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Good low end during performance...

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by HAWKINS, Jun 10, 2005.


  1. HAWKINS

    HAWKINS

    Nov 10, 2003
    South Carolina
    I've worked out how to get a decent midrange tone to "cut through" the guitars and other instruments. Now, what is the best way to get a rib-cage shaking bass without it being too loud (the guitarists always want to turn up). We have pretty good subwoofers (I run through the PA via a Sansamp DI) that put out a 250 hz and lower sound, so I just adjust the mid and high output on my bass (lakland 55-94) and increase the bass output. Makes it a little muddy, but the vibrations come throught without it being too loud. Is that indeed the best way to do this, or are there other suggestions.
     
  2. GSPLBASSDC

    GSPLBASSDC

    Jan 25, 2005
    Phoenix, AZ
    Try experimenting with cab placement.

    For example, move your PA speakers to a corner or remove the casters (if they are floor models). I don't know about any of the signal processing components in your chain, so I can't comments on settings, but I have found that devices/settings are only one part of acoustic balance.
     
  3. eldave777

    eldave777

    May 24, 2005
    First of all you have one of the greatest basses ever made IMO. Secondly make friends with the soundman and tell him what you are looking for. If you can get a wireless during soundcheck and walk out front. That will tell you what everybody else hears. Guitar players always turn up. If you want him to turn down put some sheet music in front of him. Ha ha!
     
  4. HAWKINS

    HAWKINS

    Nov 10, 2003
    South Carolina
    Ain't it the truth! LOL.
     
  5. GSPLBASSDC

    GSPLBASSDC

    Jan 25, 2005
    Phoenix, AZ

    Sheet music....that's pretty funny...and I agree about the wireless thing. I have one and it's great to walk around and hear the sound coming from the stage during soundcheck.
     
  6. HAWKINS

    HAWKINS

    Nov 10, 2003
    South Carolina
    I suppose one day we may advance our technology and go wireless. Sigh.
     
  7. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    Try both running direct and micing the cab. The cab will allow you to get room ambiance/rumble in the mix. IMO/IME I've always had a full, well rounded/balanced tone, with enough bass to more than ampley fill the room.
     
  8. HAWKINS

    HAWKINS

    Nov 10, 2003
    South Carolina
    That's a good idea to try. Never done that. We gigged last night and most of the people thought the bass sounded fine. To me, its a little muddy and a little distorted. But then, I think I'm getting a "guitarists" mindset and worrying too much about tone.

    But then, if I don't worry about bass tone, who will?
     
  9. lowphatbass

    lowphatbass ****

    Feb 25, 2005
    west coast
    If boosting the bass on your bass makes your stage sound muddy or distorted try rolling some bass off @ the amp, in theory this should have a minimal effect on your overall sound in the "house" and may even help if you can dial up MORE bass to your d.i.. Most of our rigs are challenged in some form or another depending on what we are competing with, what our expectations are and what we have at our disposal as far as gear is concerned. I have found that it is often necessary to make personal sacrafices in stage volume, and occasionally stage sound quality, for the overall good of the cause. Rolling some bass off at my amp to achieve more volume and/or reduce stress on my gear is something that I have become comfortable doing when I have good PA support. Making friends with the sound engineer is great advise because ultimately we are at their mercy.
     
  10. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    +1.

    I have been running a direct line from my head and micing my cabinet for a long time now. Seems to give the best of both worlds. It also helps that we use the same sound engineer every time we play, and he does a great job of making my bass sound exactly like I (and he, also) want it to sound like. And we also have a hell of a PA to run through, so that helps out also.