Hardwood Floor Owners - advice sought

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by mrpackerguy, Dec 21, 2016.


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  1. mrpackerguy

    mrpackerguy Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Madison, Wisconsin
    We have 3 cats in the house - this is good to hear.
     
  2. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    I'm not equating a fad with "lowest common denominator". We all buy into fads at certain times, be it clothing, flooring, or hairstyles. My only advice is to avoid items like bamboo (that seem to have fad-ish qualities) when considering a major, largely permanent, home install.
     
  3. delta7fred

    delta7fred

    Jul 3, 2007
    England
    40 years ago I put a solid mahogany floor in my lounge and down the hallway to the bedrooms. I later carpeted the hallway because noise carried down to the bedrooms too easily.

    It took some serious abuse, castors that didn't always stay in their cups, high heels, and my eldest daughter who had a sit on car with hard plastic wheels when she was little. She would hang the tail out and apply opposite lock as she rounded the bends going round the furniture. The varnish looked like a race track, next time it was refinished you couldn't tell.

    It has been refinished a few times and still looks pretty good. I used to refinish it just before we went for our annual 2 week vacation to give the varnish plenty of time to harden.
     
    mrpackerguy likes this.
  4. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Moderator Staff Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    We put cork in our kitchen and dining room about eight years ago. We love it.

    -Mike
     
  5. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    I've been in kitchens like that. My dad built a house in the late 50's and the bedrooms had cork floors. I was in that house about 5 years ago and they were still in good shape. They last.
     
    MJ5150 likes this.
  6. Aberdumbie

    Aberdumbie

    Jan 22, 2016
    South Carolina
    We bought our house six years ago. Two stories. Top floor is where we live bottom floor is a play den and such but is also where my three dogs exit the house. I installed hardwood throughout myself...... Said all that to offer this. I used the thin snap together free floating stuff downstairs. The pathway to the dog door looks worn and scratched. I refresh it from time to time but it gets that dull worn look again in short order......... Upstairs, I used the high end 5/4 expensive nail in stuff. We do all our living up there and save for a few surface scratches and such, it still looks pretty danged good. It is bamboo and super hard. Dogs nails are tough on wood floors. After five years of use, I would recommend that you don't use the inexpensive floating stuff if your dogs are as much a part of your family as mine are.
     
  7. placedesjardins

    placedesjardins

    May 7, 2012
    Hardwood lasts way longer than laminate flooring and doesn't look bad when it gets dinged up. When laminate flooring gets dinged up, you'll see through the "fake wood printed layer" and to the compressed cardboard like material underneath.
    In 10 years, the laminate flooring is going to look like garbage. The wood flooring, you can always resurface.

    You might want to look into cork tile flooring.
     
    guy n. cognito likes this.
  8. Callused Finger

    Callused Finger

    Feb 22, 2007
    New York
    Wood is going to dent but every time my kid drops something heavy I cringe. If there are pets and kids involved get the hardest stuff you can. Darker and any shine will make things look even worse. Glad we went with something lighter and more on the matte finish side.

    Can't imagine dog claws dragging all over the place.


    image=http%3A%2F%2Fi1173.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fr600%2Fcharlieb777%2F2007_CCJV-1_zpsqmpkutms.png
     
  9. Gaolee

    Gaolee Official leathers tester and crash dummy

    One thing to be aware of is that those narrow plank white oak floors may be a veneer over a softwood subfloor. That's extremely common in houses built from about 1900 to around 1940. Maybe a little earlier, too, but I don't know because there are hardly any houses built before 1900 out here. A telltale is that there is an inlay around the outside, or perhaps a change in flooring direction. If you don't have that, you still may have an oak veneer floor. Look carefully for face nails. You can only resand and refinish those floors so many times before you sand right through the veneer. Here's the floor in our house:
    DSC_0058[1].JPG
     
    Jeff Scott and guitar ed like this.
  10. Gaolee

    Gaolee Official leathers tester and crash dummy

    Good to know it holds up. We put cork in our basement music room. That's the room in the house that gets the most use and abuse. I'm down there all the time.
     
  11. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    Since the OP is talking about installing new floors, I'm not sure this is much of an issue.
     
  12. Gaolee

    Gaolee Official leathers tester and crash dummy

    That's true. I was responding to Jeff Scott's comment about the floors in his kitchen. I wanted to make it clear that you have to be careful if you have narrow strip white oak floors in an older house. That's all. It's thread drift, to be sure. The point is that what looks like solid wood may not be, so somebody doesn't get tripped up.
     
  13. nutdog

    nutdog when I'm a good dog they sometimes throw me a bone

    Feb 19, 2009
    in the dog house
    Ours is about 10 years old. 3 teenagers, 2 dogs and a cat. I wouldn't say garbage...

    IMG_0154.JPG
     
  14. SirMjac28

    SirMjac28 Patiently Waiting For The Next British Invasion

    Aug 25, 2010
    The Great Midwest
    Original oak flooring in my 1869 built home if you can get real wood grab it. I wax it every six months or so my dog can't make a dent in it.
     
    MJ5150 likes this.
  15. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Moderator Staff Member

    Apr 12, 2001
    Olympia, WA
    What wax do you use?

    -Mike
     
    SirMjac28 likes this.
  16. SirMjac28

    SirMjac28 Patiently Waiting For The Next British Invasion

    Aug 25, 2010
    The Great Midwest
    I use Bona High Gloss
     
  17. mrpackerguy

    mrpackerguy Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Madison, Wisconsin
    After some consternation trying to find a time our local flooring store was open that we could actually get to (9-4:30 daily and no weekend times!) we finally made it and are looking at the offering from Armstrong in solid wood flooring - Hickory and 5" Solid Wide Plank (5 in. and up) Hardwood Flooring from Armstrong Flooring

    This local store employs all their installers.

    Sounds like the one tough task is going to be the demo of a large amount of ceramic tile in the kitchen-dining-2 hallways-and to the foyer.
     
  18. mrpackerguy

    mrpackerguy Supporting Member

    Jul 3, 2004
    Madison, Wisconsin
    UPDATE We decided on a different supplier and installer that was more reputable. He spent a lot of time with us. We're going with a site-finished 3/4" solid hickory floor in multiple lengths and multiple widths, 5", 4", 3", 2" in a random pattern on the entire first floor of our 2 story colonial. The hickory is a character wood with knots, streaks, sap lines, and dark to lighter pieces. About 900sq ft worth, with a high traffic finish, and a Bona brand stain in a medium brown color, not too dark. It's a 2 week installation. The first week is the actual hickory floor install. The second week is sanding, applying the finish, buffing, then waiting a day, then another round of finishing and buffing. About 9 days total. Then another 8 days to cure, but during that time we are told we can walk on it, preferably with socks, and felt on all furniture that goes down and no rugs to 2 weeks. The demo of our ceramic tile and pulling all the baseboards and plywood under the ceramic was estimated at $5700, but my daughter's boyfriend works house construction and he's going to do it for half that. It's going to end up in the $13k range with the demo and the installation and flooring.
     
  19. bolophonic

    bolophonic

    Dec 10, 2009
    Durham, NC
    I don't have much to add, but we ripped out approx 850 sq ft of tile and rot from our farm house and put in antique reclaimed oak removed from a demolished building and I think it cost about what $1.50 sq ft for the material and ~$2.00 sq ft to professionally refinish. I had to do the install, which was satisfying and saved me money. They look even better after two years of mojo. My whole house is relic'ed.
     
  20. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Aug 5, 2021

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