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Frustrating problem

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by funkybass, Jul 3, 2012.


  1. funkybass

    funkybass

    Oct 19, 2006
    Indiana
    I've noticed that I don't always alternate fingers. Sometimes when switching strings I'll do two index or middle fingers in a row. Any have any suggestions to fix this?
     
  2. JehuJava

    JehuJava Bass Frequency Technician

    Oct 15, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    I do it sometimes too. I wouldn't sweat it unless it is hindering something else besides being able to claim perfect finger alternations. :)
     
  3. Krakmann

    Krakmann

    Jan 6, 2009
    Madrid (Spain)
    Salud!

    That "raking" from lower to higher strings is VERY useful. There's nothing to fix, IMHO.

    (Ed Friedland states in one of his books that it's to be avoided. All the teachers I've met tell me otherwise.)
     
  4. Krakmann

    Krakmann

    Jan 6, 2009
    Madrid (Spain)
    By "lower" I mean "closer to the floor", just in case.
     
  5. Jazzkuma

    Jazzkuma

    Sep 12, 2008
    yeah that is not a big problem if you can still play the stuff comfortably. As far as cross string right hand fingering it varies from people to people.

    It becomes a problem when that technique gets in the way of your playing.
     
  6. Tupac

    Tupac

    May 5, 2011
    Are you raking or just not alternating? Raking is A-OK.
     
  7. bass_study

    bass_study

    Apr 17, 2012
    I think it is no big deal.. Alternating finger is the ideal technique, like more on the text book kind. i see many great players, like Jeff. Berlin, using index finger for his right hand for 10 notes in a row.

    If you really concern about that just practise alternating your finger everyday for those situation that you always use 1 finger, practise playing them slowly with alternating finger and you can slowly change that.
     
  8. funkybass

    funkybass

    Oct 19, 2006
    Indiana
    I'm not talking about raking( which I do intentionally do), but say im playing a c major scale, I noticed when going from the d to g string I sometimes use an index finger twice in a row etc. I've never noticed it hindering me, so I won't sweat it too much.
     
  9. So you're using your index twice in a row when going up the scale as opposed to down? Kind of backwards raking! lol

    I'd probably try and fix it as it may not be getting in the way of anything now but I could forsee it in the future, playing fast runs up the scale like that would be a nightmare!
     
  10. funkybass

    funkybass

    Oct 19, 2006
    Indiana
    Yeah it is like backwards raking!
     
  11. As was said the cure really is slow practice, you can build speed a bit later. If you feel that this habit may hinder your playing at some piont, one of the ways is to practice patterns accross the strings E A D G then G# D# A# F then F# B E A, working your way up the neck. the important thing is to practice leading with your index finger, then leading with your middle finger, you will probably find that you need to spend more time on starting and leading with the middle finger until it feels as natural as the index finger, especially with 8th and 16th notes. Good Luck.
     
  12. It didn't seem to bother James Jamerson or hinder his career. He used his index finger almost exclusively.
     
  13. I've been working on this for a year and a half. There are those who say it's not a big deal, which is fine for them. for me, playing using an unconscious bad habit has gotten in the way. If I choose to play with one finger, that's one thing. But if I do it because I can't control it, that's another.

    After a year and a half, I noticed this week that I can finally do it!

    I don't think it's important to alternate fingers EVERY time, but for me it's important to be able to do so or not, at will.

    Just my 2 cents. YMMV
     

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