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Has there ever been a P-bass pickup shootout?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by rabid_granny, Apr 25, 2002.


  1. Has anyone ever encountered such a comparison/study?
     
  2. I don't know if it's been published by anyone.

    I've done something similar, though. I'm almost strictly a P basser, and every so often, I'll play as many P basses as I can and make notes on what I liked, what I didn't etc. all for knowledge of future purchases.

    If you are wondering about something specific, I can check my notes and let you know. PM or e-mail me if you are interested in my findings.
     
  3. Perhaps in the future I will replace the pickups in my P-bass. I was wondering if there were any major tonal differences .

    I haven't had a chance to test any passive after-market pickups.
     
  4. Planet Boulder

    Planet Boulder Hey, this is a private residence...man Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2001
    6,482 feet above sea level
    I once had impure thoughts. Oh, and I pluck my ear hair.
    Rabid: What year is your P-Bass? Is it a MIM, Squier or higher grade, American model?

    Just curious. Depending upon what you have, I'd recommend not replacing the pickups. Biggest mistake I ever made, bass-wise, was to replace the ones in my '82.
     
  5. barroso

    barroso

    Aug 16, 2000
    Italia
    the stock pickup in my American Precision is killer.
     
  6. I have a 1996 American Standard P-bass w/stock pickups.

    I also have 1996 American Standard J-bass w/stock pickups. But I have tested the '62 original pickups in the Geddy Lee J-bass and noticed that the '62 pickups were definitely more growly.

    So, I'm wondering if I would notice a change in Precision pickups.
     
  7. Max

    Max Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2000
    Bakersfield, CA
    I just got a mid 80's made in Japan P bass and put the 62 Fender pu in it. I've had a 95 MIA p bass, a 96 MIA p bass with EMG actives. I had a P bass special that I put seymour duncan quarter pounders in. And before I changed out this MIJ P and the P bass special they had the stock pus in them. Far and away, this 62 has the fattest bottom end. Peels the paint. This setup is a keeper.
     
  8. Would you say that the change in the tone is so noticable that it's worth shelling out the $xxx for new pickups?

    I've tried the pickups in a P-bass Special and I really noticed how dull they were (like rolling off a lot of tone from my P-bass).

    But I'm looking up and I don't want to waste money if the change isn't dramatic.
     
  9. Max

    Max Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2000
    Bakersfield, CA
    To me, the difference was worth it. There may be a couple of other factors I should mention. The body on this current bass feels a little heavier than my 96 USA. The fretboard is maple, not rosewood, and the pickups ride a little higher and are closer to the strings. I talked the sales guy at Guitar Center down to $50, so for me it was money well spent, and not too much.
     
  10. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    You think the '62 pickup is fatter than a Duncan Quarter Pounder? Can it cut through the mix like the Bassline pickup can?
     
  11. Now now, be nice.

    ::parental voice on::

    Don't make me come back there!!

    ::parental voice off::

    Rock on
    Eric
     
  12. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    Huh? I'm just trying to ask a couple of simple questions!
     
  13. Well, I noticed that sometimes my stock pickup is a bit trebly so I have to roll off the tone about half way. It's nice to be able to do that (which is why I don't like the Mark Hoppus bass).

    I was wondering how a '62 reissue would compare? Would it be as trebly? Would one of those SD quarter-pounder sound trebly because it is "hot"?
     
  14. Max

    Max Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2000
    Bakersfield, CA
    I will let you know after a gig on Saturday when I try it out. I did not like the Bassline pu for the bass I was getting because it was to be for an oldies group. It was too knarly. This 62 is deep, smooth, woodsy. And fat. Which brings to mind another thought about the words we use to describe tone. When I got the SD 1/4, my friend at GC said the tone would be "creamy." Which I took to be smooth. Like milk, but not the non-fat kind. The 1/4er was in fact to me, knarly, which I define as knarled or rough on the edges. In the dairy product context, I would say it sounds curdled. I do like the Mark Hoppus tone and he uses a 1/4 lber, but I was looking for deep boomy creamy sound.:D
     
  15. Oh, sorry. Fro some reason I read it as you trying to start an argument. Have re-read it, and see where you are coming from now. A thousand and 1 apologies, Sahib.:D

    Rock on
    Eric
     
  16. I've got a question thats pretty close to this thread, so I'll just ask it here instead of starting a new post. I've got a Squier Affinity P-Bass (which I'm really liking more, it really was my amp which gave me big problems, not my bass) and I'm considering either the '62s or the Duncan Quarter Pounders, and I was wondering if anyone had comments based on either (especially if any Squier P-Bass owners have some personal experiences) for general (alternative, hard, and classic) rock playing.
     
  17. Close enough. I've got the same setup, only with 2 added Vintage Js. That P is very punchy. I like it alot. Very good for that tight Green Day/early 90s punk sound

    Rock on
    Eric
     
  18. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    Apology accepted:)

    I am kinda partial towards the Quarter Pounder, though!

    Always looking for other opinions, however.
     
  19. PolkaHero

    PolkaHero Supporting Member

    Jan 5, 2002
    Michigan
    Hey Max, How'd that '62 sound Saturday night? Better than the Quarter Pounder? Thanks
     
  20. matteo6dmb

    matteo6dmb

    Sep 27, 2001
    Champaign, IL
    i have never been a fan of p-basses. even fenders/squiers. you guys can deal with that giant pickguard, the stiff feeling of a p-bass, the friggin strings falling out of their slots...and this is not just a description of one p-bass i've seen that was a junker. i've seen one or more of these traits on all p-basses i've seen. plus, they have a mass-manufactured look to them. by no means is fender/squier the only mass-manufacturing company out there, but other brands do a nice job of making you feel like you have a special, individual instrument. it might be an illusion, but it's got the feel. what do you guys like about the p-bass line? (i'm just wondering)