Growl!! ??

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by jpoprock, Jun 14, 2005.

  1. jpoprock


    Jun 7, 2005
    Kokomo, IN
    This may be a dufus question, but what is it that causes one's bass sound to have a bit of growl? Is it any one specific thing? I'm kind of talking the classic "rock" All-Tube Ampeg with P-Bass thru an 810 cab type of sound (the rig I can't afford to own). Can that same sound be acheived w/ a smaller rig? Could one just use a pedal dialed in ever so slightly?

    If you want, I can upload a sound clip that kinda elludes to the sound I'm wanting... but I can't break the bank to get it.

    I'm now thinking about getting the Eden Nemesis 320W head and running it into an Avatar 210NEO a 8ohms... and I might pick up an Avatar 15 or another 210NEO if I need it. Am I asking to fly to the moon in a paper airplane?

    I was going to spring for the Thunderfunk, but I think it's overkill right now (unless I get lucky and find a used one, which isn't likely). I'll put it on the GAS list! I've heard these new Nemesis heads are very "Eden like". But what does THAT mean? Clean and warm? Kind of "tubey" sounding? NO GROWL at all? Just wondering.

    Below is a link to the kind of sound I'm wanting. I have a Pbass that kinda does this sound naturally. One is just an edit of the full song, so you can get the point quicker. I included the full song as well. It's a B-Side by a band called the Killers.
    When I heard that bass sound, I was like "YES! that is what I want!" Of course, there are a ton more that i want too though! :D


  2. I believe growl is from:

    a. hotter pickups
    b. more treble
    c. type of string such as R/W with lots of timbre.
  3. I dunno, there are quite a few ways to get growl - overdrive pedal, a warwick bass or an overdriven tube head - these all have a natural, classic growl to them, although without a doubt, the cheapest way is to go with a pedal and just experiment with a whole bunch until u find one which gives the growl you are looking for...

    However: the recording you specified doesn't sound like a distortion pedal... and I seriously doubt its a warwick... an overdriven tube simulator will give you that sound though. Its more of a gritty sound than a growl to my ears, but thats just my opinion.

    what equipment does he play with?
  4. lowphatbass

    lowphatbass ****

    Feb 25, 2005
    west coast
    I have seen the oversized soundproof amp cabinets that were built into a major studio, one comes to mind. These were built specifically so that the bass tracks that were recorded through a D.I. live could later be ran through a HUGE Ampeg stack and miced to achieve the desired sound, and were built specifically for that amp and cab! What this tells me is with all the bells and whistles(and believe me, there are ALOT!) at a major studio's disposal there is nothing like the real thing. You may be able to hold yourself off for a while with a pedal but now that you have that sound in your ear and you know what you want you better start saving!!
  5. jpoprock


    Jun 7, 2005
    Kokomo, IN
    Cool. I found this from Bass Player Mag:

    “I love the punch and grit of a pick,” says Stoermer, mostly a pick player himself, “and that comes a lot from McCartney. I do a lot of unconscious palm muting. I love how you can instantly get that clunky tone with shorter notes. It’s a great sound.” Stoermer’s entire instrument collection consists of two Fender basses: an American-made stock 2004 Jazz Bass, and his constant companion, a black Geddy Lee Jazz Bass. Mark strings both basses with medium-gauge GHS Boomers and tunes down by a half-step. He runs his basses into an Ampeg SVT Classic with an Ampeg 8x10 cabinet. “Live, I sometimes beef it up with a Boss DS-1 distortion pedal,” he explains, “and I use a Boss GE-7 EQ pedal to take out some of the treble.” Mark also employs a Sovtek Big Muff pedal live on “Andy, You’re a Star.”

    I guess "gritty" is what you'd call it then. Perhaps I don't know the sound that is considered "Growl" then? Either way, I think I'll try to pick up a pedal of some kind to just blend a little with.

  6. 44me


    Jun 17, 2002
    Bedford, NH USA
    I can’t listen to your sound clip now (no speakers on the computer I’m at), but I think the classic rock growl is primarily from a tube amp power stage just starting to go into saturation. Obviously the particular cab, bass, pickup, strings all contribute, but I think the tube power stage is the dominant factor. That said, you may be able to get close to what you want with the appropriate pedal.

    - John
  7. try getting a sansamp Bass Driver DI, i got one to add a pile of growl to my setup before i got my ampeg, i still use it tho!
  8. jpoprock


    Jun 7, 2005
    Kokomo, IN
    I used to have a Sans Amp DI and sold it like a fool. HA! It added quite a bit of grit.. not to mention it really fattened up my sound. I thought my old Ampeg rig sounded great until I used the tube emulation from that bad boy. That it was god of thunder!

    I have an Avalon U5 DI now, but it doesn't add any kind of "Growl".

  9. TheChariot


    Jul 6, 2004
    Boston, MA
    I was reading down the list and thinking "Isn't ANYONE gonna recommend the BDDI?!?!" :cool:

    +1 for the Sansamp. No, its not a tube fullstack, but I promise you its a step in the direction your looking to go in.
  10. you ever tried a sansamp with a tube stack ?

    some people might not like it, but, woof :cool:
  11. Plain Old Me

    Plain Old Me

    Dec 14, 2004
    I have tons of growl when using my Traben 5er through a Mesa 400+ and EV 215. Growl is definately a characteristic of some good tubes, and a Sansamp can get pretty close to tube growl. You can get some pretty good growl from your bass as well; my Traben is quite growly with the stock pups.