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Good clip-on mics for upright bass

Discussion in 'Amps, Mics & Pickups [DB]' started by hgrind, Mar 5, 2008.


  1. I tried both the GLM 100 and 200. I found the 100 worked best for bass. But it was some time ago.
     
  2. Mark Gollihur

    Mark Gollihur Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 19, 2000
    Mullica Hill, NJ
    Owner/President, Gollihur Music LLC
  3. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
  4. You just need something to press the rubber sides together to firmly hold the gooseneck. You can cut a part out of a tube so it looks similar to the original sleeve, but I just bended some aluminium into an U-shape that sits over the whole length of the part the gooseneck gets in. You might want to use a thicker piece if it bends too easily (I think I used a square pierce half of a millimeter thick). No reason not to get the DPA rubber mount.
    But I think it would also be possible to use the clip at the gooseneck mount of the DPA holder or maybe also left or right of it. But I haven't tried it myself.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  5. Mark Gollihur

    Mark Gollihur Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 19, 2000
    Mullica Hill, NJ
    Owner/President, Gollihur Music LLC
    You could probably just use a small binder clip, then pop out the arms so they didn't buzz.
    57330-group3ww-l.
     
  6. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    I guess a binder clip would be better than nothing but the difference between that and the DPA barrel is the difference between pinching a pencil between your finger tips and clenching it in your fist. As a film grip I've used all sizes of binder clips to hold all sorts of items and am intimately familiar with what they'll do and what they won't. IMO it ain't the best tool for this application. Why half-ass it? I'd be after DPA for the barrel or if they won't cough one up fabricating one with some brass rod stock, a drill press and a file.
     
  7. OK...time to offer up my cheapskate Snark solution with photo's. Try it out as per my previous instructions to see if you like it as a permanent solution or as a temporary one before you spend your money with Mark for the DPA rubber mount or an H Clamp (which I have if I need it). ;) The mic is the ATM 350.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. matt holt

    matt holt Supporting Member

    Apr 5, 2005
    Cincinnati OH
    I have used the sennheiser e604 and been happy with it, especially how much isolation it gets. The clip is designed for a floor tom, but actually clips onto a DB bridge pretty well. The only problem I've had with it is that sometimes the release button for the mic cable rattles, but putting a wrap of gaff tape around the mic/cable junction seems to clean that up.
     
  9. Mark Gollihur

    Mark Gollihur Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 19, 2000
    Mullica Hill, NJ
    Owner/President, Gollihur Music LLC
    I agree with your point to some ends. OTOH, the DPA mount was developed by DPA -- to use with DPA 4099 mics. The barrel you're asking about is a component of (and built onto) the 4099 mic, and DPA is probably not inclined to provide it separately to customers who want to use their mount with other manufacturer's microphones. They would probably counter that using their proprietary mic holder for someone else's mic is "half-assing it" (to use your words). That DPA even offers the mounts separately at all is only to support the existing DPA microphone owners who might want to use their DPA 4099 mic with additional instruments.

    Please don't read the above as a "scold" - it's far from it. I myself would probably use the rubber spanner if I had a different company's mic, and would probably want the little clamp thingie too. I am well-known for "Frankenstein" modifications and re-purposing of equipment for unusual uses, and I'm always looking for the bargain!

    But the above paragraph, I'd wager, would be the DPA company line on the matter.
     
    Mr Ralph likes this.
  10. My cheapskate solution is shown here:
    http://www.talkbass.com/threads/micing-with-a-bass-amp.882780/page-10#post-14765262

    It's so cheap it's criminal but it's still the least intrusive and most satisfactory solution I've found. I finally bought a new wind screen for the mic, by the way (not so cheap after all).
     
  11. Mandobassman

    Mandobassman

    May 16, 2012
    I would certainly agree with this. Specs don't always equal results. The tie-clip mic I use only goes down to 70Hz, but the sound is wonderful and full. I have always believed that it is the mics' lack of frequency range that makes it work so well. The top end is only around 15kHz, but once again, it doesn't have the sizzle that many more expensive mics have and it also doesn't have the bleed or feedback issues. I get great sound and no feedback.

    P.S. I know I'm a little late in joining this thread so some of my comments may have been already covered.
     
  12. Mandobassman

    Mandobassman

    May 16, 2012
    Wow! I just noticed ee-san's link to my thread above my last post. That's the mic I'm referring to. Been using it for nearly three years now and continue to love it. Actually thinking about buying a couple more since Radio Shack's future may be in doubt.

    Here's the link to the mic in case anyone's interested.

    Hands-Free Tie-Clip Omnidirectional Electret - Radioshack
     

  13. Jeff: What did you do to the mic clip....cut the length down? And did you keep the two plastic rings around the foam?
     
  14. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    I pulled the 350 right out of the plastic bracket so it was just the mic and the foam windsock. Those rings are part of the whole molded bracket. Even if you could leave them on without destroying the whole thing there wouldn't be any benefit I can see.

    The clip was a very small oddball I had in my parts box and all I had to do was heat it with a paint stripper and squeeze and shape it tighter to grab the mic. You could use any clip though if you cut it down but I'd bet one for a small diaphragm condenser like a 184 size wouldn't require much if any trimming....there's often a fair gap in a lot of those kind of clips.
     
  15. Jeff: Thanks!
     
  16. stefaniw80401

    stefaniw80401 Supporting Member

    May 18, 2004
    Evergreen, Colorado
    Will the RS clip-on mic take 48v phantom power, or will it blow up? Anybody try this yet?
     
  17. Jeff:

    I picked up a rigid rubber mic clip from Long and McQuade. Cut some off the back end of the enclosed part of the clip and then glued in some felt on the inside.
    The mic fits in there very nicely...the felt and the foam around the mic provide a nice non-slip fit. Ready to use with my H Clamp.

    I really like how the ATM 350 works on my bass. It gets all the acoustic sound....I point it just below the outside of the bass foot on the G side and halfway to the F hole. I use it with the built-in high-pass filter on. Not a lot of gain needed so no feedback problems, even on a small stage.

    My cheapskate Snark clip method (above) works well too but the H Clamp/modified mic clip method is much more sturdy.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2015
  18. Mandobassman

    Mandobassman

    May 16, 2012
    "Will the RS clip-on mic take 48v phantom power, or will it blow up? Anybody try this yet?"

    I have not tried that. I'm not using it in the mixing board, I'm using the battery power and going into a GK amp. however, several years ago I used what was essentially the same mic from RS with a mandolin. I bypassed the battery and plugged into a mixing board with phantom power. It worked fine.
     
  19. If the mic is permanently connected to the battery part, it does not work with phantom power, because the capacitor that blocks DC from the Mic to the board does block DC both ways.

    If you can plug the mic out of the battery adapter, it might work, but it might ruin your mic. These are electret condensers, not regular ones. The voltage for an electret is only needed for the FET (think of being similar like an FDeck HPFpre without the HPF and with a higher input impedance). A regular condenser needs the higher voltage for the membrane, an electret has a static membrane loading during manufacturing and doesn't need an external voltage for it.

    So electrets are usually designed to use 1,5 to 3V. I don't think it would be a good idea to put 16 to 32 times the recommended voltage in.
     
  20. stefaniw80401

    stefaniw80401 Supporting Member

    May 18, 2004
    Evergreen, Colorado
    Thanks DearOldBIDI for the info ... I was thinking about clipping the battery off and putting an XLR end on the wire and get phantom from my board -- but now I see that is a bad idea. So where is the the FET? Are there any components in the battery module other than the battery and switch?
     

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