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give me advice!!!!!!!(please)

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by loismustdie, Jun 4, 2004.


  1. loismustdie

    loismustdie

    Jun 4, 2004
    hey everyone, this is my first post of what hope to be many, and want to say hello.......ok now down to buisiness.

    i am planning on filling the position of bassist for my band, and i would like to know some things before i drop some dough on a bass guitar, amp, etc...

    my uncle is, from what i hear, a very skilled bassist, and he advised me to get a j-bass instead of a p-bass because the j-bass is more capable of reproducing a larger range of frequencies, is this true? i'm gonna buy a cheap bass guitar, prolly under 150$ i've been looking on ebay and found some SX guitars, johnson guitars, i now that squire isn't good.....but what are some good deals around the net? maybe someone could take a few minutes and look on ebay and tell me what they find. please help me out...
     
  2. Figjam

    Figjam

    Aug 5, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Yes the jazz bass has a more versatile tone but if you like the precision tone, its all ya need.
     
  3. christle

    christle Supporting Member

    Jan 26, 2002
    Winnipeg, MB
    Welcome. Play both a p-bass and a j and decide which suits you best. It really is a preference. As for the Johnson, they tend to be neck heavy and that can be a hinderance. Not all Squiers are bad, you just need to play a few in order to find a good one. You might also consider Yamaha and Peavey. They are excellent values for their price points.

    Dan
     
  4. wich bass you choose is up to you.i would definately check around online for a good deal.i just bought a schecter diamond series for 239.99 fromwww.music123.com.i have heard alot positive things about sx basses,im planing on getting one myself.
     
  5. canary

    canary

    Jun 1, 2004
    hi, Both P-Bass and J-Bass can have the sound altered by either using the nobs on the guitar or the amp so its really up to which shape you prefere. i prefere the P-Bass personally
     
  6. Arthur U. Poon

    Arthur U. Poon

    Jan 30, 2004
    SLC, Utah -USA-
    Endorsing Artist: Mike Lull Custom Basses
    Ageed. Your uncle is right on the money, the Jazz has more flexibility. It's neck is not as wide as a P's, so it may also be more comfortable for you to play. BUT, the P's tone has worked for me in every style of music I've played. It's tone may not be as suitable for soloing compared to the Jazz, but I'm only asked to solo less than 10% of the time. I own and love both the J & P, they're both great basses, but I personally prefer the Precision. Go test drive a few for yourself through an amp you're familiar with and see(and hear)which will work best for you.

    Just my 2 centavos.
    Best regards, A.P.
     
  7. Mmmmnope. The tone and EQ controls on basses and amps can alter your basic tone (quite drastically in many cases), but you simply can't make a P sound like a J or vice versa.

    The J is more versatile, but the P has what many consider to be the ideal bass tone...play both, then decide what you want. J's got an offset body and thinner neck that I find more comfortable than a P, but models are available that combine aspects of the two (ie, my Squier P-bass Special has a J neck, P body, one P pup and one J pup). As everyone said, you just gotta try some out and figure out your own preferences. Good luck! :bassist:
     
  8. loismustdie

    loismustdie

    Jun 4, 2004
    i assume that pup means pick-up, what does the combination of "pups" do? with one p style pick-up and one j style pick-up.
     
  9. One of each? The best of both worlds approach, you can blend the tone together. I always use one or the other though, depending on the song, I never blend :).
     
  10. BucketButt

    BucketButt

    Sep 10, 2003
    Medina, TN USA
    >>my uncle is, from what i hear, a very skilled bassist, and he advised me to get a j-bass instead of a p-bass because the j-bass is more capable of reproducing a larger range of frequencies, is this true? <<

    If you're talking about the Fender Jazz and Precision basses, or close copies, yes -- the Jazz with its two pickups can produce a wider variety of sounds than the Precision with its single (but very capable) pickup. But that is not the only difference to consider.

