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Fretboard Analysis

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Correlli, Aug 22, 2005.


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  1. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    Here's an exercise to help you learn the fretboard - Nut to fret 12 in Standard Tuning (concert pitch) E A D G

    Way to approach it, would be to type it as it's layed out, BUT no looking at the screen, and no headings. Just the notes.

    The logic of doing the whole exercise, is to treat the excercise as a WHOLE, then split it into TWO (vertical, horizontal)... etc

    Also, when typing out the fretboards (x and y) notice how the notes are arranged around the note being typed.

    Code:
    
    Example - flats
         
         B
      G  C  F
         Db
         D
    
    Example - sharps
    
        B
     G  C  F
        C#
        D
    
    
    As you can see, Db is not the same as C#


    Hope you find my Learning Method invention useful (at least I've never seen it done before :meh: ).

    Code:
        Y
        |
    X---|---X
        |
        Y
    
    X and Y Normal - Flat Notes
    ---------------------------
    E  A  D  G
    F  Bb Eb Ab
    Gb B  E  A
    G  C  F  Bb
    Ab Db Gb B
    A  D  G  C
    Bb Eb Ab Db
    B  E  A  D
    C  F  Bb Eb
    Db Gb B  E
    D  G  C  F
    Eb Ab Db Gb
    E  A  D  G
    
    X and Y Normal - Sharp Notes
    ----------------------------
    E  A  D  G
    F  A# D# G#
    F# B  E  A
    G  C  F  A#
    G# C# F# B
    A  D  G  C
    A# D# G# C#
    B  E  A  D
    C  F  A# D#
    C# F# B  E
    D  G  C  F
    D# G# C# F#
    E  A  D  G
    
    X Inverted and Y Normal - Flat Notes
    ------------------------------------
    G  D  A  E
    Ab Eb Bb F
    A  E  B  Gb
    Bb F  C  G
    B  Gb Db Ab
    C  G  D  A
    Db Ab Eb Bb
    D  A  E  B
    Eb Bb F  C
    E  B  Gb Db
    F  C  G  D
    Gb Db Ab Eb
    G  D  A  E
    
    X Inverted and Y Normal - Sharp Notes
    -------------------------------------
    G  D  A  E
    G# D# A# F
    A  E  B  F#
    A# F  C  G
    B  F# C# G#
    C  G  D  A
    C# G# D# A#
    D  A  E  B
    D# A# F  C
    E  B  F# C#
    F  C  G  D
    F# C# G# D#
    G  D  A  E
    
    X Normal and Y Inverted - Flat Notes
    ------------------------------------
    E  A  D  G
    Eb Ab Db Gb
    D  G  C  F
    Db Gb B  E
    C  F  Bb Eb
    B  E  A  D
    Bb Eb Ab Db
    A  D  G  C
    Ab Db Gb B
    G  C  F  Bb
    Gb B  E  A
    F  Bb Eb Ab
    E  A  D  G
    
    X Normal and Y Inverted - Sharp Notes
    -------------------------------------
    E  A  D  G
    D# G# C# F#
    D  G  C  F
    C# F# B  E
    C  F  A# D#
    B  E  A  D
    A# D# G# C#
    A  D  G  C
    G# C# F# B
    G  C  F  A#
    F# B  E  A
    F  A# D# G#
    E  A  D  G
    
    X Inverted and Y Inverted - Flat Notes
    --------------------------------------
    G  D  A  E
    Gb Db Ab Eb
    F  C  G  D
    E  B  Gb Db
    Eb Bb F  C
    D  A  E  B
    Db Ab Eb Bb
    C  G  D  A
    B  Gb Db Ab
    Bb F  C  G
    A  E  B  Gb
    Ab Eb Bb F
    G  D  A  E  
    
    X Inverted and Y Inverted - Sharp Notes
    ---------------------------------------
    G  D  A  E
    F# C# G# D#
    F  C  G  D
    E  B  F# C#
    D# A# F  C
    D  A  E  B
    C# G# D# A#
    C  G  D  A
    B  F# C# G#
    A# F  C  G
    A  E  B  F#
    G# D# A# F
    G  D  A  E
    
    X and Y Normal - Flat Notes
    -------------------------------------
    G  Ab A  Bb B  C  Db D  Eb E  F  Gb G
    D  Eb E  F  Gb G  Ab A  Bb B  C  Db D
    A  Bb B  C  Db D  Eb E  F  Gb G  Ab A
    E  F  Gb G  Ab A  Bb B  C  Db D  Eb E
    
