Help!!! What Book To Buy.....

Discussion in 'Music [DB]' started by Nuno A., Jul 10, 2001.

  1. Nuno A.

    Nuno A. Velvet Strings Customer Service

    Jul 9, 2001
    I would like to know what books to buy to teach me music theory and upright bass tecniques.
    More and more i realize the importance of a solid music theory and i would like to buy books who could help me on that task since i dont have nobody around who could help me...
    i would like to start from the beggining to correct eventual mistakes and to put me on the right track.
    Advices are really welcome.
    All the best.

  2. dhosek


    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    Bass technique: Simandl. There is no substitute.

    Theory-wise, it all depends what you're looking to do. Rufus Reid's evolving bassist book is good, although it seems a bit limited to me (I bought it mostly for the duets at the back of the book).

  3. Books are OK, but are no substitute for a GOOD teacher. A GOOD teacher will be able to help you in ways no book ever can. Get a GOOD teacher - who will then most probably advise you to get a copy of Simandl (which by then you'll already have, right? ;> ) and you'll be all set...

    Good Luck!

    - Wil
  4. rablack


    Mar 9, 2000
    Houston, Texas
    I agree with Mr. Davis. There is no substitute for a real live teacher. I checked your profile - surely in the south of Switzerland there is a bass teacher. Even if you want to play jazz you will benefit from lessons from a classical player. You will save yourself a lot of time, frustration and injury with a teacher. Good luck.

    Oh, and check out to learn more
  5. Nuno A.

    Nuno A. Velvet Strings Customer Service

    Jul 9, 2001

  6. Pete G

    Pete G

    Dec 31, 2001
    Northern Virginia
    How far are you from Zurich? There are some great bass players, some of whom probably teach, in the Suisse Romande orchestra.
  7. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Hang with a bass teacher for technique, but I would avoid them for theory. Find a teacher that plays piano (and you should, too). Eventually you might want to hang out with a horn player that teaches (for melodic studies). Pianists and horn players tend to have theory way more together than your average bass player, and further, these are the folks that you'll have to play with and so they can show you what is expected from the bass player. In short, you're going straight 'to the source' for the information.

    As far as bass technique, I would suggest spending time with a classical teacher as well as a jazz player. There are some distinct differences in the approaches, particularly in the right hand. Overall, though, I would take the pianist as your main teacher and get more occasional lessons from the bass player...
  8. I recommend the book "Harmony in Western Music" by Richard Franko Goldman. Each chapter gives great examples of different master's use of harmony.
  9. My Teacher has me in "Simandl" and for Theory "Edly`s Music Theory for Practical People". The Theory book has gotten good marks from many Teachers. Its written to be kinda funny and directed to all ages. You can order it at Good luck


    If the world didn`t suck we would all fall off....
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Interesting advice from a bassplayer - like turkeys voting for Thanksgiving! (we would say Christmas here) ;)

    I do agree though - I have learnt a lot more about theory from my regular Jazz classes which are taught by an Alto Sax player who used to be a drummer, than from any other bass players - apart from on TalkBass that is!! ;)

    This tutor is of course able to play piano and I often find that I don't get things until I've played them on the piano - well I use a keyboard that has a nice sampled piano sound. ;)