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Harmonization

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by cassanova, Mar 19, 2003.


  1. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    I was just curious to know the theory behind how two instruments harmonize with each other. Is it simply one playing the same key just an octave or two higher or is there more too it than that? Thanks
     
  2. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    Blimey that's a hell of a question... jazzbo, Ed, moley, ANYONE?!!

    :rolleyes:
     
  3. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Goodness, that's a pretty broad question!

    What is the context here, cass? What instruments, what style etc.?

    But, no, it's not just playing the same thing in a different octave. That's not really harmonization at all, I'd say - that's unison. To me, harmony implies that the instruments aren't playing the same notes (or the same notes an octave higher or lower etc.).

    But I don't really know how to answer that question in any kind of helpful way, without you elaborating the question!
     
  4. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    The article posted does a good job of explaining the process. If you want to know more get a book on arranging to find out what instruments to voice where.

    cassanova, the goal is usually to sound out a chord using different instruments to sound out different parts of the chord.

    Take this progression:

    Fmin7 Bb7 EbMaj7

    Two basses could harmonize this in a number of different ways. One bass plays the root, the other the seventh, one the root , the other the third, one the root the other the fifth.
     
  5. Mandobass

    Mandobass

    Nov 12, 2002
    Raleigh, NC
    yea i feel its more about harmonizing a group of notes and not just "how do i harmonize this note with that one."


    i tend to think chordally when harmonizing. just think of the notes in context.
     
  6. Harmonize - simultaneous playing of notes in a chord.

    Ok, so that's the dictionary-style definition, but I had a thought that I wanted to share, & hear your opinions.... In the use of harmony, the typically combined notes in the chord give consonance to the resulting sound. If the combined notes give dissonance, is it still technically a 'harmony'???
    :confused:
     
  7. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    i tend to go modal when thinking of harmonies

    i.e. if my melody is I, II, III, I, IV, V in C Ionian and I want to harmonise a third up I'll play I, II, III, I, IV, V in E Phrygian - for example.

    If you do it this way your harmony will be strictly diatonic... you could however want every note to have a perfect 5th harmony, tin which case you'd play the same pattern of intervals starting on the root a perfect 5th up.

    What i want to know is how would I go about creating a minor 3rd harmony of a CMajor melody?
     
  8. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Sure.

    Dissonance resolving to consonance is an important part of Western harmony. It doesn't have to be consonant to be described as harmony.
     
  9. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    You wouldn't :p

    I suppose what you mean is, harmonize a major melody as if it was minor?

    You could just use the third mode of whichever minor scale you wanna use - instead of E Phyrgian?
     
  10. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    Do you mean another melody voiced a minor third above the C Major melody?
     
  11. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK

    Well, it sounds fine if it's two screaming guitars playing riffs in minor pentatonic! Engwie Malmstein style!
     
  12. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    You that's the one... So my melody is clearly in C Ionian, but my harmony starts on the root a minor third up... i guess i'd just play the same intervals a m3 up?
     
  13. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    That may work if it's just two people singing or two instruments playing, but if you have a chordal instrument in the mix, you will have to have chords that work with the harmonized melody.
     
  14. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Parallel minor 3rds may work - but it depends what form of the minor you want to use to harmonize it.
     
  15. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    "what form" - explain dis to mee?!
     
  16. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Well y'know you got yer natural minor, harmonic minor and melodic minor... which are you gonna use?
     
  17. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    oh i see, sorry, i;m runnign aboot like a nutter at work today, i didnt fink...
     
  18. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    Just thought I would ask a question in this thread since it pertains to harmony instead of making a new thread.

    How would you go about harmonizing chromatic/passing tones/blue notes?
     
  19. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    Intrestin Q?

    I think it would depend on where the harmony is leading? If it's leading back to the tonic or into a dominant chord?

    You could create a modal harmony on your main melody, then hang on a note while the melody used chromatics. Dpending on which note you hung on the harmony of the passing tone could be consonant or dissonant... Does that make ANY sense?!

    :meh: