Diesel here is fine in the winter with the additives in it for cold weather, but I understand that biodiesel gels more easily than diesel fuel (as would be indicated by many of the conversion kits containing heaters for the fuel tanks).
     
  19. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    I wasn't sure about where bio-diesel turned into solids. But, once it starts to come into mainstream use, i am sure they will find an additive or a way that allows it to stay liquid at lower temps. Perhaps ethanol (freezing at -114 C) could work... I'm not sure, as I am not much of a chemist.
     
  20. Basschair

    Basschair .............. Staff Member Supporting Member

    Feb 5, 2004
    Stockton, Ca
    Ah yes...gotcha.



    Hey, I'm totally with you on that. It seems as if our economy is really taking a wrong turn here, and independence from oil in general (not just foreign) would be a good thing in the long, long run. Of course, GM companies are still putting out far more gas-guzzling, powerhouse cars than efficient models. Yes, I do love the fast cars, but I also love not going broke filling the tank. Now, if our auto-makers would just put out some models that I like, I'd buy American.