Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

help w/ pickup choice

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by iplay4-5, Jun 10, 2005.


  1. iplay4-5

    iplay4-5 Guest

    Feb 4, 2004
    rockford, IL
    hey everyone i need help on choicing from 45 cs and bart 45 shape soapbars i know the diffrence between the 2 emg=moderan-clean tone bart=classic growl-punch but i've heard that barts in a dark sounding bass aren't good but that emgs freq responces arent good at all the bass i'm building has a black korina body (mahagony sound as i hear) a wenge/bubinga neck i would think it would sound dark but what mix would cut and sound that would most fit a heavy rock/ metal band???? thanxz alot everyone :help: :bassist: peace n love from the bassist i'd love everyones input to
     
  2. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE

    FWIW:

    In my experience, and the concensus from the hashing out we did in luthiers forum over tone, the body makes little difference in tone. Acoustic tone of the bass is in the neck/neck construction and that cannot be controlled with any accuracy of significance. So you'll know what a neck and the body it's attached to will sound like when it's done.

    However, if you happen to be into wood theory and the bass is going to be dark then that leaves pups.

    Those particular Barts I don't know about. I had a set of M34C's that were TOTALLY uselessly dark. But even those I ran across a combo in time with a harness, caps, wiring, and switching that made for pretty decent tone. And if those were salvageable, I can't imagine a pup that wouldn't be simply based on being too dark.

    Never had those EMG's either but I can't say I've ever heard it said that the frequency response of EMG's wasn't good either, and that sure hasn't been my experience overall. Although I can't say I was found of the JV's and HZ35's, the active J's and P's have very good frequency spread, response, and actually can have a noticeably passive quality to tone depending on how they're ran.

    I've had LOTS of all kinds of Barts and they can vary a LOT. But I do 4's only so don't know squat about 5's with few exception.

    Probably doesn't help much but it is some input to your questions.
     
  3. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    No offense, but you can't be serious. I was trying out basses a local luthier built, and he had like 5 or 6 different neck-thru-body basses he made with 3 different body woods. Everything else was identical, same neck woods, same pickups, bridge, nut, tuners, and finish. The only ones that sounded the same were the ones that had the same woods. And all the basses reflected the sound usually associated with the woods they used, i.e. maple bodies sounded brighter than mahogany bodies.

    And even with Fenders...alder bodies have a decidedly different sound with its own set of characteristics than ash bodies. It's true that no two basses sound identical, but they sure do sound extremely similar based on the woods used. That can't be all related to the neck. The neck probably has more bearing on the tone, but make no mistake that the body does make a difference, and a sizable one at that.
     
  4. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    yeh, I'm serious. We started this before in another thread and you didn't respond to my post. Anyway, I'll email you (or you can email me at Luknfur@aol.com) so as not to burn up space here.

    You don't have an email tag off your screen so you'll have to email me. But there are preveious posts where this hashed in the luthier forum - and that was the concensus there.
     
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups