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Hadrien Feraud - scary new talent

Discussion in 'Bassists [BG]' started by Mike Flynn, May 9, 2006.


  1. Hey - I've been listening to the new John McLaughlin fusion project 'Industrial Zen' on preview copy and it's a truly smoking album - full of serious playing a great tunes/perfromances. Bass-wise Matt Garrison and Tony Grey both make great contributions - but the two solo spots for bass are given to Hadrien Feraud who I know virtually nothing about but lest to say he's absolutely awesome. Kind of a mix between Bona and Garrison in terms of sound and style this kid is amazing - he plays some beautiful stuff on the first tune 'For Jaco' and there's another great really scary solo spot on the 'Senior CS' - have a listen here:

    http://www.abstractlogix.com/xcart/product.php?productid=21320

    The album has loads of tasty bass playing on and I know Hadrian was at NAMM this year - there's a link on Scott Perazza's website - but this guy is really great jazz fusion dude.

    Just thought some of you would like to know

    Mike
     
  2. Thanks for the update!

    Hadrien Feraud is fast on his hands! He does sound a bit like Bona the fretlees.

    -Christian
     
  3. DaveBeny

    DaveBeny

    Mar 22, 2000
    London, UK
  4. Baryonyx

    Baryonyx Banned

    Jul 11, 2005
    Marathon Man
    I'm certainly going to be picking this album up when I can, and this Hadrien Feraud character just adds more incentive for me!
     
  5. That's a cool interview - even though the translation sucks - the guy seems very mature for his age and believe me his playing is wicked - the album is the best thing McLaughlin has done since Que Alegria - I've played it quite alot and oit really is great.

    Cheers

    Mike
     
  6. narud

    narud Supporting Member

    Mar 15, 2001
    santa maria,california
    ok, so this guy is scary good but if you would have told me that was garrison on bass i wouldnt think twice. the guy both in playing and tone sounds exactly like matt. whatever happened to developing your own voice?

    i love matt garrison,gary willis, john patitucci, etc because they came up with something and they sound like themselves. i dont feel the same way about the sound-a-likes.
     
    Mr_O'B, andruca and bass nitro like this.
  7. j-raj

    j-raj Bassist: Educator/Soloist/Performer Supporting Member

    Jan 14, 2003
    Indianapolis, IN
    very fluid player!
     
  8. I completely agree - but if I sounded like Matt Garrison when I was 21 I'd be half-way happy with that...he's very young and the fact McLaughlin wanted him on his record after just hearing a demo the guy sent him speaks volumes - give him some time I say.

    Also Narud when can we hear some more stuff from you man? The stuff you posted a while back was really great - I'd love to hear some more - I;m finally getting somewhere with my own jazzy quartet but I like to hear what others are doing - for ideas etc =- PM me if you have any MP3s I'd love to hear them.

    Take it easy

    Mike
     
  9. narud

    narud Supporting Member

    Mar 15, 2001
    santa maria,california
    yeah, but hes already super develped in sounding like matt and he basically got the job because of it. he doesnt really have a reason to develop a sound now. the one thing i can say is at least hes doing that style REALLY well. now he can join the other cats in nyc with imperials tuned e-c :ninja:

    ive actually got some really cool stuff in the works now that my band is based in L.A. and has a new lineup. pm me your email address and ill send you a couple things to check out.
     
  10. janekbass

    janekbass

    Jan 28, 2004
    Los Angeles
    Founder and CEO of http://bassstudio.janekgwizdala.com
    Being "one of those individuals, with my fodera tuned E-C", I would say the first thing he has to do before moving here is change most of the stuff he's playing. There's no room in NYC for yet another Jaco clone, Garrison Clone etc. I fell right into the Garrison thing when I moved here, but it didn't take long to realize that no one would hire me if I sound like him. The reason John Hired the dood was because he sounded just like jaco and that's what the one song needed. He was only meant to play on one tune at first. There's no way you can go through your life making a living as a bass player because you were right for one song on a Johnny mac album in 2006. People are very honest in New York. Sometimes brutaly so. It won't take long of living here for him to change his style and stop sounding like countless other young players. He'll not be getting any work unless he does. Took me a minute to work it out, but it's a natural progression. I wasted the first couple of years of living here trying to sound too much like other people. I'm now incredibly fortunate to be working with Mike Stern on a regular basis, and he encourages me and all that play with him to develope our own sound. He pushes us, discusses music, works on new ways to play songs, transcribes all manner of music to develope it for a unique voice, and is completely open to everything.

    Why on earth would anyone want to "do a style, REALLY well" that isn't their own? that seems to negate the whole point of making music.

    This is just my opinioin for what it's worth. I would like to hear what people have to say on the matter. Perhaps I'm doing it all wrong. I would really like to find out. I'm constantly in search of answers to some pretty big questions that seem to get harder to answer these days.

    Janek
     
    andruca likes this.
  11. Wilbyman

    Wilbyman

    Sep 10, 2003
    Parkersburg, WV
    Janek, it's an interesting dilemma man...some people develop their own voice by the time they turn 21. Some don't. Most (pro) players have time to develop that voice before they get on a McLaughlin record and get pegged as a clone. "Be careful what you wish for because you might just get it."

    I wonder how different Patitucci's career would be if he would have gotten tapped while he was his in Jaco phase...

    At any rate, I'll agree go on record agreeing with Narud...the kid is scary good. Narud should know, because he's scary good too!
     
  12. fretless Bob

    fretless Bob If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail.

    Nov 27, 2005
    Harrow, London, U.K
    speaking of gear, whats he using? anyone know


    Dave
     
  13. fretless Bob

    fretless Bob If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail.