    X and Y Normal - Sharp Notes
    -------------------------------------
    G  G# A  A# B  C  C# D  D# E  F  F# G
    D  D# E  F  F# G  G# A  A# B  C  C# D
    A  A# B  C  C# D  D# E  F  F# G  G# A
    E  F  F# G  G# A  A# B  C  C# D  D# E
    
    X Normal and Y Inverted - Flat Notes
    ------------------------------------
    E  F  Gb G  Ab A Bb  B  C  Db D  Eb E
    A  Bb B  C  Db D Eb  E  F  Gb G  Ab A
    D  Eb E  F  Gb G Ab  A  Bb B  C  Db D
    G  Ab A  Bb B  C Db  D  Eb E  F  Gb G
    
    X Normal and Y Inverted - Sharp Notes
    -------------------------------------
    E  F  F# G  G# A  A# B  C  C# D  D# E
    A  A# B  C  C# D  D# E  F  F# G  G# A
    D  D# E  F  F# G  G# A  A# B  C  C# D
    G  G# A  A# B  C  C# D  D# E  F  F# G
    
    X Inverted and Y Normal - Flat Notes
    ------------------------------------
    G  Gb F  E  Eb D  Db C  B  Bb A  Ab G
    D  Db C  B  Bb A  Ab G  Gb F  E  Db D 
    A  Ab G  Gb F  E  Eb D  Db C  B  Bb A
    E  Db D  Db C  B  Bb A  Ab G  Gb F  E
    
    X Inverted and Y Normal - Sharp Notes
    -------------------------------------
    G  F# F  E  D# D  C# C  B  A# A  G# G
    D  C# C  B  A# A  G# G  F# F  E  D# D
    A  G# G  F# F  E  D# D  C# C  B  A# A
    E  D# D  C# C  B  A# A  G# G  F# F  E
    
    X Inverted and Y Inverted - Flat Notes
    --------------------------------------
    E  Eb D  Db C  B  Bb A  Ab G  Gb F  E  
    A  Ab G  Gb F  E  Eb D  Db C  B  Bb A
    D  Db C  B  Bb A  Ab G  Gb F  E  Db D
    G  Gb F  E  Eb D  Db C  B  Ab A  Gb C
    
    X Inverted and Y Inverted - Sharp Notes
    ---------------------------------------
    E  D# D  C# C  B  A# A  G# G  F# F  E 
    A  G# G  F# F  E  D# D  C# C  B  A# A
    D  C# C  B  A# A  G# G  F# F  E  D# D
    G  F# F  E  D# D  C# C  B  A# A  G# G
    [edit]
    This is a Learning Method, not just a "fretboard" diagram.


    [2nd edit]

    Here's a bit of a test to determine your fretboard and interval knowledge. I would also suspect, that it may help you when learning to read standard notation.

    To complete this small test, you'll have to transpose the tonic Key. Particularly the C# and A#
    Code:
    
    [U]tonic[/U]    [U]interval[/U]
    
    C    +   b2 =  Db (C#)
    Eb   +   b5 = A  (Bbb)
    Bb   +   b7 = ?
    C#   +   3  =  E# (F)
    F#   +   4  = ?
    G    +   8  = ?
    A#   +   b6 =  F  (Gbb)
    
    

    The best way to learn anything, is to write it out - repetitively.
     
  2. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
  3. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    What?

    A fretboard?

    I don't see any LEARNING METHOD silly. What I'm proposing is a method to learn the fretboard inside out. You, start at the top, and work you way down though the various fretboard inversions.

    Nice try though.

    Also, what a revolting website!!! It should be a crime to shove so much advertising at a person. I take it you spend alot of time there?
     
  4. dlloyd

    dlloyd zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Apr 21, 2004
    Scotland
    Seems pretty complicated, and might suffer from learning the notes by sequence.

    The method that worked for me was to cut out 17 small squares of card, each with a different note name written on it (A to G "white keys" and the # and b enharmonic equivalents for the "black keys") and stick them in a bag.

    Decide which string you're going to play, randomly pull out a card and play the note.
     
  5. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    No, disagree.

    What you're really learning is the sequence of notes, vertically and horizontally.

    When you type out the fretboard notes vertically, you are learning that notes are either the 4th or 5th interval, either side of the note being typed. Also useful for when you get into alt. tunings.

