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Help need creative ideas to save a neck

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by tjclem, Jan 20, 2005.


  1. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    :help: I was planing the front of the neck down and I got a chip in the Wenge fingerboard. :crying: :bawl: Anybody have a good idea to stop me from trashing the neck. It is a 9 piece laminated neck that fits a body I have made nicely. Help!!
     
  2. Scott French

    Scott French Dude Supporting Member

    May 12, 2004
    Grass Valley, CA
    Glue in a piece of grain matching wenge?
     
  3. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Thanks is that what you would do? I guess I would have to cut the piece "above" the nut cleanly then glue a whole piece in?
     
  4. HamOnTheCob

    HamOnTheCob Jacob Moore Supporting Member

    Nov 21, 2004
    Cambridge, Ohio, USA
    Endorsing Artist for Warwick Basses, Mesa Engineering, Joyo Technology, Dr. J Pedals, and Levy's Leathers
    Although this isn't the point...

    I don't think it's that bad. With a nut on there and with it strung, it shouldn't be easily noticed. I wouldn't personally worry about it.

    But if there's no way you can let it go, I agree that the best thing would be a well-matched piece of wenge glued in place.
     
  5. schuyler

    schuyler

    Aug 5, 2003
    Atlanta, GA
    how about pare the remaining section down flat and glue a piece of wood on top? since this is behind the nut, it shouldn't have any structural effect. or give the broken section a radius like a fingerboard?

    you don't mention if you have the chip that came out... if i had the chip, i'd just glue it back on with CA glue. having dealt with this occurence on many non-bass projects, i've learned to always find and keep chips so i can put them back in place, even if it means 10 minutes of digging around on the floor.
     
  6. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    No I don't have the chip. :rollno: I guess I should just remove the rest ofit and lay ina piece of wenge. Or should I remove it and replace that piece with a piece of black Ebony to try and make it look intentional? :D
     
  7. M.R. Ogle

    M.R. Ogle Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 5, 2004
    Mount Vernon, Illinois
    Backstage Guitar Lab owner
    Yeah... take that whole area down flat and glue on another piece of Wenge. It's not structural... you'll be the only person who even knows there was something amiss. Heck, all luthiers look at their own instruments and first see the flaws.. even if nobody else sees them.
     
  8. Cerb

    Cerb

    Sep 27, 2004
    Indiana
    I'm actually about to make a wenge fingerboard and I'm a bit worried about it chipping. It is pretty nasty stuff to work with?
     
  9. paintandsk8

    paintandsk8 Pushin' my soul through the wire...

    May 12, 2003
    West Lafayette, IN
    If i were you, I would just flatten down that whole section, and make a big nut, out of ebony or something and epoxy it on there. By no means trash the neck, I'm sure someone that is less of a perfectionist around here would buy it. ;)
     
  10. Scott French

    Scott French Dude Supporting Member

    May 12, 2004
    Grass Valley, CA
    I would just sand the area with the chip flat (not everything behind the nut) and glue a piece that matches. Wenge is dark and the grain is regular enough that if you match it well no one will see it, even you.
     
  11. budman

    budman Commercial User

    Oct 7, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Formerly the owner/builder of LeCompte Electric Bass
    I would cut the nut slot a little deeper just shy of where it meets the fingerboard and remove all the wenge on the headstock side of the nut down to the depth of the nut slot. Then glue a contrasting piece of wood in there all the way up to the fret side of the nut slot. Then shape it to match the fingerboard and then cut a new nut slot. The wenge that you left under the contrasting piece will look like a neat little pin stripe all the way around.
     
  12. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    A few good ideas. Scott don't you think it would be easier to replace the whole area vs. trying to get a solid 90deg. cut on the broken piece then gluing another piece in?.............t
     
  13. Scott French

    Scott French Dude Supporting Member

    May 12, 2004
    Grass Valley, CA
    Depends on what you're more comfortable with. That's just what I would personally do and have done with small chips before. If you're more comfortable taking down the whole area then go for it. For me it would be more work.
     
  14. I probably wouldn't "cut" it per se. My approach would be to jig it up flat and rout off the piece from the front of the existing nut slot all the way back. That way I would get a perfect 90º from the fretboard to the neck. Then I would make either a matching wenge or an ebony "full" nut that would cap the end of the fretboard.

    But I like Budmans idea of leaving a little line around the bottom.
     
  15. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    What you are suggesting is remove the part that is not chipped? and replacing the whole thing?
     
  16. If that question is directed at me - Yes!
     
  17. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    yes I was...Mr.Bone....Thanks ...t
     
  18. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Well I replaced the chipped area. I think it will work just fine thanks all.........t
     
  19. HamOnTheCob

    HamOnTheCob Jacob Moore Supporting Member

    Nov 21, 2004
    Cambridge, Ohio, USA
    Endorsing Artist for Warwick Basses, Mesa Engineering, Joyo Technology, Dr. J Pedals, and Levy's Leathers
    Can we see a pic? Curious to see how it worked out. I bet with the strings on we can't even tell anything has been repaired!

    Jake
     
  20. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    here is a pic With the nut in and string on it should be cool.t