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Freaky classical music?

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by Garrett Mireles, Feb 25, 2003.


  1. Not really freaky...just kinda spooky.

    Like "Allegro Moderator" by Fernando Sor?

    I think it's Moderator...I'd think the R wouldn't be on the end though.

    Anyway it's the one that goes:

    G|-16-------16-15--------16-17---------16---
    D|--------------------------------------------------14
    A|-------14-----------14-----------14--------
    E|----15-----------15-----------15------------

    etc.

    Anyway, anyone know of simlilar music pieces?
     
  2. BassWizard55

    BassWizard55 Guest

    Dec 21, 2002
    Rome, Ga
    It's moderato...it's Itallian for moderate (as in speed)
     
  3. I thought "moderator" looked funny. :D
     
  4. way_of_opiatism

    way_of_opiatism 28d, 6h, 42m, 12 seconds

    Feb 5, 2003
    Cobb!
    they usually do...
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Yes - "allegro moderato" is an indication of tempo - not a name/title ! :rolleyes:


    "Moderately Fast"
     
  6. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    It could be the title.

    It's not uncommon for pieces to be called 'Allegro' or 'Adagio' - or whatever the tempo marking is. Not to mention the movements of a symphony.
     
  7. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    But that's not the title of the piece - so you have Mahler's 1st Symphony or Beethoven's 3rd Quartet - of course there are movements which don't have titles and people might refer to them as the slow movement or the allegro - but that doesn't help you identify the piece - there must be thousands of movements marked "Allegro Moderato" !!!

    And you've got to give out "stick" to somebody who Tabs out classical pieces!! :eek:

    It's compulsory!! :D
     
  8. Well thanks for the helpful replies...
     
  9. yoshi

    yoshi

    Jul 12, 2002
    England, London
    If you buy a book on tapping in the progressive series by Stephan Richter (www.learntoplaymusic.com) it's got notation+tab for a Bach song (Prelude) thats played with 2 hand tapping that you may like. Theres also a song it in called crystal well that fun to learn and play!
     
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    As helpful as the request was....
     
  11. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Of course! :)
     
  12. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    But this was exactly my point - it doesn't help you determine the tune/piece we're talking about !! :rolleyes:

    If he had said "opus 36" or "from string quartet No 15", then we might have had a chance - but just to say "Allegro Moderato" gives no help as to which piece we are supposed to compare!!
     
  13. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    True true.

    And tabbing it just made things worse :D
     
  14. Molloy

    Molloy

    Dec 6, 2002
    Paris, France
    *shuffles through big piles of Fernando Sor sheet music*

    OK, that's the study number 10 from Sor's "12 studies" collection opus 60. (Sor wrote dozens of guitar studies and lots of more complicated pieces, so indeed, naming it "Allegro Moderato" is quite vague...)

    *Tries playing it on the guitar*

    Well, that's very "Sorish", classical variations and modulations. You may have to move some of the lower arpeggios up an octave to make it fit on a 4-string bass fingerboard, and it may take some work to achieve the written speed (allegro moderato equate to 120-130 BPM) with the aditionnal 14th fret fingering while on the guitar you'd be using open strings.

    You can find lots of similar pieces in the Sor litterature available, just get the music and try it out. Usually "linear" music, studies based on scales, translate to bass much better than studies based on arpeggios and chords that are written with the six strings in mind - like the extremely famous "Study n°5 in B minor". Another piece that translate rather well to the bass in my (very limited) exprience : Heitor Villa-Lobos' Prelude n°1. Juste make all those GBE open strings plucks a single E, it sounds fine and it's not difficult at all, except the final descent.

    Whoops, gotta go ! Hope this helps !
     
  15. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    On another note, so to speak:

    If you think Sor is radical, which he's not, you should check out Webern

    Actually, any 20th century composer. They got into some pretty scary stuff.
     
  16. BassWizard55

    BassWizard55 Guest

    Dec 21, 2002
    Rome, Ga
    Has classical/orchestral music ever brought a tear to your eye?



    I'm serious.
     
  17. Killdar

    Killdar

    Dec 16, 2002
    Portland Maine
    yep....
     
  18. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Many times - I have felt very intense emotions at Classical Concerts and recently saw one where the finale was Walton's Symphony No 1. I was totally overwhelmed and felt a tear in my eye at the end.
     
  19. I just downloaded 2 of "Webern" material.

    No offense...but GOOD GOD that blows. It sounds like a 3 year old at the piano hitting random notes... :D
     
  20. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Webern was one of the Viennese school who were the first to compose atonal "12 tone row " music.

    I don't really like much of his music, but it's an interesting idea.

    I prefer Berg, Schonberg and Messiaen for this type of thing.