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Good mic to pair with an e906

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by adamajah, Oct 26, 2018.


  1. adamajah

    adamajah

    Oct 9, 2017
    I'm looking for a sub $200 (used is ok) mic to pair with an e906 to place a little further back from my cab to capture more low end and maybe a little room. This is for distorted/fuzzy bass and down-tuned guitar.

    Any suggestion appreciated
     
  2. Ender_rpm

    Ender_rpm

    Apr 18, 2004
    St. Louis MO
    Any large diameter condenser mic would probably work reasonably well, maybe a CAD M127 or similar? Sub $200 is the hard part here. I have an ADK Odin that I use for this sort of thing, its int he $250 range new.

    One caution is that once you start getting into this sort of dual mic/distance recording technique, your room suddenly becomes much more of a factor. That distant mic will pick up all kinds of reflections and room modes you had no idea existed previously, plus all the fun of keeping it in phase. The results can be worth it, just a bit of fore shadowing. For dirty bass I actually usually prefer clean DI and close miced cab, then mix to taste. If I feel it needs ambiance, then its reverb and EQ in mixing.
     
  3. adamajah

    adamajah

    Oct 9, 2017
    Thank you. That’s some really great information.

    I’ve seen the DI mixed with a close mic’d cab method mentioned a lot. By direct in do you mean bass plugged directly into the interface (Scarlett 2i2 in my case)?

    My secondary need is for recording distorted guitars that are tuned down to D or C. My e906 is doing a great job but I wouldn’t mind mixing in some more bass from a condenser mic like you mentioned. I guess I could just place them both at the same distance from the speaker to minimize phase issues and then deal with room reflection stuff with blankets. It’s a small room - not sure if that’s a good or bad thing.
     
  4. frnjplayer

    frnjplayer

    Feb 3, 2014
    You can try a large diaphragm condensor as the room mic however i wouldn't place it " a little ways back". Either get it the same distance as the 906 or put it way back and capture the room sound. The slightly different distance is a recipe for some nasty phasing.
    An MXL V67 is a surprisingly decent mic for low $$$.
     
  5. frnjplayer

    frnjplayer

    Feb 3, 2014
    A fairly common method is to take the room mic, compress it heavily and mix that at a lower level under the close mic.
     
  6. Ender_rpm

    Ender_rpm

    Apr 18, 2004
    St. Louis MO
    Right, the distance ratios I've generally seen are in the 3:1 range, so close mic at the grill, then "far" mic at about a 3 foot/ 1m distance, adjust to taste. This plays into the phase issues also noted.

    Yes, sorta :) What I do is run a DI that sends a clean signal to the interface on an XLR, then take the 1/4" through jack out to the amp/effects and mic that signal, or take a second "FX/Dirt/Amp Sim"DI off that if i'm recording quietly. Best of both worlds, and you can always copy/paste the clean track and reamp it through FX in the mixing stage if the recorded tones aren't working.

    Honestly, many engineers end up cutting off the extreme lows of such guitars (unless its a featured aspect of the track) because they just smear the bass and kick drum tracks. I've seen 80-100Hz as cut off frequencies, which is well above the cut off of the 906. Close micing also causes a bass boost due to proximity. BUT if you want to go this route, use the same 3:1 distance ration and experiment. Small rooms are actually REALLY hard to record loud sounds in, due to bass buildup and flutter echo (if untreated). Check out the gearslutz.com forums for really excellent repository of recording advice. But be prepared, its a rabbit hole of its own :)
     
  7. adamajah

    adamajah

    Oct 9, 2017
    Thanks for the suggestion. Ooh, it's green drool
    Yeah I think that sounds like how I want to use it for guitar; to sit behind the mids and fill out the bass freq's.
     
  8. adamajah

    adamajah

    Oct 9, 2017
    The guitar stuff I'm doing is more "experimental" and won't have any bass (*gasp*) or possibly not even drums for the most part. I'm looking for my guitar to have a more filled out sound, rather than just occupying the middle. I'll try the 1:3 distance ratio, and I'm sure I'll be moving mics and tracks around to fix phasing and get a sound I like. Hopefully it won't be too much of a headache. I'm not looking for perfection, just something that sounds cool.

    Thanks again for your input!
     

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