Frequency Response - Fender Rumble 500 Combo

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by felis, Nov 18, 2015.


  1. bass.slinger

    bass.slinger Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 15, 2015
    Santa Fe, NM
    Well, mine goes to 1 Hz at -120dB. ;)
     
  2. bass.slinger

    bass.slinger Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 15, 2015
    Santa Fe, NM
    I find for myself that the lower midrange / upper bass range (around 200-500Hz) is much more important than the -3dB level on the bottom (assuming it is something reasonable like 50Hz or less) to determine if I like the sound or not. For full disclosure, I like a full or slightly accentuated bump in this area (I use Eden and Markbass cabs). I find it really cuts through against distorted guitars.
     
  3. bass.slinger

    bass.slinger Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 15, 2015
    Santa Fe, NM
    As stated previously by several other people, use your ears instead of looking at the specs since a lot of bass amp and cab manufactures have very "creative" marketing when it comes to frequency response.

    When I try out a new amp / cab I run over the full range of the neck at the volume I will be using it at in both finger style and slap (and some two handed tapping and chords if no one else is around). ;)
     
  4. mikecd1

    mikecd1

    Mar 3, 2009
    New England
    I got rid of my little mark 250 and NY121 and ny151 in favor of the Rumble 500 as it just sounded better to my ears (also pocketed hundreds of dollars on selling the Markbass rig which also felt good). Nothing against Markbass at all, love 'em madly, but the punch, usable frequencies, portability and the ability to tap directly into the amp section through the effects return with my BDDI sold me on it (bypasses the preamp and volume section entirely and inputs to the amp at full power). Now that I have the hang of the preamp on the Rumble I don't use the BDDI, but it gave me a great starting point and let me tailor the frequency output of the cab which is fabulously responsive and if I ever use the additional Rumble cab I can either use my amp rack and preamp out from it directly to the amp section of the Rumble 500 (giving me 350 [email protected] to each side) or just output from the amp to the extension cab which is what I usually do (500 watts split between the two cabs). Haven't needed the extra wattage in my rack yet, but I'm hoping for a gig where I will!!!
     
    Linnin likes this.
  5. azfatboy

    azfatboy

    May 11, 2016
    I also read somewhere that the Rumbles went down to 40Hz, so that is a great confirmation. But a low B is 31Hz, as I just recently discovered in this thread:

    For all you players that use a low B string - a trivia question

    So although we may hear "something" out of the Rumble when hitting a low B, it apparently isn't the low B itself.
     
  6. Passinwind

    Passinwind I know nothing. Commercial User

    Dec 3, 2003
    Columbia River Gorge, WA.
    Owner/Designer &Toaster Tech Passinwind Electronics
    You can find a whole lot more info on the broader aspects of this subject in the Amps FAQ sticky at the top of this forum. This thread is old and sometimes contentious, but if you dig deep you can find quite a bit of food for thought: Bass frequency/waterfall plots: what they mean to rigs
     
  7. The Fender Rumbles, from the 40 on up, share the same preamp, and are high pass filtered. You can hear the effect starting around G (slight), and increasing downward. The effect is to lose energy in the fundamental, but hear the harmonics untouched. The fundamental energy in the 'E' is still quite satisfying. For low B, the second harmonic (the first one above the fundamental) is 62 Hz, which is fully reproduced. This is done because of the heroic effort (cab size and power) needed to actually reproduce the deep fundamentals at playing levels. Also, by the time the loss of fundamental is audible, the frequency is so low that the second harmonic is itself fairly low, so the note does not suffer much. It also spares players from having to deal with the problems associated with those low frequencies.
     
  8. azfatboy

    azfatboy

    May 11, 2016
    Maybe I am missing something, but it sounds as though we are in what I like to call "violent agreement"???
     
  9. Passinwind

    Passinwind I know nothing. Commercial User

    Dec 3, 2003
    Columbia River Gorge, WA.
    Owner/Designer &Toaster Tech Passinwind Electronics
    Yep, although if you read through the thread I linked to (and many others on TB) you'll quickly see that agreement is far from universal. As with so many technical aspects of music production, the best answer is very often "just depends", IMO and IME. Yel_wink.gif
     
    AstroSonic likes this.
  10. azfatboy

    azfatboy

    May 11, 2016
    I read the first couple pages--interesting and awesome--but we're (or at least I'm) not really talking about a subjective issue about which there can be "disagreement". If the hardware can't physically produce the fundamental (we are not debating about whether or not that is a "good" thing, a "desirable" thing, or even a "necessary" thing), then it can't really, as Linnin stated, "handle a low B without issue". Maybe I am being a bit pedantic, but I think this thread was originally about a technical question (that is why I searched for it), and I thought it might be useful to others to separate the technical detail from the rhetoric. As I've already stated, I make no claim to be an expert, so I may not have achieved this intent with MY post alone--but that is why I posted, so that others could correct/embellish as needed! :)
     
  11. Passinwind

    Passinwind I know nothing. Commercial User

    Dec 3, 2003
    Columbia River Gorge, WA.
    Owner/Designer &Toaster Tech Passinwind Electronics
    Roger that, but one bigger point of that thread is that many basses can't/don't produce substantial amounts of fundamental "down low" (and low B is not all that low by some standards), in which case, why does the amp need to? Hence my "just depends" mantra.
     
  12. That's what I figured I was doing - adding some additional information and clarity. :) I think that Passinwind and I are in agreement with you that the Rumbles do not reproduce the fundamentals of the lowest notes on the B string. It's just that the issue of reproducing a musically satisfying note in that range is somewhat more complicated, and this aspect is really the 'meat' of the issue.
     
    Passinwind likes this.
  13. azfatboy

    azfatboy

    May 11, 2016
    Yep to both of youse, like I said, violent agreement! :)
     
    AstroSonic and Passinwind like this.
  14. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Sep 19, 2021

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