    Nov 27, 2005
    Harrow, London, U.K
    just bought the album off itunes and the other tracks with Tony Grey and Matt Garrison on are great, i almost prefer them.


    Dave
     
  14. fretless Bob

    fretless Bob If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail.

    Nov 27, 2005
    Harrow, London, U.K
    i was just surprised at how Jaco/ Bona his tone is, i thought he was playing a Fodera, he just really blew me away,

    guess that sort of thing ia really in the hands


    Dave
     
  15. I'm not hearing Garrison at all. I do severely hear Jaco, though. He seems to be a really good player.
     
  16. fretless Bob

    fretless Bob If you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail.

    Nov 27, 2005
    Harrow, London, U.K

    i saw him play at the london guitar show this year, he is the sh*t!

    didnt know about the perfect pitch though, i so would love perfect pitch, the thought of being able to tell someone what note they just tapped on a table would be so heavy.


    Dave
     
  17. janekbass

    janekbass

    Jan 28, 2004
    Los Angeles
    Founder and CEO of http://bassstudio.janekgwizdala.com


    Mabis,

    first of all, before you tell me what I should and shouldn't learn from someone, maybe you want to at least spell my name correctly. My name is Janek, not Hanak. and I don't know how old you think you have to be to be "getting on", but I'm not. I'm 27 years old, have all my own hair and teeth, and have sex without the aid of viagra.

    I also know Hadrian, I have played with him and never disputed the fact that he is a really nice guy. I got on really well with him and we had a lot to talk about musically and otherwise. I was also not aiming my post at him. Had I wanted to tell Hadrien what I posted, I would have picked up the phone and called him. I'm sure he already knows all of what I said as he is a pretty mature guy. The post was aimed at people who, in my opinion, don't listen for anything new anymore. They want to hear the same stuff re-done by some new kid that they can geek out over for another five years and never move on. I wish I had had people opening my ears to originality when I first started playing music. It's the most important part of improvised music, and many other art forms for that matter.

    Hadrian is a great guy, and I hope to be able to call him my friend one day should we ever get the chance to live in the same city. He knows what the deal is. He's the one doing it. It's all the people who look in on things and are not in the scene that tend to come up with these crazy statements, as they have a romanticized picture of what the scene is like.

    Now, if you want to be specific about what is in my playing and tell me I transcribed John P's stuff, I am well within my right to tell you to go to hell and that you have cabbage in your ears. Maybe a little harsh, but it does piss me off when people haven't done any home work for themselves and tell me what I've been doing for the last ten years.

    first of all, I have never transcribed a John Patitucci solo in my life. I can't stand the sound of his bass after he stopped playing the Ken Smith and haven't been able to listen to his records with transcribing his solos in mind. I have tried to never aspire to sound like another bass player in a soloistic sense. Any similarities you might associate with my playing and patitucci's will come from our shared love for the music of John Coltrane. We have both done extensive research and transcriptions of Trane's music and that comes out in our playing. Don't take my word for it, ask him yourself. Do you think I pull this crap out of the air? I signed my life over to playing this music. i work on this stuff every day that passes. I'm interested in other musicians, their views, their thoughts, their process. I just asked John one day what he had worked on as a younger musician. So please don't insult me by telling me what I have and haven't transcribed. You can come to New York, or catch me live somewhere wherever you live and take a look at my transcription books yourself. I always carry at least two on the road that I'm working on at any given time and I have dozens at home. not a single solo of John's anywhere.


    So......Was it really that wrong of me to make a statement coming from personal experience, hard times, good times, living in NYC, sounding like someone else, trying not to sound like someone else? I wish I had read a post like that when I was 17 years old and first picking up a bass guitar. I would have been thinking about having a unique voice from a much earlier age. Maybe I should just keep my mouth shut and not offer any advice whatsoever. but maybe that is defeating the point of a forum and an open and free discussion.

    How about checking out some music that existed before john patitucci? and maybe figuring out that john didn't originate those lines and that phrasing. He just took that language, as I am trying to, and developed it into his own music.

    And before someone jumps on my back and tells me I hate john, Don't. I love him to bits. He's an incredible musician. His recent work on acoustic bass with Wayne Shorter is some of the most incredible music I've heard in a long time. Just cos I don't like the way some fusion record from the 80's with a yamaha bass sounded, doesn't mean to say I don't dearly love the guy as a musician and friend.

    Janek


    www.myspace.com/janekgwizdalaproject
     
  18. janekbass

    janekbass

    Jan 28, 2004
    Los Angeles
    Founder and CEO of http://bassstudio.janekgwizdala.com
    There is no "next charlie parker" charlie died in 1955 and is not coming back in the shape of a dreadlocked african bass player with Joe Zawinul. If you're talking about what Charlie Parker did for the saxophone, for improvised music and for jazz in general, how do you think Linley is going to do this on the bass? I don't for one second dispute the fact that Linley is a badass!!!! bass player. I've seen him play and it's smoking. But I haven't heard an album by him, any writing by him, or any life changing or music history changing advances in Jazz or in the electric bass by him. I would love to get your perspective on hearing him play and talk about this further.

    Cheers,

    Janek.


    P.S. I'm curious to know what the attraction of something being played twice as fast as something else is? and my sister has perfect pitch and isn't about to change the world of music with it.......

    www.myspace.com/janekgwizdalaproject
     
  19. jerry

    jerry Doesn't know BDO Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 13, 1999
    Watch out Mabis, I've made the mistake a sticking my foot in my mouth here.......and it sure didn't taste very good.;)
     
  20. Mabis2012

    Mabis2012

    Mar 25, 2006
    in which respect?
     

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