Giving Tips/Advice/Criticism

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by FunkyLemz, Feb 6, 2006.

  1. FunkyLemz


    Oct 17, 2005
    Los Angeles, CA
    Thought Id post this hear, for more input.

    Well, I went on craigslist and met a few guys to jam with and wow!!! I went to the place they play and it was sick. Full 2-story garage/studio. There are 4 rooms - one for the mixing/editing/engineering - 36 channel mixer and the works
    The next room has a kitchen, lounge, and a very laid back atmosphere.
    The third room is upstairs - a chillin room with purple couches, which has a railing looking down at the band jammin.
    Bringing me to the coolest room of all the jam room. It's a very large, cool space with 2 levels and window view to the editing room. It has all the hookups for direct recording and almost every note we play when jammin is recorded. -

    The 2 other band members are more than twice my age, but they can sure play (at least the guitarist).
    The best part of all is that we just jam and jam for hours straight. We create some really smooth grooves and everything seems to flow. We have only played twice, but we seem pretty tight so far. Our only problem (at least I think so), is that the drummer uses the same fills over and over again. I actually need to say something to him soon, but I need some advice as to how to approach him and what points I should bring up. We could really use some more diversity in the jams, but so far so good.
    Thanks in advance,

    I also noticed that I have developed a very reggae influenced playing style and it's been a month and a half off of bass. Has this ever happened to anyone else? - Recognizing that they play a style of music that they rarely listen to after some time off from bass/or any break in playing/switching instruments, etc...

    I almost left out one of the best parts, I get the chance to crank my new bass goodies out. The best setup Ive used so far is my Aguilar DB 750 with a Schroeder 1212 on top of my Whappo Jr. This rig is just plain nasty with my stingray. I just got a Mutron III+ and that adds a lot of funkiness to the mega rig.
  2. FrigginChris


    Feb 6, 2006
    i'd say don't be like " you need to do this" but do it like "hey that works well but i think it be cool if you tried..." then give a suggestion on what you think would be a good idea for a fill.

    Another idea would be if you're both listening to something and you notice the drummer playing a nice fill and then you say something like " hey that sounded awesome, maybe you could try something like that during one of our jams"
  3. seanm

    seanm I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize! Supporting Member

    Feb 19, 2004
    Ottawa, Canada
    +1 This is a great way of handling it since it is a positive rather than a negative reinforcement. You are basically saying "You could do that!" rather than "You are doing something wrong."
  4. FunkyLemz


    Oct 17, 2005
    Los Angeles, CA
    Good Stuff! I will give those a shot for sure. What do you guys think if I got on the drums and showed him some stuff? I actually think Im more of a diverse drummer than him, but I obviously won't show him I think that's true.
  5. txbasschik


    Nov 11, 2005
    Leander, Texas
    I would try the positive reinforcement stuff that the others have suggested. My husband is a drummer, and I know that he does not appreciate people who are not, themselves, drummers getting on his kit and trying to show him stuff. He's had people damage his drums, doing stuff like that.

    He is, however, very responsive to comments like, "Hey, that's cool! Do you think you could try a fill in [whatever spot]?" Or, "Could you do a crescendo there? I'd like to see how that sounds."

    Give the drummer room to show what he can do, and see how he handles suggestions. More respectful of him than jumping on his kit, and prolly safer.

    Cherie :)
  6. FunkyLemz


    Oct 17, 2005
    Los Angeles, CA

    Here's the thing, he is a very busy player to begin with and all his fills are pretty much the same. Im a very moody player and the guitarist flows with me, but there seems to be a consistent intensity the drummer sticks with. I need to have him listen more than be fast and rockin out all the time. He's a pretty chill guy and I think he would be open to suggestions. How about that situation?
  7. How's this for an approach. During some of your jams, come up with some bass fills of your own, and then talk to the drummer and explain some of your fills to him and suggest it would sound cool if you guys locked on them. Instead of focusing on what he is or isn't doing, present it in a manner that is more of asking him to help you out by playing along with you. So you get to add more creative input to the jams, and you will get him to stop being repetative at the same time. Everybody wins.
  8. FunkyLemz


    Oct 17, 2005
    Los Angeles, CA
    I dig that for sure.:D
  9. That's a great approach. My experience is drummers can be a bit touchy in criticism. I played with a drummer a while back who had some fill issues like your guy. The way I combatted the issue was by asking him to get together with me for a couple of separate rehearsals so we could work on my groove. When we hooked up I asked him to not play any toms or snare fills so I could concentrate on locking in together. After a few extra rehearsals two things happened - the drummer started actually listening to my playing, lol, and he did a whole lot less fills.
  10. FunkyLemz


    Oct 17, 2005
    Los Angeles, CA
    Huh, I like that a lot too.