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good beginners method

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by lanceb, Jan 6, 2006.


  1. lanceb

    lanceb

    Jan 6, 2006
    I am a classical/jazz guitar professor at a community college. I have been asked to teach 2 students double-bass. I am looking for a good method that can teach them bowing technique, left-hand positions, etc. I have a limited knowledge of the double-bass. Theses students are absoloute beginners on double-bass but do have knowledge on the electric bass. Any suggestions?
     
  2. so you don't even play doublebass ? how are you expected to teach students then ? the double bass is not like guitar in many many ways, there are some great books available however you really do need a teacher to physically show you some very important things before you begin, things like balance, bowing etc.. i'd recommend you take a few lessons yourself before considering teaching others,

    btw Rufus Reid's Evolving Bassist is a good solid book for starters
    Good Luck
     
  3. lanceb

    lanceb

    Jan 6, 2006
    My familiarity with the bass comes from a string methods class I took as an undergraduate, so I have taken a lesson or two, somewhat. Thanks for the book idea.
     
  4. the Rufus Reid method book can also be purchased w/a DVD for better visualization, but nothing beats somebody in the same room as you, Rufus also uses the Rabbath endpin for ease of balance
     
  5. Freddels

    Freddels Musical Anarchist

    Apr 7, 2005
    Sutton, MA
    :eyebrow: Yes. Don't do it. Don't do these students a disservice. No offense but you're not qualified to teach double bass just b/c you took a methods class. Heck, I took some guitar lessons, a piano class, psychology even. I even had a gymastics class with Craig Handy (yes PE is required at NT). Can I teach gymastics at your school?

    What liability does the school or you have from potential injuries suffered by these students? :scowl:
     
  6. fully agree with Freddels, absolutely know the doublebass yourself before teaching others, reading a few books will give you some insight but does not qualify you as a teacher on the subject
     
  7. ToR-Tu-Ra

    ToR-Tu-Ra

    Oct 15, 2005
    Mexico City
    WOW! Maybe I could teach DB too? I've only been studying for a few months and got a couple theory books. :rolleyes:
     
  8. TGP

    TGP

    Mar 27, 2005
    Boston
    I can sympathize with you. I'm finding it difficult to find bass students, even electric bass. They want me to teach beginning guitar, which I'm considering. Maybe I can get some to switch to bass!

    Tom
     
  9. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Consider farming the students out, to begin with, to a real bass teacher for technique fundamentals. After they get started, take over and show them music yourself, sending them back to the other teacher once a month or so to allow the bass guy to make sure that they're on the right path.

    As a good teacher, your struggle is to get the students what they need. Sometimes that means that you're not the right guy. Meaning; You probably have a lot to show them musically, but get them to a specialist for the instrument. Bass is a big sucker and you can get your students in trouble if they don't get started right.
     
  10. jallenbass

    jallenbass Supporting Member Commercial User

    May 17, 2005
    Bend, Oregon
    Absolutely.
     
  11. ToR-Tu-Ra

    ToR-Tu-Ra

    Oct 15, 2005
    Mexico City
    Amen!
     
  12. KSB - Ken Smith

    KSB - Ken Smith Banned Commercial User

    Mar 1, 2002
    Perkasie, PA USA
    Owner: Ken Smith Basses, Ltd.
    I have a box of Band aids and I have been asked to do open heart surgery on my Neighbor. Any suggestions? Which book I should buy? Use the Steak Knife or Shipping Kinfe. Put him to sleep with some old Booze or a Booring story?

    If you are a teacher in Anything, the first thing you should say is "I have no Idea how to play the Double Bass and therefor I am 0% qualified to teach". Go to your local Symphony Orchestra and find the ones ( Double Bassists) that teach. Ask them and even one of their students would be 110% better than a Plummer giving Flying lessons. Just because he can throw a wrench doesn't mean he can make other things fly!

    NOW, if they ( these students you were asked about) already play Bass and wish to learn some music things like Theory or soloing, then this is good. Just do NOT try telling them how to play or hold anything.

    Before my older Son entered College he went to a local teacher for Theory to prepare him for his entrance exam to Music School. At the end of his lesson, this Guitarist take my sons Electric Bass and puts it on his left knee like a Classical guitarist and tell him he/my son is holding it wrong and this position will let you play better and faster. My son trained from 4 years old with me and has had other informal and some formal instruction in person with Melvin Davis, Al Turner, Freddie Washington and Marcus Miller, Gerald Veasley, Victor Wooten, Bakithi Kumalo. He has watched and studied DVDs with Jaco, Victor Wooten, John Pattitucci, Freddie Washington and Melvin Davis. With Stanley Clarke he just shared a Pizza and one hang out afternoon when Stalney came by to try out my Solo Italian Bass so he doesn't count here. BUT....... Where does this Guitar/Theory teacher come off from trying to re-invent the wheel?

    Teach ONLY what you are qualified to teach as an EXPERIENCED Player on THAT Instrument only!!!!!
     
  13. TomGale

    TomGale

    Jul 31, 2005
    American School of Double Bass
    I wrote my 'Practical Studies' exacxtly for your level. It assumes the student knows quarter notes, half notes, etc. and reviews all the bass basics esp. the left hand. It has received excellent reviews by the Bass World and the Double Bassist.

