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SOLD Greg Curbow Dinky Jazz

Discussion in 'For Sale: Bass Guitars' started by Hambone, Apr 13, 2010.


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  1. Bought from Margaret Curbow in the fall of 2007, this is one of the last instruments left in the shop that Greg built himself. This was a custom order that the customer moved onto another Curbow, leaving this one on the shelf for some time.

    Alder body, Rockwood neck with a rare, signed headstock that has a shape other than his trademark 2+2. I don't know what the pups are but they are hot as hell. Perfect shape, and plays like a dream. Precision width neck with Ultralites.

    I had this up on TB for 1500 but I'm dropping it to $1000 plus shipping because I really need the cash. It will ship in an aftermarket hardshell case.
     

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  2. More pics
     

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  3. More pics
     

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  4. emblymouse

    emblymouse exempt Supporting Member

    Jan 22, 2006
    W'Sconsin
    I am intrigued. I don't know much about Curbow. Does this differ from a jazz bass in scale or size? In otherwords, vat is vith the Dinky already?
     
  5. emblymouse

    emblymouse exempt Supporting Member

    Jan 22, 2006
    W'Sconsin
    :) I get it.
     
  6. pm sent
     
  7. The "Dinky" label is one that originated with Warmoth I think. It's not the most perfect description because the dimensions are all of 1/8"-1/4" smaller than a "standard" jazz. To tell you the truth, I'm a big guy and I don't notice the difference at all. Same 34" scale.

    All PM's replied to.
     
  8. Weight is right around 9½ lbs. Not the lightest but certainly not the heaviest instrument around.
     
  9. 2 questions have arisen about the bass so here's some more information:

    The bass isn't neck heavy at all. In fact, it's ass heavy and should be a genuine departure from some of the other Jazzes out there.

    The second issue is the question of whether this is a true "Curbow" bass, with the focus on the Rockwood neck. The observation was the it couldn't be Rockwood because the questioner had never seen one that looked like it. I assure everyone that this IS a Rockwood neck top to bottom and here are some more pics to help reinforce the fact. Note the layered birch construction typical of Rockwood and also see how it loops very regularly at the headstock transition. Further, evidence of birch is the two small "birdseyes" on the back of the neck. I hope this clears up any question.
     

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  10. Here's the headstock...
     

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  11. jpbiggs

    jpbiggs

    Oct 22, 2009
    Davis, CA
    I used to own a Curbow made out of rockwood and that is definitely not rockwood. Rockwood is a composite that is made from wood laminates (usually birch) in a phenolic resin under pressure. The result is a material that looks like wood with the grain filled with a metal. Greg Curbow used to add a dye to the resin before laminating which would penetrate the wood through out. This lead to a rather cool looking effect.

    This bass in this post has a neck that is most likely Rockwood-Lite which is maple laminated under pressure with an epoxy.
     
  12. Wow...the fools parade begins!

    Biggs, where did you get the term "Rockwood Lite"? Something from your furtive imagination? You've owned a Curbow bass- congratulations - but that neither makes you an expert or a truly informed consumer when it comes to this product. And if you knew anything about the woods you toss about, you might know the differences between maple and birch/spruce and how this is precisely that material. This isn't maple in any form and the grain surface proves it.

    Don't come in here with a half-assed opinons and attempt to screw with this sale.
     
  13. Ronen

    Ronen

    Feb 9, 2003
    Milky Way Galaxy
    Hi,
    I own a 1994 international exotic petite fretless which I bought new. I've been following the Curbow basses history over the years and my observation is that this is with no doubt an original USA made Curbow bass.
    There was indeed a material called Rockwood lite in use. I know it for a fact as I discussed about it with Doug Somervell. I don't know when and how many basses were built using it. It is much lighter than the "old" Rockwood but by no means inferior. I can't say if this is what this bass has but I wouldn't care if I consider buying it. This is a ridicules deal here guys. It's practically free.
     
