fut you fender make a MIM with maple fingerboard!

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by nunk6, Oct 19, 2000.

  1. nunk6


    Jul 29, 2000
    is there any way to get a fender in the MIM price range with a maple fretboard?? why does fender offer the option of maple with american but not with MIM?
    or could anyone tell me where to get a decent priced maple replacement for my rosewood
  2. rllefebv


    Oct 17, 2000
    Newberg, Oregon
    Try Stewart MacDonald. All kinds of good things. The replacements would need some minor work, (Cut and drill the peghead...) http://www.stewmac.com or maybe Warmouth

    Have fun
  3. madvip


    Sep 26, 2000
  4. extreme


    Mar 20, 2000
    You can get a MIM p-bass deluxe with a maple fingerboard, but about the best deal you'll find on a new one is $419 or so...
  5. You won't have any luck with the Stew McDonald approach. All of their bass replacement necks are rosewood or ebony. But you could try Mighty Mite and Warmoth. They have'em with Mighty Mite being the less expensive.
  6. Got to see a Mighty Mite neck a while back. The lower price is justified, it isn't of the same general high quality of Warmoth stuff.

  7. Rockinjc


    Dec 17, 1999
    Why does it matter?
  8. maple is generally more punchy, rosewood is more mellow sounding.
  9. Rockinjc


    Dec 17, 1999
    No offence but the term 'generally' in my mind conjures up the notion of a myriad of exceptions. If a player were interested in a particular sound, I would encourage seeking an instrument that would get that sound within budget. I think there is enough variation from bass to bass as to how they feel and how they sound that going for a particular wood or design should be secondary to how a given bass plays.

    My god, in a blind listening test, who could tell the difference reliably? My Hot Rod P-Bass has a rosewood fingerboard, and could not be more punchy if my amp and cabinet used quantum physics.

  10. Skip


    Mar 22, 2000
    Bronxville, NY
    You must use generally with wood because it varies from piece to piece in hardness and density and that affects the tone of the wood. Which is why you always see, like every where else on this site, that you must listen to the instrument/amp/cab/etc. because YMMV.
  11. RAM


    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    I agree that if you want a Maple fretboard on a Fender-style instrument, go buy one that has that in place already! There are enough decent options out there that you don't need to be pidgeon-holed into having MIM Fender and have to replace the neck!

    The problem is that without testing a maple fretboard on your bass, you can't possibly anticipate how the sound will be affected, if at all! It's throwing your money down the drain!:rolleyes:

    And, another thing...maple isn't known for being punchy. That's something that's characteristic of less dense woods, and maple is among the more dense woods, and, unless you want to sacrifice neck stability, I'd recommend against getting a less dense wood for the neck. That's why woods like Ash and Alder tend to be used for bodies and have bolt-on necks. That combination will generally yield a punchier sound. Maple IS known for being a brighter sounding wood.:D

    And, if you want to really add to the punchiness, you may as well strip off all the paint and have an oil finish. Oil doesn't reflect sound waves as much as a hard paint finish, leaving the grain in the wood to make the instrument more punchy.

    Or, of course, you could just go and buy an instrument already made to your specifications...;)

    [Edited by RAM on 10-23-2000 at 01:01 PM]
  12. Player


    Dec 27, 1999
    USA Cincinnati, OH
    ......and I don't know how much affect the fretboard wood on a fretted bass will have. I would suspect little to none.
  13. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I disagree, Paul, but of course that's just MHO!

  14. Is this science, or sarcasm?

  15. nunk6


    Jul 29, 2000
    yea cant afford a american made and to compare maple MIA to a MIM with maple neck isnt right with better pickups and woods the MIA sound wouldnt be the same as if i replaced the mexican made with a maple
    so i'll save up the $$
  16. RAM


    May 10, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    There was an issue of Bass Player Magazine a few years ago, I think it was the "Secrets of Tone" issue, but not sure...

    Anyway, Michael Tobias was quoted as saying pretty much the same thing.

    I was being somewhat sarcastic, because I feel that it's an extreme change that the original poster is attempting to undertake, given unknown outcomes. But, it's also based on expert opinions such as Michael Tobias.