    "The "Practical Studies" is the primary source of learning. The
    sequence is impeccably devised, with each concept being logically
    presented and tied to prior material. It develops closed hand, first
    position, neck position and common bowing patterns. American folk
    songs (Oh, Suzanna, Skip to My Lou, Aura Lee, etc) are used as
    musical examples."
    Bass World - 2004

    I think you will like it. Either Lemur or the American School at ASODB.com carriews the book.
    Tom Gale
     
  14. Ken Lloyd

    Ken Lloyd Supporting Member

    Dec 22, 2004
    Portland, Maine
    Tom.
    For an experienced EB jazz player and reader just starting up on DB, would it make sense to begin with Volume 2 of Technical Foundation Studies supported with the Practical Studies you mention here? It seems Vol 2 covers closed, open and TP while Vol 1 covers only one. The reviews of your work are excellent; I'm just trying to get the right stuff and want to learn the right technique at the outset.

    Thanks


     
  15. I'M A 60 YEAR OLD AND PLAYED BASS SINCE MY EARLY 20's!
    IF IT WASN'T FOR MY PRIMARY SCHOOL HEADMASTER WANTING TO PUT A SMALL MARCHING BAND TOGETHER I MAY NEVER HAVE ENTERED THE WOUNDERFUL WORLD OF MUSIC. HE WAS A VIOLINIST BUT TAUGHT A GROUP OF US TO PLAY DRUMS AND HE'S METHOD WAS PLAY, "II: TAKA TAKA TAH TEH TAH TEH TAH TEH , TAKA TAKA TAH TEH TAH TEH TAH :II" AND WE MARCHED THE STUDENTS INTO CLASS EACH MORNING. EVENTUALLY HE TAUGHT A GROUP TO PLAY PICILO FLUTES, RECORDERS, CYMBALS, VIOLIN AND HAD A NICE LITTLE SCHOOL BAND. (He was NOT a MUSIC TEACHER).

    He was BETTER he ENCOURAGED any young person who WANTED to PLAY MUSIC!!!!!!

    Most who have comennted here have LOST THE PLOT!!
    Your NOSES are so far into the clouds you have lost touch by your own IMPORTANCE!
    Without ADULTS who want to ENCOURAGE new students to music, you guys wont have any musicians to whom you can pass on your incredible wealth of knowledge to.

    THE FUTURE OF MUSIC DOES NOT SEEM TO BE IN GOOD HANDS with this PROTECTIVE HIGH MIGHTY ATTITUDE.

    You may have to go back to college yourselves oneday and become ENGINEERS, if you can CUT THE MUSTARD!!!!!
    How CRAZY, here you have a GREAT PERSON, wanting to assist some students by asking some assistance from you learned PROFFESORS of Music and all you can come up with is , Liabilty Laws, If you have a knife you can do open heart surgery, etc.....What a LOAD OF CRUD!!! SHAME! SHAME! SHAME!

    Music Teachers were rare in my early years and we learnt from anyone who would give us the time. THERE MUST BE TO MANY NOWDAYS, just remember how you got to be where you are today, if by luck, chance or hard work .and the people who helped you along the way.

    HELP the man with some constructive info, and if he comes unstuck we've at least tried to help. I'm sure he knows his limitations.
    These threads are to HELP those who ask and not to belittle them.
    It was a pleasent suprise to read some were at least willing to assist without any snide comments, we need more of you.XOXOXO, and less of the other!!
     
  16. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    ...I'm sorry, what? I came from BG to DB and without lessons from a DB player, I'd spend a a decade getting to where I am today less than a year later -- and with worse intonation and technique to boot. A guitar teacher teaching upright bass is not only foolish, but incredibly irresponsible. This "high mighty" attitude is common sense -- a guitar player who "took a string methods" class years ago and has "had a lesson or two" is never going to be able to give anywhere near the advice on correct technique that's so essential. This isn't the recorder or the cymbal, here. Improper technique with a double bass can and likely will cause serious injury in wrists and hands. Not only that, but there's a lot of insight that he'd never be able to give his students on taking care of the bass itself. "Oh, jeez...I have no idea why there's a huge crack in the top of your nice, carved bass. Hmm. Shucks. Maybe that's what that chapter on humidity was about?"

    No. Vehemently no. And sorry "Koolhand," but your own Cinderella story doesn't hold up.
     
  17. I have a couple of college-level students who are double-bass beginners/EB players. I'm using the George Vance Progressive Repertoire Method books, but this might not be for you as it moves swiftly into thumb position. Barry Green has some books similar to Vance's, but I don't think they move quite as fast into TP. There are also the old elementary standby Essential Elements books, which are very, very basic.

    I might recommend also seeing if there is a bass teacher in your area from whom you can take a couple of lessons yourself if only to learn the basic mechanic of holding and placing the hands on the instrument. To me, the absolutely most difficult thing to teach beginners is how to balance and feel comfortable holding the the bass. This is tough to learn from a book, and, as I'm sure you know, it's incredibly tough to get students to shake bad habits once they've been ingrained.
     
  18. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Hmmm. I read my post over and I can't seem to find any snottiness in it at all, latent or otherwise.