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G blues

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by marine18, May 5, 2010.


  1. marine18

    marine18

    Dec 30, 2008
    maiden, n.c.
    does anyone know how to play a g blues in a straight 8th feel and in a walking style with a swing feel
     
  2. guroove

    guroove

    Oct 13, 2009
    Buffalo, NY
    Sure. What is it specifically that you need to know?
     
  3. superhand

    superhand

    Sep 14, 2009
    Fresno, CA
    some one does, yes.
     
  4. marine18

    marine18

    Dec 30, 2008
    maiden, n.c.
    how to play a g blues
     
  5. guroove

    guroove

    Oct 13, 2009
    Buffalo, NY
    If you mean a 12 bar blues, then it usually goes like this:

    G G G G
    C C G G
    D C G D

    you can also change the second 1 chord to a 4 chord:

    G C G G
    C C G G
    D C G D

    Sometimes the 5 chord sits for 2 measures instead of descending to a 4:

    G G G G
    C C G G
    D D G D

    And sometimes, the instead of tagging the turnaround with a 5, it sits on the 1:

    G G G G
    C C G G
    D D G G
     
  6. guroove

    guroove

    Oct 13, 2009
    Buffalo, NY
    If you want to get into specifics, there a bazillion different walking patterns within each chord. Some common ones are:

    1 3 5 6
    (good for staying on the same chord)

    1 7 6 5
    (good for moving from a 1 to a 4 chord)

    1 7 6 #5
    (good for moving from a 4 chord to a 1 chord)

    These are just a few examples. But this should give you something to start tinkering with. Chromatics can be used judiciously to smooth out the lines, just make sure to use your ears and listen to see if these sound good.
     
  7. Pat C.

    Pat C. Supporting Member

    Jan 1, 2005
    Tuscaloosa, AL, USA
    Is your question about what chords and/or notes to play, or do you have a question about the rhythm?

    A shuffle or swing groove is most typical, a straight eighth feel less so. These are rhythm examples only, not necessarily examples of songs in G. :D

    Rock and Roll is a good example of a blues (in extended form) with straight feel.

    Torn Down has got a shuffle groove.

    The Sky is Crying by SRV, more of a slow swing, with walking bass.
     
  8. When you say "swing feel" do you mean you want your bass line to swing, or you want the whole song to swing? Two different things!
     
  9. bassandbeyond

    bassandbeyond

    Aug 28, 2004
    Rockville MD
    Affiliated with Tune Guitar Maniac
  10. +1 for bassandbeyond
     
  11. can i say that i'm a fan of your work?
     
  12. bassandbeyond

    bassandbeyond

    Aug 28, 2004
    Rockville MD
    Affiliated with Tune Guitar Maniac
    Thank you! :)
     
  13. EricF

    EricF Habitual User

    Sep 26, 2005
    Pasadena, CA
    +1. This is a good starting point (Cheers, Doug!).

    Also...getting completely comfortable with the structure of a typical 12-bar blues pattern is vital. There are variations (as guroove touched on), but work with the standard structure until it's automatic. Once you have a foundation of the basics down, the variations will come more easily. There are a million different things you can do within the framework of a 12-bar blues pattern.
     

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