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Grammar help needed!

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by parrott, Mar 5, 2003.


  1. I'm sitting here writing an essay (well, I was, I'm now writing this:rolleyes: ). Anyway, it's the first formal thing I've written in ages, and I've totally forgotten how to use apostrophes in the context of "its"

    its
    it's
    its'

    What's the difference? I know there is one, it's to do with possesion (I think; or is that apostrophes with other words?) and I know that "it's" can be used in place of "it is" but what else is there?? :confused:
     
  2. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Ok...

    it's = it is
    its = possessive

    As for its' - I'm not sure that's even valid, gramatically?
     
  3. jcadmus

    jcadmus

    Apr 2, 2000
    "Its" is the possessive form -- The dog couldn't find its bone.

    "It's" is the contraction of "it is" -- It's going to rain.

    I don't know what you would use "its'" for, since it is a double possessive, which makes no sense to me.
     
  4. Sheesh, that was quick; and thanks!

    I'm sure I've seen " its' " somewhere, but I'm not sure where - I'll just leave that one out totally then.

    But another question;

    When I'm using brackets (like this, and I know that's probably not the right name for them) can I put a comma just after them-

    (like this), next clause ?
     
  5. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    I don't see why not.

    And parentheses is the official name I think :)
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I was always taught not to do this - it's unnecessary!!
     
  7. jcadmus

    jcadmus

    Apr 2, 2000
    I believe Bruce is right .
     
  8. I did not know that.
     
  9. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    I believe Bruce is wrong. A comma is always used to separate a dependent clause from an independent clause (parentheses or not).
     
  10. jcadmus

    jcadmus

    Apr 2, 2000
    Well then, what would you need the parentheses for in the first place?
     
  11. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    For a parenthetical phrase in the middle of a clause that is part of a complex sentence.
     
  12. ask yourself: if you took out the parenthetical phrase, how would you write it? write it that way, then put the phrase back in.

    the dog is a good dog.
    i like the dog, and he likes me.

    the dog (with brown fur) is a good dog.
    i like the dog (with brown fur), and he likes me.


    commas and semicolons always outside parentheses.
     
  13. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I was also taught that you should never precede "and" with a commar!! ;)
     
  14. I agree with on the comma-and relationship. I remember being taught that it was incorrect comma usage, always. I think it has become acceptable through common usage over time.
     
  15. Hey, that would mean that many people commonly have common comma usage in common with each other.


    Does that need commas?
     
  16. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    You mean comma :) or was that intentional?

    What's wrong with preceeding and with a comma? I don't recall being taught that one.

    I'm sure I must have been taught at some point not to start sentences with "So" :D
     
  17. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    You must have slept through grammar. A comma and a coordinating conjunction (and, but, or, nor, for, yet) separates two independant clauses.

    Expanding on DHC's example:

    I like the dog, and he likes me.
    The placement of the comma is correct.

    I like the dog and cat.
    No comma should be used in this sentence.
     
  18. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    The parentheses are used to add a comment in a sentence. Their function is not to separate clauses.
     
  19. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    There is no such form as its'.