    When you type out the fretboard notes horzonitally, you learn the sequence of sharp, flat, or natural note, either side of the note being typed.

    Nice try as well.
     
  6. dlloyd

    dlloyd zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Apr 21, 2004
    Scotland
    It might help if you explain your diagrams. Simply drawing out a fretboard then repeating it upside-down, back-to-front and sideways does not qualify as a "learning method"
     
  7. Not so, it could come in VERY handy if you accidentally string your bass backwards one day. You must be familiar with the fretboard when its "upside down" to prepare you for any eventuality.

    Randy
     
  8. Spikeh

    Spikeh Sex Strings

    Surely in that case you'd just need to remember that it's upside down, and very little to do with the fretboard? I'm not sure any exercise could help you with that muddle up!

    Good exercise though ;P
     
  9. Whafrodamus

    Whafrodamus

    Oct 29, 2003
    Andover, MA
    I learned theory and stuff before I picked up the bass, all I really had to do was apply it. It's important to know where the notes are and stuff, but it's more important to know where notes are relative to other notes. There's a difference between knowing where the amazon river is, and navigating it, ya know!? :p Before music makes sense on paper and stuff, you need to have it make sense to your mind and ears.
     
  10. Or if you pick it up upside down! That would be like being slipped a spoon with the bowl reversed.
     
  11. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    Reading music and playing in as many situations as possible is a far better method of learning the fretboard. My opinion of course. :D
     
  12. Bassist4Life

    Bassist4Life

    Dec 17, 2004
    Buffalo, NY
    I am going to have to agree with Whafrodamus. Whey you really begin to understand how basslines work, you'll find out that notes on the fingerboard are relative to each other. Once you know what key your in, you're fingers can almost go on auto-pilot if you know the chord progression.

    Excellent way to put it!

    Joe
     
  13. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    Not since my first month of playing -- their music theory section's been "under construction" since before I started...:eek:

    Nice try yourself, good sir. Quite the witty riposte.
     
  14. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Kiwi, I dig what your intention is with your exercise, but I think this is something you might want to have the student do instead of you giving it to the student as a package to study. Like have the student look at your first example, then have them do subsequent examples with you giving them maybe the first 2 or 3 lines as a starter. I agree that the way to learn something like fretboard command is by repetition, but if you've done the repetiton for the student already, the student doesn't really learn.
     
  15. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    I thought you said cycle of fifths is basic knowledge. Did you not?
     
  16. Correlli

    Correlli

    Apr 2, 2004
    New Zealand
    considering that I know how think, your post is irrelevant.
     
  17. spc

    spc

    Apr 10, 2004
    South of Boston
     
  18. Bassist4Life

    Bassist4Life

    Dec 17, 2004
    Buffalo, NY
    Kiwi Kid,

    This is not the first time I've seen a post like this from you. :meh: I don't know how much it is helping you that you are being so defensive.

    TB'ers are giving you their honest feedback. Feedback is good because it lets you know how your information is reaching people. Consider it a valuable way to make adjustments.

    Don't take feedback as a personal attack. TB'ers (in general) are really great people that want to help out. This is a really corny saying, but I believe that it's true.

    "People aren't going to care how much you know until they know how much you care."

    Joe
     
  19. hateater

    hateater snatch canadian cream

    May 4, 2001
    Eugene, OR
    Hmm... I second the cat that said that reading charts and just playing everything you can get your hands on is the best way to learn the fretboard. If you want to do something complicated, check out Pat Martino's whacked out diminished system. Instead of a circle of fifths, he has some other odd shape that works out somehow. I have a friend who loves writing out odd charts on graph paper, and he knows the fretboard VERY well as a result. However, all of the charts and designs drawn all over the graph paper didn't teach the guy how to play- he is horrible. Stick to learning the traditional way.
     
  20. dlloyd

    dlloyd zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Apr 21, 2004
    Scotland
    Yep, but that has nothing to do with your original post...

    Edit:

    Looking at the first three lines of the diagram...

    Code:
     E  A  D  G
    F  Bb Eb Ab
    Gb B  E  A
    E, A, D, G

    That follows the circle of fourths (or fifths in reverse), as does the second line...

    F, Bb, Eb, Ab,

    When you come to the third line, however...

    Gb B E A

    You have an augmented third, then two intervals of fourths.

    Following the circle of fourths, you'd have to name them Gb, Cb, Fb, Bbb. Enharmonic equivalence does not mean interval names are interchangable.
     



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