Help with 4 ohm 4 Speaker Wiring

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Ponyack, May 24, 2018.


  1. Ponyack

    Ponyack

    May 3, 2018
    Raleigh, NC
  2. Wasnex

    Wasnex

    Dec 25, 2011
    Do you have 16 ohm speakers. The diagram shows all speakers connected in parallel. (All + to +) (All - to -)

    Four 16 ohm speakers in parallel will give you 4 ohms.

    I think the images below will make more sense.

    184SV.png
     
    Old Garage-Bander and Munjibunga like this.
  3. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    What speakers do you have (impedance) and what are you trying to accomplish?
     
  4. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    BTW, that's a terrible diagram. The ones @Wasnex posted should help.
     
  5. Ponyack

    Ponyack

    May 3, 2018
    Raleigh, NC
    They are eminance 200w 4ohm speakers. I am trying to wire them parrell...unless someone has a better suggestion as this is the first time I am trying to do something like this.
     
  6. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Retired Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    If you wire them in parallel you will have a one-ohm load which will render the life expectancy of pretty much any commercial amp to about 30 seconds. Series-parallel wiring will give you a 4-ohm load.
     
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  7. Wasnex

    Wasnex

    Dec 25, 2011
    To work out the impedance of multiple speakers connected in series simply add. For example, if you connected all four of your 4 ohm speakers in series. 4+4+4+4=16 ohms.

    To work out impedance of multiple speakers connected in parallel. If all speakers have the same impedance, divide the impedance of one speaker by the number of speakers. For example, the math for two 8 ohm speakers connected in parallel is: 8/2=4 ohms.

    It gets more complicated when the speakers have different impedances: I.E. one 8 ohm speaker and one 4 ohm speaker. Use the following formula where Z1 is the impedance of the first speaker and Z2 is the impedance of the second speaker.
    upload_2017-12-27_3-14-46-png.png


    upload_2017-12-27_3-24-31-png.png
    The formula works for however many speakers you connect in parallel. Just continue the same pattern in the denominator.

    With series parallel, work out the impedance of the two series circuits first; then work out the parallel impedance.

    Here's the math with your 4 ohm drivers:
    4+4 = 8 ohms, so each of the two series circuits is 8 ohms. These are wired in parallel so 8/2 = 4 ohms.

    Hope this makes sense.
     
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  8. If you are using four speakers, and each one is 4 Ohms, you can make the whole cab come out to 4 Ohms by using the Series/Parallel (bottom) diagram that @Wasnex gave you in post #2.
     
    Ponyack likes this.
  9. Ponyack

    Ponyack

    May 3, 2018
    Raleigh, NC
    Thanks! I really appreciate the info and insight. I'll have at this weekend and see if I can get this cabinet working again.
     
  10. BassmanPaul

    BassmanPaul Inactive

    Hate to rain on your parade but did you ensure that the drivers you bought will actually be happy in the size of your existing box and it’s porting if any?
     
  11. agedhorse

    agedhorse Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 12, 2006
    Davis, CA (USA)
    Development Engineer-Mesa, Product Support-Genz Benz
    Yet another reminder of why we try to design better and better protection circuits in amplifiers...
     
  12. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jun 19, 2021

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