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FRET BUZZING QUESTION

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by iceblinko, May 4, 2004.


  1. iceblinko

    iceblinko

    Jul 15, 2003
    Ny
    hey all. i have a question about string buzz on my fender p. so i got a low action set up before i left for a five week tour. the thing played beautifully and with very little buzzing. not even two weeks into the tour it started buzzing like MAD! it only really buzzes bad on the first five frets actually. i know technically that means that i need some relief on the neck.. but i JUST got a set up!!!! i find it weird that two weeks worth of playing can do this to my bass.

    note that the bass has been travelling on long bumpy van rides, long flights, been dropped several times, has a different brand of strings, has been through some extreme weather conditions, and i play VERY hard on it night after night.

    even with all these things happening, i still find it weird that there was such a drastic change in that short time. do i have a weak or broken truss rod? i remember i tried to adjust it myself a while ago and maybe i damaged it! or maybe nothing is wrong at all and i am just freAKING out at a natural accurance. any help will be appreciated! THANKS
     
  2. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    "note that the bass has been travelling on long bumpy van rides, long flights, been dropped several times, has a different brand of strings, has been through some extreme weather conditions, and i play VERY hard on it night after night."

    Certainly none of these conditions should cause a bass to go out of adjustment. :)

    I can only assume that your post is meant as a joke. If it's not, you are a setup techs worst nightmare.

    I will bite though. What in your opinion could make your (any) bass go out of adjustment?

    Seriously, if you are going to subject your instrument to these conditions you have ONLY two choices. Have it set up every time it goes out of adjustment or do it yourself.

    I strongly suggest that you learn to do it yourself or hire an instrument tech to travel with you. Learning to do it yourself makes the most sense to me.

    There isn't a problem with your bass. It's operator error!

    Good luck.


    Harrell S
     
  3. iceblinko

    iceblinko

    Jul 15, 2003
    Ny
    thanks for the reply. even with all those conditions, i still thought that it was weird that the neck got ****ed up in such a short time. my guitar player thinks it is just because that i am using a different gauge strings. makes sense. please excuse my lack of knowledge on the technical side of the bass. i just know how to play!!!! i am learning though. thanks again for the help. bye

    tom
     
  4. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Please forgive me if I came off as a jerk. I really did think that you were only making a joke.

    your guitar player is probably right. the most likely reason for most of your prob is probably the change in string guage.

    There are three things that you might memorize for reference in the future.

    1- If the string(s) buzz on the first 4 or 5 frets, a relief problem is indicated and a truss rod adjustment is in order.

    2- If the strings buzz on the last few frets a bridge height adjustment is in order.

    3- An open string buzz usually indicates a bad nut if the buzz clears up when you note the first fret.

    4- So far as intonation goes, I wont even try to advise you because the last time I got into that, the self proclaimed experts confused the issue way beyond the point of clarification!

    A quick search in the TB archives will bring up several web sites that do a great job of explaining the mechanics of setup.

    Good luck. If I can answer any specific questions I'll be more than glad to. If I don't know the answer, rest assured that someone here will.

    This is a huge knowledge base that we have access to.

    Harrell S.