Gig playing ~vs~ "studio" playing

Discussion in 'Bass Humor & Gig Stories [BG]' started by nil, Mar 11, 2002.

  1. Couldn't figure out the best subject line for this, but here goes:

    How many people out there tend to play live gigs with a little more "looseness" and experimentation than when practising, or recording? I'm talking primarily about original compositions...

    How true to your songs do you stick?

    I'm always of the opinion that a live gig should not necessarily sound like a recording on stage - a bit of expression (to a degree) adds a bit of "life" in a live situation.

    Or do people stick to what is written, and don't stray?

    How many people out there in bands where the role of the rhythm section is 100% defined and there's no room to move, and the "live expression" is only allowed by the g****rist(s) and singer?
  2. Brendan


    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    Live, I play a few songs as precise as I can, becuase it really adds to the mix, but on other songs, I can/have/do forsake precision (not to mention common sense) and just go. Given the nature of the music, nobody notices.

    In the studio, it's all buisness.
  3. Same Here !!

    Studio work is all business and precise. Every note where it should be, nice and tight with the drums.

    Live is another story. My band has only 1 guitarist. So where things can be doubled in the studio, live are a little empty. I usually will play differently to fill out the sound during solos, etc.
  4. Brendan


    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    Same situation with the One guitar player, though my lines are made without the dubs, so I fill in on record too.
  5. ldiezman


    Jul 11, 2001
    Yeah in a studio situation, i play everything note for note.. Live.. I will experiment and what not. through in a bass run to grab someone attention or somethin
  6. slade


    Apr 5, 2001
    I agree with everything said thus far- but it also really depends on what style you're playing. If you're playing in a funk/ acid jazz band you had best improvise at least a bit- whereas playing bass in a country band tends to be a bit more precise and true to record. Always leave yourself room for expression- without it music can't breathe!
  7. eli

    eli Mad showoff 7-stringer and Wish lover Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 1999
    NW suburban Chicago
    Y'know, I'm definitely of the "play wilder live" mindset too, but I've begun to wonder -- if a recording sounds its absolute best when played right to the rat's patootie, then why doesn't the same hold true live? :confused:
  8. Most likely the ebb and flow, dynamics and interaction of the band members when working as a "unit" on stage...
  9. I HATE playing in the studio. I would rather play in front of a million booing rock fans than the rest of my band and a sound engineer.
    I just spent the weekend in the studio and came entirely too close to a nervous breakdown more than once.
  10. Selta


    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    Whenever we would play one of our originals in a gig, we all just play the basicis and if anyone wants to "go off into a solo/tangent" they can, if they are good enough to come back! We've been playing long enough to know each other's ways and we can write a song with no solos and then at the gig just kind of break into a solo (either guitarist/bassist/or sometimes drummer) and then we can jsut kind of look at each other (because when one goes into a solo the rest just go back to playing either chrous or bridge, depending on song) and go back to normal. It works quite well live, never recorded anything in a studio so I don't know if it works then (if I had to guess it probaly wouldn't). We then will write solos from the recorded gigs...
  11. Selta


    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    I feel a little selfish! All you guys with only one guitarist and we have three...
  12. yawnsie


    Apr 11, 2000
    Actually, I personally find that I like to experiment more when recording - I can try out new things and listen back to see how they work, and what, if anything, could do with changing. That's how I work at the moment anyway, while my band is recording at home - if the clock is ticking in a studio, I tend to be a little more disciplined.

    Generally though, I don't tend to play a song note for note every time - I usually work in some variations somewhere along the line, depending on what mood I'm in... I've had some pretty, err, interesting results by doing that.