Hagstrom Pickup Issue

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by LSquared, Aug 10, 2009.


  1. LSquared

    LSquared

    Jul 28, 2009
    SW Illinois USA
    I recently purchased a vintage 60’s Hagstrom HIIB bass, which I’ve been cleaning up. So far, I’ve only encountered 1 serious problem: The bridge P/U doesn’t work. The neck P/U is fine, all the switches seem to work fine.

    If I push down on the bridge P/U just right, it almost works…. This led me to expect a loose connection. But when I opened it up, the connections look ok (except for 40 years of aging and some ugly soldering). Measuring the impedance (from open switch to the grounded side of the P/U), I get pretty much a short on the “bad” pickup, compared with 700-900k Ohms on the good P/U.

    Any thoughts / suggestions? Are these pickups sealed, or do the enclosures pop-open? Anybody know of any form/fit replacements? Are there folks out there who do rewinds?

    THANKS for any info.

    under the pickguard:
    3806472440_a45ae24dd3.jpg

    Close-up, bridge P/U
    3806470902_48f5d4dd09.jpg

    Front side of bridge P/U
    3805652749_161a2bef7e.jpg
     
  2. LSquared

    LSquared

    Jul 28, 2009
    SW Illinois USA
    Update for anybody watching:
    I got to thinking about all that ugly solder, perhaps it could be causing the problem.... With all the solder globs and oxidation and such, I wondered if there might be a short at the switch... Bottom line: I removed the mess of solder from the pickup, and unsoldered the pickup wire from the switch... and now it reads a very reasonable 14k Ohms. But it was't just a short at the switch, but also a cold-solder joint "open" where the pickup wire was connected to ground.

    Think I'll end up removing all the solder / wires from this, clean everything up, and redo it.
     
  3. GlennW

    GlennW

    Sep 6, 2006
    14K is about what mine measured, so that looks good.

    As you've probably noticed, Hagstrom was into shielding...the cavity, the pickguard. They also shield the coil under the cover (see pic). The blue wires are hot. The red wire gets soldered to the baseplate and goes through the hole where it is also soldered to the start of the coil and to a metal strip which surrounds the coil.

    I think your bass has been worked on because of the green ground lead on the neck pickup. Also, I think there were three little black plastic boobies which poke through the baseplate to secure the cover. It looks like the middle boobies are missing from yours, suggesting previous investigation.

    I've only been inside of one of those pickups (had a few Hags), which I bought dead with the baseplate already disconnected. I did manage to fix it, but I really can't give any tips on baseplate removal. It doesn't look like you'll need to do that anyway.

    What color is it?
     
  4. LSquared

    LSquared

    Jul 28, 2009
    SW Illinois USA
    Thanks for the info, Glen.... very interesting on the sheilding.

    I agree that mine must've been worked on. Between the gree wire and some of the really bad soldering. Now that I have the pickup figured out, though, I think everything else works. Just need to get it all cleaned up good, and reconnected and all.

    I'm looking forward to getting it all put back together so I can start using it.
     
  5. GlennW

    GlennW

    Sep 6, 2006
    Glad to help.

    I've seen some Hagstrom pickguards which had an entire aluminum bottom layer; can't remember if they were early or later.

    In case your bridge ground isn't there, there are two holes which are drilled and intersect to make a shallow V. One starts by the output jack, the other starts at one of the right bridge screws in the wood. I've seen the wire run to either hole, so there's no set way they did it. Some go to the big back screw which holds the bridge down; others go to the little front screw in the body which supports the height adjustment screw.
     
  6. LSquared

    LSquared

    Jul 28, 2009
    SW Illinois USA
    There is a wire coming from the bridge area, into the cavity for the input jack. I'm presuming that's the bridge ground. It was not actually soldered to anything, I'm guessing it was looped around one of the screws holding the cover.... make sense?
     
  7. GlennW

    GlennW

    Sep 6, 2006
    I'm not sure of the official way (been a while), but if it's long enough I'd solder it to the negative lug on the output jack.
     
  8. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jun 15, 2021

Share This Page