Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Hammond B3 question

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [DB]' started by Phil Smith, Jan 4, 2002.


  1. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    I was hanging out at Birdland last night, chatting with a charming woman and listening to the Peter Bernstein Quartet, featuring Joshua Redman on Sax. The bass parts were played on the organ and I was told that the player uses his feet to do this, is this true? I didn't get a chance to take a look at his feet though prior to the show I did notice a number of pedals. Can someone enlighten me?
     
  2. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Believe it or not, this is probably true. Each summer at the Aebersold camps, I get to watch Hank Marr do this with his trio, and it's an unbelievable sight. Legit organ players are also expected to play bass lines with their feet using pedals, but for the most part the lines are not as harmonically challenging as the walking lines for uptempo tunes in jazz would be.
     
  3. Monte

    Monte

    Jan 9, 2001
    New Albany, MS
    Unlessyour name is Joey DeFrancesco or (until last year) Charles "The Mighty Burner" Earland. I would gladly sit out a set in favor of thise guys.......

    Monte
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    A lot of the "greats" in Jazz organ do this - like Larry Young and Jimmy Smith . Try - Larry Young with John McLaughlin and Jimmy Smith's Organ Trios with Kenny Burrell are legendary - Guitar/Organ plus a drummer is a staple of Bluesy Jazz on loads of recordings.
     
  5. dhosek

    dhosek

    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    Actually, Hank plays the bass line with his left hand. He sets the drawbars on the pedals to just include the lowest stop then thumps his lowest pedal rhythmically along with the bassline to add some rhythmic accent to his bassline.

    -dh (Hank was my combo's advisor this past summer)
     
  6. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    This explains much...I always wondered how he could get those lines out without moving very much! The thing that always blows me away about organ players is the sense of balance and independence they have to have in order to do all of that stuff. One of the guys I play with a lot is a pianist who doubles on organ (you may have seen him at the camp last year...does the name Todd Hildreth ring a bell?), and it always blows me away how he can walk the lines that he does and solo at the same time without the time suffering too much.
     
  7. dhosek

    dhosek

    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    Now there are some organists who will play 3 or more independent lines using the pedals. The organist at my church http://www.holynamecathedral.org/music/soria.htm
    is mind-blowing with his abilities. There have been pieces that called for two lines in the right hand (a la the Bach 3-part inventions), another in the left hand, plus 2 lines played on the pedals. And any time there was a rest for a limb, that limb was called upon to adjust stops. Astonishing to watch. Me, I'm hopeless without a sustain pedal to disguise my painfully sloppy keyboard technique. Perhaps that should be my New Year's resolution, although an on-line quiz offered that my resolution should be

    [​IMG]