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Going snowboarding for the second time in my life. I need tips.

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Trevorus, Jan 18, 2006.


  1. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Well, I am going for a second time. I went back when I was in high school, about 4 or 5 years ago. I never got off of the easy hills. I can't traverse, but general straight riding wasn't bad, and stopping was getting fun.

    Unfortunately, I have a couple of friends which go twice a month or more during the winter. And they are on the rails, doing crazy stuff all the time.

    I am not going to attempt any of that stuff, but give me some insights on how to do well.
     
  2. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    I have a really nice board for sale. :D

    -Mike
     
  3. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Ahh, dangit. I wish I would have asked you about it. That board would be cool for me.

    I'd need bindings anyways. I may borrow my friend's extra board...
     
  4. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Go for some "Flow" brand bindings, and a pair of "Vans" brand boots with the BOA closure system. I really like the new Fargo's form Vans, the Contra's are nice too. I think DC's use the BOA system also.

    -Mike
     
  5. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    Well, the problem with that kind of equipment is that I don't want a snowboard that I wouldn't use much to be worth more than the vehicle I drive everyday. I drive the kind of truck where a full tank of gas would be a selling point.
     
  6. Your friends will be able to show you once you're there.
    Be aware that most injuries are to wrists and shoulders. It is good to wear wrist pads.
    Learn long turns without sliding to use when there is space. Shoulders aligned with board, knees bent, weight on both feet.
    Learn short turns with sliding to control speed (very important).
    Surf where there is loose snow, just put your weight more on the back foot.
    Learn to go fakie, 360 on the ground, ollie, frontside 180 etc.
     
  7. WalterBush

    WalterBush

    Feb 27, 2005
    Yuma, Az

    Watch out where the huskies go, and don't you eat that yellow snow.
     
  8. westland

    westland

    Oct 8, 2004
    Hong Kong
    I have three children who are expert snowboarders, so one year I decided to make the switch from skis to snowboard. I worked on it for two days and came to the conclusion that ....

    ... I'm too d**n old for snowboards.:crying:

    Here's the problem; when you fall on skis you essentially ski into the snow. No problems. When you fall on a board, you go straight down on your rear. I would wind myself every time...bruise city. And anyway I'm faster than my kids when I get back on skis. So I didn't have to put up with their chastisements once I got back on skis.

    Just my personal experience.:p
     
  9. Toasted

    Toasted

    May 26, 2003
    Leeds, UK
    Advice: You will spend more time on your ass than upright. That's just the way it is :)
     
  10. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Meh...no different than any given weekend.

    brad cook
     
  11. Gard

    Gard Commercial User

    Mar 31, 2000
    Greensboro, NC, USA
    General Manager, Roscoe Guitars

    + A million.

    I don't know the first thing about snowboarding personally, but one of the guys at the shop really injured himself last year.

    Sanders, who is our #1 neck carver, is also a fairly accomplished snowboarder (from what I hear), he went snowboarding one weekend with friends, didn't have wrist braces, thought "ah, I know what I'm doing", so he went out without them.

    His broken left wrist still hurts him when he's had a long day, especially when it's wet & cold (like it typically is here in winter).

    Wear wrist braces.
     
  12. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    I never had too many problems falling, but protecting my wrists seems like a good idea. Also, learning to make the back and forth turns to control my speed is what I really need to learn. Can anyne help me with that? And I am not going with my friends, just me and my wife.
     
  13. Toasted

    Toasted

    May 26, 2003
    Leeds, UK
    A non-supporting member quoted me. I feel dirty.
     
  14. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Not over the internet you hoser. :D

    I suggest you fork over the $30 or so for a beginner lesson when you get to the mountain. They usually take only an hour and you'll learn the basics. Maybe someone else can give you some directions in less words and typing that it would take me.

    -Mike
     
  15. Passinwind

    Passinwind I Know Nothing Supporting Member

    I used to run a ski/snowboard shop. The owner insisted that I learn to snowboard, and I wanted to do that anyway actually. I'd been a proficient skier for a long, long time. Rather than relying on friends or advice, I'd strongly advise you to bite the bullet and take one professionally taught lesson. You'll learn how to fall properly (not as obvious as you'd think), turn, check speed, ride the lifts safely, and just generally progress 3000 times faster. A friend and I did this together, and she wore hockey pads and a hockey helmet, which looked funny as all get out but worked great. I stuffed some foam inside my overalls, which was kinda hot but worked OK too. We managed to con the head of the school into teaching us, which was pretty interesting since he rarely works with beginners.

    Within two hours I could link carved turns all the way down an intermediate run without falling at all on at least some of the runs. I used an asymmetric race board and hard boots, which I definitely wouldn't recommend for a beginner. We tried that as an experiment, since I wasn't that interested in the pipe/slidey/fakie side of things, plus the snow was pretty hard when I went. To put this in perspective, it took me around 5 years to get to the same proficiency level when I took up skiing. But modern skis have changed that learning curve a lot too now.

    The next day I went it was softer and I caught a heelside edge and smacked the back of my head very hard. Should've worn a helmet. That was it for me, I've never gone again. It's a great sport though, you just have to pay some dues like in any adrenaline sport.

    I just got back into skiing last year after ten years off. I really missed being in the mountains in the winter. Have fun, whatever you do. :bassist:
     
  16. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!

    brad cook
     
  17. Toasted

    Toasted

    May 26, 2003
    Leeds, UK
    Ugh! Dirty, dirty *rubs self*
     
  18. Dream Works

    Dream Works

    Dec 5, 2003
    Toronto
    +infinite

    I went snow blading last week and I sprained my wrist. I couldn't play bass for a few days.
     
  19. Gard

    Gard Commercial User

    Mar 31, 2000
    Greensboro, NC, USA
    General Manager, Roscoe Guitars
  20. Theonestarchild

    Theonestarchild Artfully lost

    Aug 23, 2005
    North Carolina
    Alright mate. Don't wanna read through the whole thread, but here's my tips, assuming you know how to buckle in.

    Shift your weight, and don't try to turn by leaning back or forth. You have to turn by sliding your back feet out from under you. Or at least I do.

    Stick to the bunny slopes for at least a while, until you figure it out.

    If any skiiers cut across your path, catch up to them and fwap them in the back of the head for me.

    Wear goggles. For the love... if their blowing snow...

    Snow pants (I got some with padding for when I rock the terrain course)

    And of course... look for the hills with the nice green circle on them. Avoid the black diamond at all cost unless you're willing to eat it hard.