  14. mikezimmerman

    mikezimmerman Supporting Member

    Apr 29, 2001
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Greg did in fact start using a material called "Rockwood Lite" on some basses that was different from the original Rockwood. It was, as Biggs says, a maple (I believe) laminate that was impregnated with resin but not pressurized in the same way the original Rockwood was so it had most of the same characteristics but didn't weigh as much (hence the name). At least a few people had Greg replace their original Rockwood necks with Rockwood Lite, I know--I think Adam Nitti's Petite 6 had a Roockwood Lite neck at one point, but I may be mistaken. Greg and I talked about it when spec'ing my 6-string, but we ended up just using regular Rockwood.

    The 8-string Curbow fretless that bassmonkee had built and that I later owned also had a Rockwood Lite neck, and it was just as good as regular Rockwood from what I could see.

    On your bass, the fretboard looks like regular "rose" colored Rockwood, and the rest looks like Rockwood Lite. I've never seen regular Rockwood in a "maple" color, though I could be wrong about that. I believe the "natural" color for regular (birch-based) Rockwood looks like the neck on Tom Bowlus' early Curbow Petite ( http://s16.photobucket.com/albums/b6/tombowlus/Curbow Petite 5/?action=view&current=IMG_1958.jpg ).

    Mike
     
  15. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA
    Mike speaks the truth. This does appear to be Rockwood lite, but the only difference is that it is a lighter material that doesn't weigh a ton. The fretboard appears to be the regular Rockwood.

    Oh, and jpbiggs--Curbow never once laminated or dyed his own rockwood necks. I still have a brochure he gave me from back when I would visit his shop regularly with the different color options that were available from the place he sourced the rockwood.

    Rockwood lite should in no way be considered a "cheaper" version, or a "less legitimate" version of Rockwood. It's simply a different formula that is lighter, and, IMHO, a bit more resonant.


    EDIT: The pickups are likely Lindy Fralin pickups. When Dave Siff was having his Curbow Jazz built, Greg got two sets of pickups, and I think the other set went into this bass.
     
  16. Since the origins of this bass are still in question - and whatever shred of reputation I still have here on TB too, I've got an email in to Doug Somervell to put to rest the questions people have of this bass.

    Mike, I do believe the fretboard is what you describe. It's certainly a tinted material - sort of a mahogany color and that's not a natural thing with that particular grain. It also has a little higher gloss level than the back wood. I've seen one example of what could be called "natural" Rockwood and this certainly appeared similiar. That natural color was on a guitar I saw in a Guitar Center here in Atlanta about 6 years or so back. Thank you for your help.

    I did not know anything about Rockwood Lite. I looked over the old copies of Greg's website that I had and I did some more research without finding anything on that term. This is the only Curbow instrument I've owned but not the first I've handled. I'm unclear as to whether Doug specifically stated it was Rockwood I or something came up while I was talking with Margaret closing the sale. If nothing was stated, then I assumed from the fretboard finish it was all Rockwood.
     
  17. The Rockwood Lite explanation works really well with the fact that this bass has next to no neck weight! I just now put the two characteristics together in my head. Even Dave Siff's Curbow Jazz had a little more weight on the neck end but it wasn't out of balance and I always chalked that up to the petit headstock design he used for that one.

    Hey Jason, remember the 6 string Jazz Greg brought to the TBGT at the house? that thing weighed something less than 7 lbs.! Was that a Rockwood Lite neck? I seem to remember it being naturally colored.

    Thanx guys!
     
  18. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA
    Yep. That was also a Rockwood Lite neck.
     
  19. mikezimmerman

    mikezimmerman Supporting Member

    Apr 29, 2001
    Omaha, Nebraska
    I would not say there's any reason to doubt the origins of the bass. I remember it being listed in Greg's shop back when the Curbow site was up, and talking to Doug about it when we were building my Curbow Jazz 5, and I remember when Margaret put it up for sale and you got it. Whether Rockwood or Rockwood Lite, there's no question that's a Curbow neck and it's made of some Rockwood variety--the laminates alone are enough to show that.

    This looks to me like a great bass with all the benefits of Greg's Rockwood necks and his wonderful building talents in a more "traditional" look. And it's a bargain, to boot!
     

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