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give me the skinny on the peavey T-40 bass

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by oldironsights, Mar 15, 2009.


  1. StarscreamG1

    StarscreamG1

    Dec 17, 2007
    The neck on my '85 isn't baseball at all. I can't stand a fat baseball neck and I certainly wouldn't own a bass that was like that. My '79 T40 had a somewhat thicker neck than my '85 though. And with the differing opinions on weight, your experience VS others both good and bad, its obvious that T40s are each individual. Some are heavier than others. Some have thinner necks than others. Some sound thin, while others are sound monsters.

    Comparing my '79 to my '85, my '85 has a much nicer neck but my '79's sound was friggin HUGE, my '85 seems a bit weak and I consider it age and condition of the electronics foremost. Part of that is due to the slightly different buckers in the 79 vs the 85 but I think a lot of it has to do with the care/use/abuse whatever T40 you are playing has had during its existence.

    Remember these are not 'new' basses and each one has some history be it good or bad. Each T40 has its own individual characteristics, each one is made from its own chunk of ash, and we all know basses are beasts of wood. I am willing to bet my T40 would tip the scales at about 14 lbs if and when I weigh it. Its just the nature of the Peavey T40, some will blow you away and others got the short end of the assembly line. *shrug*

    And its fine you don't like them. Thats just more for us that do to grab. :p I personally think Deans and Ibanezes are total fail but lots of people like them. :p

    Track one down and give one a spin OP and go from there. If you happen across one thats junk, find another. Play a few before making up your mind either way I say. ^_^
     
  2. Oric

    Oric

    Feb 19, 2008
    Georgetown, Kentucky
    I've always wanted a T-40, but could never justify it. Weight's not a big deal for me, I've marched the Conn 20K (seems the number describes the weight...). Come to think of it, they're the T-40s of the sousaphone world, heavy, but great tone and impossible to break.
     
  3. Joe Nerve

    Joe Nerve Supporting Member

    Oct 7, 2000
    New York City
    Endorsing artist: Musicman basses
    I borrowed one for a month or so. Liked it, but didn't love it. Was real heavy as everyone has already stated. Real old school sounding - deep and dark. Not a good bass if ya do any kinda slapping at all. Definitely worth the money they're going for if it's the kind of sound you like.
     
  4. This goes to show you ,you should always play something before you buy it .I bought Nightcityburns bass from him a couple of months ago . At first i was not sure about it ,but that all changed the first time i played it at show volume .THe pick-ups are really hot .I play it with both pickups set to humbucker mode and the phase switch on.I think it sounds awesome.Really dark and meaty but with really clean highs .I play it through a sans amp bass driver into a gk 1001rb and carvin 410 ,118 cabs . sounds great and i get compliments every show .

    the weight is a little much though. LUckily my girlfriend is a massage therapist. MY whole left back kills the next day and my right side of my abs from balancing the weight .But for the money i would do it again .plus it looks awesome.
     
  5. NOVAX

    NOVAX

    Feb 7, 2009
    Kalifornia
    If you plan on playing a T-40, standing up, for say, 45 minutes at a time, well you are
    more of a man than I will ever be. You had better plan on locating a good chiropractor
    while you're at it. I owned a T-40, but I can't keep instruments that I would not (or in
    this case, could not) physically play in front of an audience. If the beast weighed more
    like my Peavey G bass, I'd be the biggest collector out there (but then again the tone
    is probably in the ironwood that they made them out of.....I know it's ash). 2 cents.
     
  6. Dan B

    Dan B

    Oct 19, 2008
    Pittsfield, MA
    From what I have read, the T-40 is the Volvo 240 of the bass world. Built like a tank, can do many things, but it weighs as much as a baby elephant.

    That said, that's what I have read. I never played one so my word should be one of the last ones. Doesn't mean that it's a bad bass; again, it's VERY versatile.
     
  7. I was never too interested in T-40s until summer 2007, when I heard a bass player in a Mexican-music band play one. It just had a great, deep, yet articulate tone. Since then, I've been keeping on eye out locally for one. It may just be worth the weight. (Pun intended.)
     
  8. JoshuaTSP

    JoshuaTSP

    Sep 26, 2008
    I had one too.....really really liked the tone and feel, but couldn't handle the weight.

    Sold it. :(
     
  9. kjpollo

    kjpollo

    Mar 17, 2008
    CT
    my 79 natural/maple weighs in at only 11.6 lbs but that STILL makes it the heaviest bass in my arsenal by a full 2 pounds!

    I dont know that I would take it on a gig as my #1 but I would definitely take it as a backup and play it for a few tunes (except the one where I play slap-I have yet to find a strong slap tone!).

    If you can handle the weight, they are excellent basses IMO. Lot of bang for the buck because they are still rather inexpensive for a US made bass.
     
  10. Eilif

    Eilif Holding it down in K-Town. Supporting Member

    Oct 1, 2001
    Chicago
    Hi, I just thought I'd weigh in here. I love the t-40. And agree with the comments about it's versatility and weight.

    Despite what has been said here, the neck is not a baseball bat. It's standard p-bass width, and as far as front-to-back thickness, it comes in midway between between my MIM pbass which is quite thin and my Warmoth p-neck which is on the baseball side of things.

    For more information check the link in my sig for the infosheet. It's pretty accurate, though I haven't updated it with some of the more minute details that we were working out on the T-40 club thread last month. (appearance of plastic nut, type of switches used, dates of various headstock logo arrangements)
     
  11. GOLGOTHAN

    GOLGOTHAN Banned

    Feb 27, 2009
    the t-40 is a killer bass! infinite tone! the tone knobs are the key! below 7 = humbuckers above 7 = single coils.
     
  12. countshockula

    countshockula

    Feb 22, 2008
    The neck on my '81 isn't baseball battish at all. Like others have said, it's about P width, but actually flatter than some fender p necks. It's heavy, but not all that bad, I've played one all night and not really noticed. Just get a good wide strap. (It is heavier than my aluminum necked Kramers though, maybe I'm just used to heavy basses)
     
  13. StarscreamG1

    StarscreamG1

    Dec 17, 2007
    When I had my 79 I weighed 115 pounds and had this cheesy unpadded plain strip of leather 4 inches wide for it.... after about 15 minutes standing up with that monster I was leaning back against the wall and thats where I stayed LOL

    With my '85 and 20 years later, I weigh a bit more (though not fat) and now I have nerve damage in my back and a childhood injury to my left shoulder has made itself known since Ive gotten older.... I went through several straps for mine until I settled on the 4.5 inch wide padded levy super bass strap. I can stand and play that one now for about 40 minutes before it gets too bad to continue. The strap helps my back a lot but does nothing for the weight on top of my left shoulder so when the arm goes numb and I can't feel my fret hand, thats when its time to sit down!! :p

    Some people might wonder why I deal with a bass like that with the nerve damage I have. I see it as a testimony at just how awesome the T40 is. Once you get bit by the T40 bug, theres no cure for it. ^_^
     
  14. NOVAX

    NOVAX

    Feb 7, 2009
    Kalifornia
    Beastly.
     

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