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Franken P progress pics.

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by philthygeezer, Nov 28, 2004.


  1. philthygeezer

    philthygeezer

    May 22, 2002
    Before:

    [​IMG]

    With 2 coating sessions of Birchwood Casey Tru-Oil:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    The thing is going to need another 5 coats or so before I do a final wax coat, but you get the general idea. I'm taking it slow.

    It's getting a Fender Original '62 pickup, a chrome Bad-ass II and one hole with a stacked 500K volume and tone pot (chrome too). Output Jack is at bottom. Should look classy and clean.

    Any tips on getting a nice clean glossy Tru-oil finish? How am I doing? Today I applied a nice sticky full-strength coat and then gave it a 'wash coat' with 50:50 Tru-Oil and mineral spirits, rubbing it and the tacky stuff in with a 3M white rubbing pad.
     
  2. Build coats should be 100% oil. I apply them with a paper towel, rubbing them in until smooth, let dry, then repeat. After several rounds of this, I might need to level things again with a very quick 1500 grit wet sanding, but then I go back to the paper towels and keep rubbing in coats of oil.

    Looks great!!
     
  3. Groove Theory

    Groove Theory Grizzly Adams DID have a beard.

    Oct 3, 2004
    The Psychiatric Ward
    yeah it does look good, I also apply w/ quality paper towels, and do the whole leveling thing. on my project right now I've got at least 11 coats and I'm not done yet, its actually got a great gloss to it alone, I've found that if you apply a real thin coat and without rubbing it in very much, then just haning it up to dry overnight, you can get a pretty glossy coat on it, I wouldn't do it for every coat, but on your last couple coats before applying a polishing compound would work pretty well...just an idea.
     
  4. The Geek points out something that each of us finds out as we work with this stuff. We all develop our own little techniques and they all work pretty good. I've done what he's talking about and it works just like he says. When I get to my next finish stage, I'm going to try a chamois for applying the oil and see if it does anything different.
     
  5. philthygeezer

    philthygeezer

    May 22, 2002
    A question about lint:

    How do you control lint when using paper towels? I have enough trouble with just the dust that accumulates on the 3m rubbing pads...
     
  6. Groove Theory

    Groove Theory Grizzly Adams DID have a beard.

    Oct 3, 2004
    The Psychiatric Ward
    I really haven't had any problems with lint at all...of course I'm using a quality paper towel, bounty or something like that, if you use a real thin cheap papertowel, you might have a problem with it breaking apart when it gets wet. so I wouldent recommend using toilet paper to apply the tru oil either :D
     
  7. By rubbing the oil into the surface until it gets nearly tacky really cuts down on dust that might stick. Besides, every subsequent application of oil is going to remove anything in the top coat because the paper towels act like a fine abrasive. The oil finish isn't as hard as lacquer so imperfections aren't sealed in. If you find some lint stuck in the oil after it dries just buff it out with another paper towel.

    My final step is using a polishing compound so I don't have a problem with airborne shop clods anyway.

    The blue multi layer towels you see at gas stations or the auto parts store are really, really good. They are lint free and smooth as baby's butt. That won't help with the polishing aspect but it will help with a really smooth application. A lot will depend on the original prep of the wood and how smooth it started.
     
  8. philthygeezer

    philthygeezer

    May 22, 2002
    I tried the scott towels and they are working great! Thanks for the tip.