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General rules for an audition?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by ncapone, Mar 11, 2013.


  1. ncapone

    ncapone

    Nov 17, 2010
    I'm auditioning for a spot in a local alt rock band, and I would really like to get it. They are a fairly established band around here, with regular gigs, a CD and management, so I know they're not fooling around. What can I do to ensure I get the spot? Of course learning the three songs they gave me is key, but what else? I can be a fairly introverted guy, so I don't want it to be awkward either. Are charts acceptable? I don't really know; I've auditioned other bands before and didn't get the position (we just weren't a good fit musically). Any suggestions?
     
  2. Snarf

    Snarf

    Jan 23, 2005
    Glen Cove, NY
    Don't use charts for this kind of audition.
     
  3. ncapone

    ncapone

    Nov 17, 2010
    Thanks for your input. I never use charts, but I tend to forget the structure sometimes.
     
  4. Art Araya

    Art Araya

    May 29, 2006
    Palm Coast, FL
    I'm not against charts. To me they show me that a musician is serious, has put time in, wants to get it right, etc... If a person's nose is totally in the charts however rather than just glancing at them occasionally, that will send me a different message however - that the person has not spent enough time preparing the song.

    Come knowing the songs - no excuses - simply nail the parts on the three songs.

    Try and sound and feel like the guy you're replacing somewhat but yet add your own subtle flavors.

    Even though you're an introvert you've got to try to be friendly. They won't want you in the band if you're too uncomfortable to be around.
     
  5. sammyp

    sammyp

    Aug 20, 2010
    NB, Canada
    Be on time, good tone, no charts, friendly, bright and confident not cocky! Don't be introverted for this one!
     
  6. IMHO

    1 - Be on time
    2 - Be sober
    3 - Know the material (if you need to use the charts at this point I see no problem with that, but don't let that be a substitute for knowing the material)
    4 - Bring something to take notes with and do so for better practicing later
    5 - Be humble
    6 - Have fun (smile)

    Good luck my friend
     
  7. jaibeau

    jaibeau my fingers hurt Supporting Member

    Nov 12, 2006
    DALLAS
    Endorsing Artist:MIKE LULL / ERNIE BALL
    Every gig I got early on was because I could sing and played solid. Most "rock" bands don't want a noodler or overplayer. Solid, consistent and ask for a mic, you'll see-
     
  8. Snarf

    Snarf

    Jan 23, 2005
    Glen Cove, NY
    That's fine for certain types of gigs, like if it's for a singer that has a band leader/MD, etc. But a local alt-rock band? It's going to be a faux pa. Been there, done that, don't do it. Want to appear serious, look as if you've put time in, want to actually get it right? Just learn the stuff. I use charts for certain things too, like a church gig and a band that never rehearses and has ridiculous forms and chords (off the charts with that project now though). Rule of thumb: avoid them unless they're really necessary.
     
  9. I'm for not using charts as well. Unless the tunes are extremely complicated, it always looks good to a prospective band that you're professional and dedicated enough to put the time in to memorizing the tunes.

    Some other thoughts - if they do original tunes, I'm assuming you're learning them off a recording. Do your best to learn the original basslines as closely as possible to the recording. Assuming the audition will be the 1st time you've played with these guys, it'll help that they'll be hearing a bassline that they already know and are comfortable with. I'd recommend avoiding changing the bassline around too much until you're in the band.

    Also, do they have vidoes available? What is the on-stage attitude of the old bass player? Do they jump around, or just stand there? This might also help to give you an idea of what level of energy they're used to from their bass player.

    Having said all this, I read this a while ago on how to be an effective sub in a band, and I think it could also apply here: you don't want to sound like the regular bass player. Instead, you want to sound like YOU'RE the bass player for the band.

    One last thought - what sort of image (visually-speaking) does the band project? I've learned over the years - come to the audition dressed like you're about to go on stage with these guys (i.e. - don't show up for a death metal band audition wearing shorts, flip-flops, and a tropical shirt).
     
  10. fenderbassman40

    fenderbassman40

    Apr 7, 2011
    Err on the side of quiet. Sell yr playing then yr personality. Even if yr freaking out internally exude a cool demeanor. Practice the tunes for as many hours as you can, go over them again and again. Seriously overindulge the material

    For three tunes I wouldn't use charts. But I would chart out a few other
    Tunes to show you went beyond what was asked.
     
  11. jaibeau

    jaibeau my fingers hurt Supporting Member

    Nov 12, 2006
    DALLAS
    Endorsing Artist:MIKE LULL / ERNIE BALL
    Agreed, kinda like why you can't write on your hand to take a test-
     
  12. frozenbolt

    frozenbolt

    Jan 28, 2013
    Shevegas
    Don't dis anybody in the group, nor their equipment, look, song selections or talents.

    When I was playing guitar, we auditioned a guy for bass who, when he walked in, warmed up with Money, from DSOM, used intricate fills for simple bass lines, stated when I placed a capo on my guitar, "Guys who use a capo don't know how to play guitar" and when asked about our setlist, stated, "well, I can manage to get through all those songs I don't like until I come to one that I do."

    You think he got the job? Well, there's a reason I'm playing the bass now, instead of him. :)

    In other words, a bit of humbleness and tact go a long way. You can start adding input to the band after you have the job.

    Best of Luck,
    'Bolt
     
  13. ncapone

    ncapone

    Nov 17, 2010
    Thanks for all the suggestions everyone-- I'm sure I'll get the gig now!
     
  14. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    Cali Intergalactic Mind Space - always on the edge
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
  15. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    Don't show up to a rock band audition with charts for three songs.
     
  16. ncapone

    ncapone

    Nov 17, 2010
    Thanks everyone. I took all of your advice and I ended up getting the gig. Not entirely expecting a decision tonight, but they said I'm in if I want the position. So there you have it!
     
  17. Congrats!
     
  18. Good for you! I just went through the same thing auditioning for a second band to play with. One of the biggest reasons I got it was not just that I have the chops to play it, but even harder to find was that my personality and musicality meshed with all the guys. Only after a few sessions together does all the ribbing start :p
     
  19. sammyp

    sammyp

    Aug 20, 2010
    NB, Canada
    Sweet!
     
  20. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    Cali Intergalactic Mind Space - always on the edge
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    Another successful TB thread~!

    Way to go everyone. :)
     

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