Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

getting the right cables

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by only4him012, Oct 23, 2003.


  1. only4him012

    only4him012

    Nov 11, 2002
    NJ
    hi,
    i read so many times that people make their own cables.

    what's the name and the kind of cable that you get?
    what factor do you look at when you are buying to make your own?
    how did you find it out?


    let's see who get's it right...
     
  2. i don't make my own cables but i think 'Monster' and 'Ixos' have excelent cables, i use theyr interconnect and speaker cables for my home hifi.

    anyone disagree?
     
  3. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Any cable over 10 bucks is fine.... Monster cables will last you for life though, but they are pretty expensive. IMO not worth it if you just play at home.
     
  4. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    I never buy snake oil cables a la Monster.

    I just buy some decent cable (e.g. Klotz) and some Neutrik plugs, heat up the ol' bunsen burner and solder away ;)
     
  5. pbd

    pbd Commercial User

    Jul 17, 2003
    Metro Detroit
    owner Procables N Sound
    Some good bulk cables are, Belden (performer series), Canare(star quad or L2t2s), West Penn (don't recall the number). There are others, of course, but I've used these due to their durability, number of strands per conductor(aids in longevity of the cable due to flexibility), Shield strength, 85%-98%, and the ease of working with the cable. I'm with JMX on the connectors, I love everything about Neutrik.
     
  6. I go down to Dick Smiths Electronics, buy some microphone cable, some nickel connectors and some heatshrink.

    Solder them up. Ive been soldering for ten years and trained in it... it aint hard though.

    No noise, have held up longer than my guitarists cables have. *shrugs* i cant complain. People on these forums and others seem to think the concept of making ones own cables means they are inferior in someway. I think its hogwash.

    :D:D

    Merls
     
  7. Want to make your homemade cable absolutely as bulletproof as it can be?

    After you've soldered the leads to the plug and before you pull the cover back up over the connections, take a squeeze tube of silicone and totally fill the shield cover and screw it over the connections. When it sets up it will make the connection even stronger. I had an old coily cord (back when they were popular) that lasted about 5 years with this treatment. The ends never broke but the cable died somewhere along it's length. Now I use the large plastic type 1/4" plugs because they have nice, large solder lugs. Fill'em with the silicone and they are as sturdy as a molded plug.
     
  8. I use Canare GS-6 cable and Gold Neutrik 1/4 inch jacks for guitar cable.

    For Speaker cables I use Redco 2/12 Gauge speaker cable and Neutrik Speakon connectors.

    For Mic cables and interconnect cables I use either Canare starquad or Mogami cable, and Neutrik XLR connectors.

    That just about covers it I think

    Scott
     
  9. jondog

    jondog

    Mar 14, 2002
    NYC metro area
    There is *nothing* wrong with homemade cables, unless you don't know how to solder. How could you get it wrong?

    I used bulk speaker cable from Lowe's, and the ends off of some store-bought cables that died. Make sure speaker cable is thick but still flexible.
     
  10. kazuhank

    kazuhank

    Nov 12, 2002
    Portland, OR
    George L's make a great do it yourself cable that has earned rave reviews from Guitar and Bass Player magazine (in their cable shootout several years ago). The cable is a thin black cable that is sold off of a spool, and their ends are a single screw-down type that requires no soldering.

    I personally prefer to solder my own cables, but if you are just starting out try George L's. They seem to make it easy and their cables were the only cables in the review to survive having a cymbal dropped on them.
     
  11. pbd

    pbd Commercial User

    Jul 17, 2003
    Metro Detroit
    owner Procables N Sound
    You have to be carefull with coax cable due to it's higher capacitance. This can create a loss of frequencies, especially in longer runs.