    >>i'm gonna buy a cheap bass guitar, prolly under 150$ i've been looking on ebay and found some SX guitars, johnson guitars, i now that squire isn't good.....but what are some good deals around the net? maybe someone could take a few minutes and look on ebay and tell me what they find. please help me out.<<

    Just as with guitars, basses are not all the same. The Precision has a neck that's a bit chunky, while the Jazz has a much slimmer neck. For me (even with my slightly small hands) the Precision neck is just about right while the Jazz neck feels too small; but overall the slimmer neck is far more popular with bassists, so perhaps I'm a little wierd. And even with "identical" basses, there's enough variation that one will feel better than another in your hands; and while you might not notice it right away, one will sound better too.

    Visit as many music stores as you can, and play as many basses in your price range as you can. But play some basses outside your price range too. It's possible that you'll find a bass that costs more than you intend to pay, but "speaks to you" so compellingly that it's worth saving up the extra money.

    Don't rule out Squier basses. Some of the Squiers are actually very good values -- but even within the Squier brand, you get what you pay for. A Squier Affinity J or P bass is the bottom of the Squier line, I believe; a Squier that doesn't have "Affinity" in its name may cost a few bucks more, but it may also sound and play much better than an Affinity.

    Also, consider used basses. In beginner-level basses, used instruments are going to fall into two general categories: those that were badly abused and aren't worth considering,; and those that were treated with care if they were used at all. What you want to find is a bass that was played for only a short time before the owner either lost interest or traded up to a better instrument. What you don't want is a bass that has been "customized", badly banged-up through carelessness, or had its adjustments (especially the truss rod) messed with by someone who didn't know what they were doing. For example, a traded-in Squier Jazz Bass may cost less than a brand new Squier Affinity Jazz Bass -- but if it was initially setup properly and the owner didn't mal-adjust it, it may be worth much more than that brand-new Affinity in terms of playability. (Which means you can afford to pay for a new set of strings and a basic setup, if that hasn't already been done.) Expect a few surface scratches, and maybe even a ding or two in the finish of a used bass; beware of loose hardware, cracks, deep dents or other signs of less-than-careful use.

    I don't know about buying a beginner-level bass off eBay; it might be a good way to save money if it's being sold by a reputable buyer who includes a basic setup in the price, but it could also be a waste of money if you're buying from an individual who didn't know what he was doing when he bought the bass and never learned how to care for it. There's also a possibility that what you get won't be exactly as advertised, and you won't know it until perhaps days or weeks after the deal is done.

    Even if you eventually buy a bass on eBay, I still suggest you visit local music stores and see what they have; there isn't a lot of markup on low-end basses, and what you buy on eBay may actually cost you more (after you include shipping and any other costs) than it would buying from a local store. I usually figure the "fun factor" of being able to get my purchase immediately is worth a few bucks -- and a bass is a big "fun factor" purchase, unlike for instance a pile of concrete blocks.

    Please notice that I didn't ask anything about the style of music you intend to play. That's because, if you make low price your primary criterion for choosing a bass, you simply won't have a lot of choice; instead of getting the best bass for the particular job, you'll have to get the best you can find and afford, then adapt your playing to get the kind of sound you want. "Tone is in the fingers" -- that is, HOW you play is a major influence on the sound you produce.
     
  11. Oops, my bad...yea, "pup" is common slang around here for pickup, mainly because it's faster to type :cool: As for what the combination does, essentially you just get a wider variety of tones. On my Squier, I can solo the P pup for a fairly decent P tone, solo the J pup for a poor-man's version of the Jaco tone, or I can blend the two...with both pups full on, it's basically a smoother, mellower, less-aggressive version of the P tone.

    The Squier was my only bass for several years and it did the job very nicely; I don't use it much anymore since my main bass is now a Carvin J-style...however, when I want/need a Precision sound, I pull out the Squier, solo the P pup, and rock out.

    BTW, read BucketButt's post and pay attention. Though his name makes me giggle like a schoolgirl, he's got some excellent advice :D