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Good warm ups that develop speed?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Mike Money, Jun 4, 2003.


  1. Mike Money

    Mike Money Banned

    Mar 18, 2003
    Bakersfield California
    Avatar Speakers Endorsing Hooligan
    I usually just arpeggiate each note in the G-Major scale a few times starting at about a 120 tempo using quarter notes, and slowly working up to around 180.

    That has improved my speed quite a bit, but what other things could I be doing?
     
  2. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Well that's a good start, now do that with every scale.


    One thing I used to do, simple chromatic scale, one finger per fret, up to the 12th fret. then back down.

    the best way to gain speed is to start slowly.

    then one day, you will be like me, and playing **** like this :p :rolleyes:
     
  3. Ahh, just love to fret wank, dontchu!!! :spit:

    :D

    Keep working slowly with a metronome and just build up the speed.

    Do what W says. :p
     
  4. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Anyone can play fast, it takes a good musician to play slow.
     
  5. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
     
  6. Killdar

    Killdar

    Dec 16, 2002
    Portland Maine
    that's exactly why I suck.
     
  7. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    yup. I sure as hell have more trouble playing slow.
     
  8. Mike Money

    Mike Money Banned

    Mar 18, 2003
    Bakersfield California
    Avatar Speakers Endorsing Hooligan
    But speed is always good thing to have along with you.
     
  9. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA
    I mostly agree. I've heard as many tasteless boring slow bass players as I've heard boring tasteless fast bass players.

    Speed, in and of itself, is meaningless. But, speed in context is another story. It's not better, or worse, to play slow or fast, if it works.

    That said, practicing for speed is a waste of time. The same scales, patterns, modes, etc you practice slowly, you can use to build up faster, and faster. And, you get the added bonus of learning music theory. Simply play them slowly with a metronome, and increase the tempo, and practice until you can play them faster. If you are deliberate in your attack, and technique, the form is the same fast/slow/midtempo.

    It's all about muscle memory and stamina. I mean, playing a major arpeggio is nice to develop speed. But, at the end of the day, all you can really play fast is a major arpeggio--which is fine as long as you only play happy songs. :D

    That said, I find that what I thought was appropriate when I was 20 is vastly different from what I think is appropriate now. I can play just as fast, if not faster, when needed as I could when I was younger, but I now see different options that allow for more openness, and interaction with my bandmates. Space can be your friend, let it. ;)

    As important as learning how to play fast is, it's more important to remember that just because you can do something, doesn't mean you always should.
     
  10. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    I've said it before and will say it again - speed is a byproduct of good technique, NOT an end to pursued by itself.

    I'm gonna have to disagree with you somewhat there JB - IMO anyone can play fast OR slow, but it takes a good musician to play good music, regardless of tempo.
     
  11. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    " Time and time again,successful bassist's find they can do entire gigs and never play a solo or find a place for the latest Les Claypool lick.The secret is to play the RIGHT thing-the RIGHT music,and to be rock solid.The real truth is nobody's going to be impressed by your funky,triple stopped,two handed version of "Giant Steps".
    Bruce Elkington
     
  12. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    I think what jazzbo meant might have been more along the lines of it takes a good musician to show restraint and play things slowly when he could easy fire up the fretboard. I could be wrong.


    I myself have the opposite problem. I can play slow, but can rip out those 1/16 note styles like Rocco can. Well not as smoothly anyways.
     
  13. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Well yes, but I was hoping that that point was inferred.
     
  14. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    This thread has kind of gotten off topic..I wonder if Money is satisfied with the relevant answers he DID get?

    (he did ask for warm-ups to help speed, not the issues of musicicality behind playing fast)
     
  15. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    They are unequivocably related.It's the "cart before the horse syndrome"...I'll debate that with anybody,anytime...:)
     
  16. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Yeah, but, it's like. What if you get someone that is 100% uninterested in anything other than playing green day songs with a pick on a bass strung below their knees?

    and they couldn't care less about anything else, and you try and preach to them...but they couldn't be bothered, and they just want to know one particular thing about their specific interest, and no one gives them the input they want, because everyone is too busy talking about how much better musicians they are?

    what then?
     
  17. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    Try harder...
    (and it's not about who's "better")
    or get them a subscription to BP...those areas are adequately covered there...dude...;)
     
  18. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Well...to someone else, who doesn't care what JB and others might be talking about, what is the point in them debating it? and hijcaking the thread, and giving the original poster no insight into their problem?

    Other than trying to derail that person for wanting what they want?

    that's what I'm trying to say.
     
  19. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    We all start somewhere with the Bass Guitar...and I see a lot of guys here who started in the "wrong" place and trying to help some others who are starting in the "wrong" place now...I don't see it as egotistical or hi-jacking,but perhaps passing on some experience...whether it's absorbed or not...who knows?The goal is to pass on musical information and realities that have been learned...one such reality in 99.9% of professional musical situations you will encounter as a bassist;nobody cares how fast you can play.
     
  20. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Yeah, and I agree with you very much. So don't take me wrong when I'm saying this stuff, I just kind of get tired of stuff like "what's the best way to use a pick" and the responses are 9/10 "why use a pick?" or "real bassists don't use picks" or "picks aren't good"

    then that person may get frustrated with the site and not wish to post here again.

    It's like, sometimes you are just looking for a simple answer to a more or less simple question, the musicianship behind their inquiry should be irrelevant.