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Frequencies on a '64 Jazz

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by hoel, Dec 1, 2005.


  1. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    hi guys,

    I've participated on a live-album and I am now involved in the mixing process. We recorded 6 live songs, and 3 'live' in the studio. Live I used an Ampeg SVT-DI, and brand new strings. The result wasn't really good, the sound lacked bottom, so I recorded the DI-signal through an Ampeg B15R flip-top combo. It got better. In the studio I used a countryman-DI.

    Now my question is: What frequencies should I boost and what shuld I 'get rid off' in the mix? I want the kind of sound that Will Lee has on Letterman, defined amd not too fat, and I don't wan't alot of 'squeeking' from the strings. Motown also has the kind of sound I'd like, but they're recorded with dead old strings I suppose, so that would be hard to get. The music we recorded is fusion/jazzrock/funk/gospel style.

    Suggestions are very welcome.


    Regards,
    Øyvind
     
  2. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Less treble, a little more low mid. High mids flat, maybe a tad rolled off. Bass flat. Or, just turn the tone down on your bass to about 5-6 and run the eq with just a bit of mid boost.

    Oh, and I tend to like a jazz run bridge to full on with both. The neck pickup is not my best friend right now. Actually, a Sansamp BDDI with the bridge pickup soloed gets a great tone, IMHO.
     
  3. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    I can't turn the tone down on my bass when it's already recorded :)

    But thanks for answering.
     
  4. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Alrighty. I thought you were asking what to do to get that sound. You can go back and change the EQ to reflect what I said earlier. Give it some mids, and take down the treb. That'll get rid of some of the squeakiness that it may have, and give it a bit more definition.
     
  5. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    Thanks again for answering. I know the basics of how frequencies affect the sound, so I know that turning down highs will remove squeeking, but also make the bass less defined. I'd like to know exact good and bad frequencies for each purpose. Which frequencies will sound bad on a boomblaster/small radio that I should get rid of, and what should be boosted etc.

    Regards,
    Øyvind
     
  6. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Hmmm, now would you be able to rerun the track sparately through an eq (like a 31 band?). For big boom, aroun 100-120Hz. 800-900Hz is where i like a bit of boost. Treble rolloff can start around 3000Hz. If you wan to bring in some more definition than I like, you can take it up to about 5000Hz
     
  7. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    The mixing is done in protools so I can use various plugins for EQ'ing. :)
     
  8. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Nice. I'd say start there, and move around a bit, and I think you will definitely find the tone you are looking for
     
  9. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    I've kinda tried that, but the sound I ended up with sounds bad on various cd-players. So I wonder what's nana-frequencies and what's "good" for 'all' cd-players/tv's etc.
     
  10. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    What you can do is get a cheapie boombox that has an input on it, and monitor it through that. Then go to the nice monitor system and see how it sounds. You may have to reach a balance point in between them.
     
  11. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    I guess this is why we master a record, to prevent these problems, but we don't have alot of money to spend on mastering so I have to get a really good mix.
     
  12. Gintaras

    Gintaras Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 2004
    Kent Island, Md.
    I am a midlife newbie who started playing bass again. From 1967 to 1977, I played drums professionally ranging from heavy metal to jazz and a 3 year stint with the Marine Drum and Bugle corp. Also studied percussion at peabody. In 1975 decided to pick up a bass just like you and after 3 months another band was formed and there were 2 drummers and no bass player. Well, i got the job and never turned back.
    I have been playing a year this time around and have bought basically mid of the road gear. I relied on my instructors and talkbass to make informed decisions. Being a computer consultant, researching is a way of life so I really went overboard on my GAS !!! On the amp side you will find players who love certain amps and those who absolutely hate the same amp.

    Here is what I am presently using.
    MTD Grendel 5 string
    Hartke 3500 head
    Hartke 410XL cab
    Tech Soundsystems CT212 cab
    Sansamp BDDI pedal
    I have $1300 invested in all of this gear.

    My present instructor who is a Alembic user and my previous instructor who is a Ken Smith guy both own Dean's and think that they are one of the best deals in the under $1000 market. Also the Schecter keeps coming has been mentioned by both.
    If I was buying new cabs then I would recommend Avatar. I plan to sell my 410XL cab and get a Avatar 2x10 NEO. (bought the 410 for a song and found out that 88 lbs is way to much to be dragging around)

    Remember, this is an opinion of a newbie so do your research, if buying from Ebay then look at the seller's feedback, check the for sale section on talkbass and have a great time.

    Gus :hyper:

    My wife says that I need adult supervision ????
     
  13. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    What is this? Posted in the wrong thread, eh?
     
  14. Gintaras

    Gintaras Supporting Member

    Dec 11, 2004
    Kent Island, Md.
    Not sure what happened!! I was reading this thread about a drummer who is taking up bass and just joined talkbass. I clicked on reply to thread and here I am?!??! I will go back and find out what happened and see what I need to do to rectify it???
    Thanks
     
  15. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    You can always delete a post you've added I suppose. :)
     
  16. Sadly, that's not all that possible. Each speaker setup and acoustic space you listen in sounds a bit different - just like your rig will sound different in different venues.

    The best thing you can do, without spending big money to get your room and studio monitor setup sounding 'flat', is to listen on a variety of speaker systems that you trust as you go through the mixing process, and try to find a happy medium. One trick studio engineers often use to check a mix is burning it to disc and going out to their car to see how it sounds in there compared to other cds you're used to hearing.

    Another good option is mixing it to a reference. If you want your tone to sound like a specific tone someone else has recorded on CD, EQ your bass to match the sound of the recorded tone *using the same monitors for both the CD and your recorded track*. A/B the mix with the CD and make changes to match them up. That way your tone should sound the same as the one on the CD you are using as a reference when moved to other speaker systems.
     
  17. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    Any other answers to this? Suggestions on how getting the 'Will Lee@Letterman sound" are most welcome. I know other preamps are used for tv broadcasting and he plays well and all that but still... something is better than nothing :)

    Regards,
    Øyvind
     
  18. pickles

    pickles Supporting Member

    Mar 23, 2000
    Ventura, CA
    My first thought is to use a fairly wide low/lowmid boost centered somewhere between 100 and 200 hz. Make the boost extreme to see where the fat is, then back it of to something reasonable so you don't boom out the mix. Lots of LOW bass will usually ruin a mix, but that low midbass is great. Cut the guitars/keys a little at that frequency as well to give yourself some sonic space.

    Then use a lowpass filter for the highs, moderate-to-small Q, and sweep the center frequency back from 10k until you start loosing definition, then stop. You can then even add a little bit of a boost at 2-4k to make it pop, depending on the style.
     
  19. bikeplate

    bikeplate Supporting Member

    Jun 7, 2001
    Upstate NY
    HI

    Will uses Sadowsky Basses on the show. U might want to pick up a Sadowsky outboard preamp

    Rob
     
  20. hoel

    hoel

    Jul 16, 2003
    Oppdal, Norway
    Pickles: I like your answer. This is very useful. I'll print out this and take it to the studio for testing. Thanks!

    Bikeplate: I know Will uses Sadowsky basses, but the sound he gets also comes from equalizing...