1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Fourths voicings bass chord lesson

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by HaVIC5, Jul 19, 2008.


  1. HaVIC5

    HaVIC5

    Aug 22, 2003
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Hey all, just posting another lesson of mine on my developing chord concept for bass guitar. Since Todd Johnson hasn't officially unveiled his grips system material yet, I've been going ahead and creating my own, and its worked pretty well so far. Here is my latest one using what I call the "stacked fourths" system.



    Comments/questions?
     
    MEKer likes this.
  2. This is cool - I am going to PM some comments.
     
  3. onlyclave

    onlyclave

    Oct 28, 2005
    Seattle
    You have some dirt on your chin, dude.

    Great concepts. Do you have pdf files of these you could post?
     
  4. HaVIC5

    HaVIC5

    Aug 22, 2003
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Yeah, I watched the video this afternoon, and said to myself, "dude, *** are you thinking" and then promptly got rid of it.

    No pdfs yet - I don't often commit things to paper, but I probably should. I'll work on that and get back to you.

    Honk'n down low brought up a point via PM that this video isn't very friendly to those who aren't jargon-filled, or don't have a good grasp on chords/scales yet. So you've been warned, although there's plenty out there that will get you up to speed.
     
  5. Cool video, some great info in there!
     
  6. mutedeity

    mutedeity

    Aug 27, 2007
    Sydney
    I am just wondering if you might explain technically how stacked 4ths sounds like a Maj7 chord? What are the functional implications that would allow it to be used as a substitution? Personally I don't hear how Gsus47 sounds at all like GMaj7, for example.
     
  7. HaVIC5

    HaVIC5

    Aug 22, 2003
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Well, notice that I wasn't doing strictly diatonic fourths. I was just doing perfect fourths straight down, and then adjusting notes which didn't quite fit as a method of creating voicings. If I was doing diatonic fourths, then I'd have a lot more of a "modal" ionian sound. So I wouldn't have a Gsus4maj7 chord, because the sus4 doesn't work with the chord sound of a major 7 chord. I would start with the chord tone of a major 7 chord at the top, in this case presumably the 7, then spell 4ths down from there. In this case, F# C# and G#. The C# might not work over a major 7 (#11 is somewhat unstable, although entirely possible) so you bump it up to D, and G# definitely doesn't, so you sharp it and get an A. You then have the voicing F# D A. This contains all notes that "work" with the sound of a major 7 chord - think of it not as the chord itself, but a voicing of it, like you would a note in a solo or bass line. F# is the 7, D is the 5 and A is the 9.

    A lot of the ideas will work, but they won't sound much like the chord because they don't have what I call "chordsound", or the 3rd/7th of the chord. If they have one but not the other they have "incomplete chordsound", which implies to some extent the chord, but doesn't outright say it. That's what the F# D A voicing is an example of. If they have both, then you can say they have full chordsound, and the voicing does a good job of implying the full harmony. I recommend tapping the bottom note so you can hear what the voicing in context sounds like, like I did in the video.
     
  8. mutedeity

    mutedeity

    Aug 27, 2007
    Sydney
    Right.

    Actually what I want to know is how the chord can function as a Maj7 chord, and therefore sound like one, as you said in the clip. In my mind playing P4s downward from the tonic of a Maj7 chord will sound more like a ii7 chord in suspension.

    To my mind for you to make a sus47 chord sound like a Maj7 chord you would probably use it as a substitution for a IVMaj7 chord. With the root of the chord played in the b5 position of the tonal centre. This will imply a lydian chord with the tonic omitted and a b9 in the bass.
     
  9. Cairobill

    Cairobill

    Dec 15, 2003
    London
    Please keep it up. A great source for fresh ideas...

    Cairo
     
  10. HaVIC5

    HaVIC5

    Aug 22, 2003
    Brooklyn, NYC
    Context. The sound of a voicing is governed by what other people are playing and by what other voicings you play around it. The notes C E G could sound like a C major triad, but the context of the chord progression might make it sound like an F major 7 chord without a 3rd, and with the 9th (a bass player/keyboarding playing an F would help this too). Guitarists and pianists do this sort of thing with rootless voicings all the time. It'll sound like a II-7 in suspension (unusual sort of thing in the more classical way of thinking about it) only if its taken out of context, like I showed in the video.

    Let's put this another way. Say you're playing a root/fifth bassline in C and the guitarist is playing the notes E, B, and D to create a Cmaj9 voicing without the fifth. When you play the fifth of the chord (the G), does it sound like the chord has changed to a G6? (G, B, D, E) No, of course not, the context and the harmonic rhythm of the C in the first beat makes the chord sound like a Cmaj7(9) chord. Bassists experience this phenomenon as well. The context determines how those notes will be perceived.
     
  11. onlyclave

    onlyclave

    Oct 28, 2005
    Seattle
    meh. nm.
     
  12. Martin Bormann

    Martin Bormann

    Sep 20, 2007
    Something about 7ths resolving sideways? Please Clave continue. I read that nonsense you posted, but maybe I'm wrong. Tell me how do 7ths resolve sideways? More importantly, how did the "great composers" resolve 7ths sideways?
     
  13. mikeboth

    mikeboth The last thing you'll ever see

    Jun 14, 2002
    Tallinn, Estonia
    Operator: prophecysound systems
    These kind of posts should get much more attention than those related to gear, IMHO. :ninja:

    Thank you, some good material to try and understand and practice.
     
  14. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Feb 28, 2021

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.