Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

have you seen the movie Rising Low?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by discoboo, Dec 25, 2002.


  1. discoboo

    discoboo

    Dec 25, 2002
    charleston, sc
    has anyone seen the Mike Gordon movie, "Rising Low?" it focuses on the music of Gov't Mule and the album they recorded following the death of Allen Woody, using 20+ different bassists to fill in. the best thing about the movie is that they all talk about the bass and how awesome it is to be a bass player. every time i watch it, i am filled with bass player pride, enthusiasm and inspiration. i really recommend it.
     
  2. 5stringDNA

    5stringDNA

    Oct 10, 2002
    Englewood, CO
    no, I'll look into it.
     
  3. boogiebass

    boogiebass

    Aug 16, 2000
    YES! I have the DVD. Awesome. I love the clips of Phil in the studio isolated in the booth and overdubbing his tracks! Wow. Everything else about the documentary is cool, too. I'm a major Mule fan and this movie is the bomb.
     
  4. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker Banned

    Jun 10, 2001
    WOW! Boogie, I have to agree with you:D This is a very good DVD. I too am a huge Mule fan. I don't really like the Deep End CD's, they're not very Mule like which they're not supposed to be, but Mule with Woody was something very special and that band will never be the same. The home video of woody is worth the price. I knew Woody a little and can say he was a great guy.
     
  5. boogiebass

    boogiebass

    Aug 16, 2000
    Cool, Pete.:)
     
  6. this....doesnt belong here.:cool:
     
  7. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    I agree with Peter Parker. I also had met Woody a few times and I thought this was a cool tribute to him. How many bands would do this for a departed member? Also shows that Warren and Matt are good people, too. I liked the DVD a lot...especially the Willie Weeks and Michele shots. Groove to the max goin' on there. Soulshine is one of my favorite tunes of all-time anyway.

    I didn't care much for the "Deep End" cds either, Peter. To me, the first cd is the quintessential Mule (the one you see at live shows), and they got less and less so with every new release.
     
  8. watspan

    watspan Supporting Member

    Nov 25, 2002
    madison, wi
    Nobody Kicks it like the Mule! Joey Arkenstat has been a major influence in my playing style. I've seen the Mule post-woody and they are still a major force. Unlike others, I love the Deep End CD's--they are definitely a departure from the previous works but have some great songs and performances--banks of the deep end, beautifully broken, tear me down, catfish blues are among my favorites. the mule also perform "time to confess" on the bonnaroo dvd
     
  9. NJL

    NJL

    Apr 12, 2002
    San Antonio
    Joey Arkenstat has been and still is the bomb. I remember in 76' the albums he recorded with Rel Lish and Austin Houston....awsome...they did a little thing on him on PBS in the early eighties and as always he played these hardcore lines and it looked like his hands were barely moving.
     
  10. boogiebass

    boogiebass

    Aug 16, 2000
    Another very cool DVD. Great variety and some killer performances. I really dig WP on that one although it's sad to see Mikey so ill.
     
  11. watspan

    watspan Supporting Member

    Nov 25, 2002
    madison, wi
    bonnaroo dvd--WSP's Tallboy is mighty soulful; I was totally blown away by buckethead playing w/ Les Claypool and Bernie Worrel; also dug Karl Denson, Galactic's wild drummer and the North Mississippi All-stars; From a bassist's perspective, watching edgar myer on the upright was incredible!
     
  12. Woodchuck

    Woodchuck

    Apr 21, 2000
    Atlanta / Macon (sigh)
    Gallien Krueger for the last 12 years!
    Whoa! I didn't know it was out. Consider it bought!
     
  13. boogiebass

    boogiebass

    Aug 16, 2000
    Word.
     
  14. watspan

    watspan Supporting Member

    Nov 25, 2002
    madison, wi
    this points out an interesting problem for musicians: the fans always want to hear what they are used to or familiar with and want to hear it just like it is on the cd. As a musician though, you have often developed or evolved beyond where you were at when you recorded. From what i can see, the Mule were interesting in that seem to have worked up the material in a live setting first before going into the recording studio (i think the allman bros. do something similar)

    I kinda backed into the Mule--I first was exposed to warren and woody thru the ABB, then bought the Deep end, then worked my way backwards thru the Mules collection!
     
  15. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    Sounds pretty cool.

    Wrong forum, though. Moved.
     
  16. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    Yeah, this is true in many situations, although not mine. The things I loved about the Mule when they first got together...heaviness, the way they could go from sheer bombast to very subtle in a blink of an eye...all kind of faded a bit after a few albums. They did indeed work out most of the stuff live before recording it, and I was fortunate enough to see many of their tunes go through several iterations. It was really cool...made you feel like a part of the thing. I remember seeing them play things like "Blind Man In The Dark" even before the first cd was released. I was hip to the way the tunes evolved, just not the way their style has evolved. I miss the jackhammer, trio Mule...'course Woody was a major part of that, and it's gone forever.
     
  17. discoboo

    discoboo

    Dec 25, 2002
    charleston, sc
    DOH!!! sorry for posting this in the wrong forum. i'm new to this world. will try better next time.