1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Hardwired IEM question

Discussion in 'Live Sound [BG]' started by smklassen0977, Mar 3, 2016.


Tags:
  1. So I've been throwing around the idea of IEM's .. the wireless ones are too high for what I want to spend and the less expensive ones - well, I just don't have a low end one. So I figure since I'm already tethered to my amp with a 1/4" cord I might as well be hardwired to a headphone amp with my mix going through it.. My question is how to get the mix from the board back to my headphone amp... my thought was come from our board aux out (which is 1/4") to a DI Box (the DI box is to balance the signal and eliminate any noise I might get from using a super long 1/4" cable) to the snake return, then have an xlr cable go to the headphone amp.. problem is the input labeled mix (on all the ones I saw) are 1/4" .. could I use the "Mic Thru" or "Mic Input" ?

    -Confused...
     
  2. s0c9

    s0c9 Supporting Member

    Jan 9, 2014
    Ft.Worth/Dallas
    1964 Audio artist, Fractal Audio Beta Tester
    you don't need/want a DI in that chain.. go straight from the AUX feed into the headphone amp unless you are 40 feet away.
    Many AUX outs are TRS (balanced). If yours are not, you can go into a DI then use a transformer from XLR to 1/4" to connect to the headphone amp.
    adjust levels to taste...
    There are lots of decent (small) headphone amps out there from Rolls, Behringer and others.
     
    Geri O likes this.
  3. TedH

    TedH

    Dec 6, 2014
    Westchester, NY
    Agreed. I did board straight to headphone amp, including my signal (got stereo that way with a Y splitter into the headphone amp). I have the option of taking the board to one input and my DI thru to the other input.

    I use the LD Systems HPA1 headphone amp, which is very similar to the Behringer one. No issues at all, and in hindsight, I would've just gotten the Berhringer and saved a few bucks and still had a limiter.
     
  4. This should be a sticky by now there are so many "how do I" threads now. Search is your friend here.
     
  5. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
  6. Thanks for the feedback.. Yeah.. not sure if the out on the board is balanced.. I'll have to check that.. Most shows we do, the board isn't too far away.. typically closer than 40' - so a long sheilded 1/4 cable should do it.. I've often heard you don't want to go more that 20' since you risk picking up noise..

    What do you mean by "transformer"? a simple XLR to 1/4 adapter?
     
  7. Funny you mention this.. I always try to dodge these posts and search extensively but I couldn't find anything relevant/straightforward to the question I'm asking.. After-all.. isn't discussion what it's all about?

    This could be the "sticky' ;)
     
  8. elgecko likes this.
  9. SteveC

    SteveC Moderator Staff Member

    Nov 12, 2004
    North Dakota
    WE use the Rolls box at church where we are hardwired for IEM's. It works great. We use the aux return TRS to the Rolls. We don't use the mic in and stuff as we can mix our IEM's with our iPhones. They are great little boxes and very inexpensive. Great way to have wired IEM's.
     
  10. s0c9

    s0c9 Supporting Member

    Jan 9, 2014
    Ft.Worth/Dallas
    1964 Audio artist, Fractal Audio Beta Tester
    yes, exactly..
     
  11. So I got my ROLLS headphone amp and tried it with the board.. The AUX send on the board is stereo/balanced so I used a stereo 1/4" to the stereo 1/4" on the ROLLS headphone amp and I could only get a signal in the left ear.. To eliminate any issues with cords, the headphone amp, the IEMs, etc.. I took a pair of stereo headphones (not my IEMs) and plugged them directly in the the AUX send in the board with the same result - the left ear was only getting the signal... I then took a 1/4" stereo to XLR cable and plugged the 1/4" stereo end in the AUX send on the board and the XLR end went into the MIC input on the headphone amp, then I could hear both right and left out of the IEM's. Weird! Anyone know what might be going on here? I doesn't make any sense to me..
     
  12. praisegig

    praisegig Supporting Member

    Jul 7, 2008
    Stephenville, TX
    Did you check the Stereo/Mono jumper on the left side of the box?
     
  13. SteveC

    SteveC Moderator Staff Member

    Nov 12, 2004
    North Dakota
    This. Same thing happened to me when I first used it. It's set to stereo from the factory I believe. Get a little something to slide that dip over and you'll be all set.
     
  14. Cool.. I get a little antsy and don't read the manual.. I'll check that out..
     
  15. s0c9

    s0c9 Supporting Member

    Jan 9, 2014
    Ft.Worth/Dallas
    1964 Audio artist, Fractal Audio Beta Tester
    My dad always used to tell me... "if all else fails, read the manual!" or.. RTFM :)
     
  16. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    no such thing!

    it's either one or the other, and coming out of a PA board's aux it's balanced.
     
  17. s0c9

    s0c9 Supporting Member

    Jan 9, 2014
    Ft.Worth/Dallas
    1964 Audio artist, Fractal Audio Beta Tester
    uh? Stereo, TRS and balanced 1/4" are the SAME thing Walt!
    What's debatable is whether the AUX sends are balanced or not - many consoles are not!
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2016
  18. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    Absolutely not, c'mon man, you know this!

    A balanced out is not a "stereo" out, just because they both use 1/4" TRS is beside the point.
     
  19. s0c9

    s0c9 Supporting Member

    Jan 9, 2014
    Ft.Worth/Dallas
    1964 Audio artist, Fractal Audio Beta Tester
    True - I do know this - but I think you are splitting hairs.
    How many consoles have AUX outs that are XLR? Most - if not all - I know of are 1/4", even the digital ones. They may be balanced (or not). For brevity, I'll ignore that one can set up XLR output busses on the digital consoles as AUX equivalents.

    If balanced you will need a balanced (TRS - see pic below) 1/4" jack - otherwise known [to most] as a stereo 1/4" jack - to take advantage of that.
    No sense in confusing folks who don't know the real difference. :)

    upload_2016-3-15_9-47-11.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2016
  20. walterw

    walterw Supportive Fender Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 20, 2009
    alpha-music.com
    That was my only point; thinking it was a "stereo" plug or jack is what obviously confused the OP. It's not, it's a TRS plug, used for balanced lines and inserts and stereo headphones, none of which can be substituted for the other.
     
  21. s0c9

    s0c9 Supporting Member

    Jan 9, 2014
    Ft.Worth/Dallas
    1964 Audio artist, Fractal Audio Beta Tester
    but, but, but.. they're wired the same too :)
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.