Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Help identifying bass

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Adrian Cho, Aug 10, 2005.


  1. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    I did post about this bass when I bought it a couple of years ago but I didn't have very good pics then and there weren't many ideas about the origin. I recently (finally) got around to taking some new pics which are posted here (you can ignore the first three photos which are pics of the AMT mic tailpiece mount).

    This bass was supposedly made in Italy by an unknown maker in the late 1960s or early 1970s. It would be nice to know who the maker is. Apparently the bass was imported into the US by the Kolstein shop in New York City and was in the possession of a family in upstate New York before it was imported into Canada. I did e-mail Barrie about it a long time ago but never heard back from him but I've tried again recently.

    I am quite sure that the bass is somewhat younger - made perhaps in the 1980s and others including Bill Merchant and my local luthier agree with me. Bill thinks there is no reason to doubt its Italian heritage. It is certainly made in an Italian style. I think it was intended as a copy of a bass made by Giovanni Paolo Maggini although the shoulder are just slightly more sloped. The double purfling of course is a classic Maggini trademark. You can check out two similar Maggini copies by Kolstein and Gabute.

    If you have any ideas, I'd be interested to know.

    More info: I should add that the tuners were retrofitted by the guy that sold it to me. The tailpiece was something I put on. The extension is Bill Merchant's.

    Thanks

    Adrian
     
  2. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    Thanks Ken. You're right that regardless of the origin, it is a nice bass. Bill Merchant was very impressed with what I paid for it and said he had a friend who had recently bought a modern Italian bass in Cremona and that he had paid a lot more for it and he thought the insturments were comparable.
     
  3. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    Ken, it's interesting that you think my bass is antiqued. I don't think the maker made any attempt to make it look any older than it is. The finish is quite "plain" and new-looking although it's a nice varnish and certainly not some factory job. I find the varnish very transparent with quite a matte finish - very unlike the thicker, harder, glossier stuff on my previous bass - a factory German. I have played some of the Kolstein copies like the Fendt model and I am not sure what to make of that antiquing - it doesn't really do it for me.
     
  4. Tbeers

    Tbeers

    Mar 27, 2005
    Chicago, IL
    Wow, what a stunning instrument! Like Ken said, who cares where it came from? That bass is beautiful... hold onto it!

    It looks like your bridge is tilting upward though... something about that looks funny, I can't be sure what.
     
  5. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    Yes when I was looking at those photos it looked to me like the bridge was tilted up a bit too much. I have been installing a lot of new strings lately and so I'll have to reset it tonight.