1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Help with British honey substitute

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Batmensch, Oct 6, 2013.


  1. I was born in Ireland and moved to the states 50+ years ago, and my parents, when they could, would get foodstuffs that they used to eat In Ireland. One thing we used to get all the time was this honey like stuff. Same basic appearance as honey except it was more yellow than gold in color, had the same consistency as honey, and could be used as a substitute, but it tasted nothing like honey, it was just as sweet but had it's own unique flavor. It used to come in a can with a pop off lid, (and later a regular glass jar, IIRC) with a green label and a white logo of a sleeping lion being buzzed by a bunch of flies. There was a slogan on there somewhere, but I forget what it was. I was hoping some one of our British TB members can remind me of the brand name (and the slogan, if possible) and if it's still being made.
    I loved this stuff as a kid, I used to eat it by the spoonful right out of the can. It was like liquid candy to me.
     
  2. Tituscrow

    Tituscrow Banned

    Feb 14, 2011
    NW England
    That sounds like lemon curd?
     
  3. UncleFluffy

    UncleFluffy

    Mar 8, 2009
    California
    Head Tinkerer, The Flufflab
  4. Tituscrow

    Tituscrow Banned

    Feb 14, 2011
    NW England
    Of course! My little girl had the damn stuff on her Ready Brek this morning!

    ImageUploadedByTalkBass1381095170.150491.
     
  5. Yup, that's the stuff! (and the can, and the slogan!)
    Gorgeous, thanks.
    It's been years since I've had this, don't know what made me think of it today.
     
  6. GrumpiusMaximus

    GrumpiusMaximus I've Seen Things You People Wouldn't Believe

    Mar 11, 2013
    Kent, United Kingdom
    That's the stuff.

    Drizzle it on pancakes or porridge for that special kind of unhealthiness that you crave.
     
  7. Talkbass, more knowledgeable than google since 1999.

    lowsound
     
  8. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    I checked it out on Wikipedia. It looks like an early version of high fructose corn syrup, but made from sugar cane or beets rather than corn.

    Learn something new every day.
     
  9. UncleFluffy

    UncleFluffy

    Mar 8, 2009
    California
    Head Tinkerer, The Flufflab
    It's invert sugar. For homebrewing purposes you can make an equivalent with regular sugar, water, and citric acid. Probably no good for breakfast though.
     
  10. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    From the title, I was thinking it was some kind of marital aid...
     
  11. "Golden Syrup" must be generic, same tin can, different label here.
     
  12. Egads, the logo is a dead lion rotting in the sun, oozing "sweetness", attracting flies. Crafty sales ploy! :eyebrow:
     
  13. elgecko

    elgecko

    Apr 30, 2007
    Anasleim, CA
    Hey, is that the actual Tituscrow?

    :ninja:
     
  14. Story of Sampson in the bible, he takes honey from a hive that was in a dead lion. Also, likely where the slogan came from.

    lowsound
     
  15. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    Yup, a mixture of glucose and fructose. Sucrose consists of molecules of glucose and fructose joined together. They get broken apart in your stomach, so they can pass into your bloodstream. High fructose corn syrup is the same mixture, but produced from starch. This is why, at first glance, sugar and HFCS should be nutritionally identical. If or why they aren't is a matter of controversy and perhaps interesting science.

    The golden syrup probably contains some other compounds such as complex sugars and residues that contribute to the flavor, just like the flavor of beer is influenced by the stuff that the yeast can't ferment.
     
  16. MakiSupaStar

    MakiSupaStar The Lowdown Diggler

    Apr 12, 2006
    Huntington Beach, CA
    My guess would have been Lyle's or some kind of treacle. Looks like it was Lyles.
     
  17. Are you kidding me? This stuff is excellent for breakfast! I've used it instead of sugar in tea and coffee, on pancakes and waffles, even on peanut butter sandwiches! Anything you can use honey for, you can use this stuff. Screw homebrewing.
     
  18. UncleFluffy

    UncleFluffy

    Mar 8, 2009
    California
    Head Tinkerer, The Flufflab
    Oh yes. I was just trying to say that the DIY invert sugar is no good for breakfast. The real thing is superb stirred into your oatmeal.
     
  19. OP's childhood memory thoroughly busted then.

    Iirc Americans call a scone a biscuit. What do you put on your biscuits then? Scones have butter and jam, with cream if you are flash, or butter and golden syrup.
     
  20. Gopherbassist

    Gopherbassist

    Jan 19, 2008
    Not really. Biscuits are usually softer and moister than scones. Scones are more brittle and crumbly. Also, I've never known scones to be flavored with butter before baking, as biscuits sometimes are. Scones also seem to take sweet condiments more readily, something about the difference in their flavor limits biscuits more to jelly, jam or honey, where scones seem to do well with syrups and frosting as well, making them more ideal for breakfast. Biscuits also don't take well to having fruit baked into them, such as cranberries and blueberries, or even poppy seeds, but again the flavor difference allows this to be perfectly fine with a scone.
     

Share This Page