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Hard Jazz pieces

Discussion in 'Music [DB]' started by hobb185, Sep 30, 2008.


  1. hobb185

    hobb185

    Feb 16, 2008
    I am in a jazz combo and i am getting a little bored playing the music it is all so easy. Does anybody have suggestions for some more advanced sheet music that would challenge everybody.
     
  2. I like Nardis, Giant Steps, Waltz for Debby, My Favorite Things, or you could just arrange a piece in a difficult way.
     
  3. Adam Booker

    Adam Booker Supporting Member

    May 3, 2007
    Boone, NC
    Endorsing Artist: D'Addario Strings, Remic Microphones
    After 20 years of playing, I still don't think of any piece as "easy." I love how everyone rolls their eyes at "Girl from Ipanema" and then proceeds to choke on the bridge. I like to think of any tune as another chance to say something new, groove a a little harder, try a different fingering, etc. Take it up a half-step, try to play it in 7, or 5, or alternate 7 on the A section and 5 on the bridge. Always strive for something more each time you play a song, and you never get bored with it.
     
  4. Have you ever considered writing your own tunes?
     
  5. Elemetal

    Elemetal

    Mar 10, 2006
    I'm asumming you're playing written charts. Play some charts with just the changes so you can make up your own lines. That never gets old 'cause you can always look for different things to play. If thats getting boring for you then you need to take up a new hobby or new style.
     
  6. Marc Piane

    Marc Piane

    Jun 14, 2004
    Chicago
    +1!!!

    I played a gig Friday and we played Softly as in a Morning Sunrise which could be considered an easy tune. The sax player, who is a killer player, played a solo that still has me thinking. It ain't the tune. It's how you approach it.

    btw Chris (if you read this thread) the sax player was Jarrard Harris. He says hi.
     
  7. newbold

    newbold

    Sep 21, 2008
    Toronto
    Why not play some Sun Ra?

    Some Herbie Hancock from Man-Child done straight ahead?

    You could take a neoclassical/folk/jazz piece (listen to hagens-gismonti live in montreal (ECM) perhaps) and break the 2 parts into enough range for the entire band.

    (upright and 10 string(individual strings) classical guitar)

    If you're worried about how easy a piece is then you're a big fat Jazz nerd.

    Just remember to use a pocket protector or you'll lose everybody.
     
  8. Chrix

    Chrix

    Apr 9, 2004
    Brooklyn
    Nail on the head. Every time I start to get a little tired of a tune like "Autumn Leaves," I listen to someone like Keith Jarrett or Bill Evans play it and realize it's still a great tune. You should strive to bring something new to it every time. One of the hardest parts of playing this music is to always make it interesting, particularly after playing the songs thousands of times.

    This doesn't mean you shouldn't explore Wayne Shorter or Kenny Wheeler tunes or the like, and writing your own tunes are a great way to go too, but don't let yourself think the current music you're playing is boring or lame or vanilla or whatever. You need to put everything into it whether it's "In the Mood" or "ESP."
     
  9. I think you're a genius.
     
  10. cnltb

    cnltb

    May 28, 2005
    There's sheet music available for download on Greg Osby's site.
    Other than that, do transcriptions or write your own I'd say.
     
  11. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    I always find that the hardest things to get are based on rhythmic syncopations or cross-rhythms - why not have a look at some Afro-Cuban rhythms?

    Maybe look at Jerry Gonzalez Fort Apache band - a current fave of mine for using these kinds of rhythms in Jazz!:)
     
  12. +1 on the Genius comment.. Although a bit Snarky...

    All of you who are offering constructive advice...my hats are off to all of you. I've been playing and recording for the last 30 or so years..... and I don't view any tune as "easy" or "vanilla"

    Here's a thought. This might get you to see where you are really at in terms of time, intonation, feel and of course; taste.

    Start recording how awesomely you play all these "easy" tunes. I look forward to hearing you with Chick or Herbie real soon!

    All the Best:ninja:
     
  13. Thanks for the tip. Fortunately, my comments on TBDB don't revolve around your judgements.
    What exactly is " Snarky " ?:D
     
  14. gmarcus

    gmarcus Supporting Member

    Apr 4, 2003
    Confirmation - by - Charlie Parker!!!
     
  15. You beat me to it Paul! :D
     
  16. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    Richmond, CA
    Don't forget you can always up the tempo! :)
     
  17. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    Up the tempos by 100 BPM and if thats too easy try 100 BPM hundred more.
     
  18. manutabora

    manutabora

    Aug 14, 2007
    Iowa City, IA
    Dude, I should be taking lessons from you!!
    If you really do need something more challenging, maybe some Charlie Parker? However, I would tend to agree with the others here that you probably just need to approach the music better. There's always something to improve upon.
     
  19. "Thanks for the tip. Fortunately, my comments on TBDB don't revolve around your judgements.
    What exactly is " Snarky " ?:D[/quote]"

    "Snarky" indicates at least a tiny bit of sarcasm....

    If you actually meant that you truly think this person is a genius, then I misunderstood your comment. I was not judging what you said merely agreeing with the percieved sentiment:ninja:
     
  20. A " TINY bit of sarcasm" ?
     

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