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GED 2112 recommendation

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Fletz, Feb 22, 2018.


  1. Keep the 2 Hydrive 210s

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  2. One Hydrive 210, One Hydrive 410

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  3. One Hydrive 210, One Hydrive 115

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  1. Fletz

    Fletz Supporting Member

    Jan 16, 2009
    New Jersey
    Hartke artist
    I just got a Ged 2112 from the best seller I've ever dealt with here on Talkbass (and that's saying alot as 99% are stellar). I was playing an RBI into a bridged Crown power amp then out to two Hartke 210 Hydrives. With the Ged 2112 there is a deep and an (essentially) RPM that have their own outs and their own channels. As a Hartke guy, I am keeping my Hartke cabs, but am considering replacing the 210 for the deep channel with either a hydrive 410 or 115. Which way would you go?
     
  2. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    Cali Intergalactic Mind Space - always on the edge
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    Which frequencies does the deep channel enhance?

    The cab you add should cover those frequencies well regardless of speaker size.

    I would consider adding an HPF to make sure your not adding mud FOH.
     
  3. Fletz

    Fletz Supporting Member

    Jan 16, 2009
    New Jersey
    Hartke artist
    Sorry - ignorant question here: HPF?
     
  4. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    Cali Intergalactic Mind Space - always on the edge
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    HPF = high pass filter

    Also known as a rumble filter or sub-sonic filter.

    HPFs cut frequencies below a specific threshold letting the higher frequencies pass through.

    Sometimes combined with a low pass filter (LPF) that cuts off highs above a specific threshold letting lower frequencies pass through.

    For bassists, it cleans up the low end of noise below, e.g., 30hz., and protects speakers to a point.

    It also allows the user to compensate for poor venue acoustics where specific frequencies are over emphasized.

    Some filters are built to be adjustable.

    TBrs @fdeck and @Azure Skies build pedals, as does sfx. Some amps come with them built in.
     

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