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Help with Speaker Box

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Pantsman, May 6, 2006.


  1. I'm currently designing a single 12" box for practise at home, mainly because decent practise amps here are stupid expensive. I found a nice 12" woofer for $50 brand new and I have all the woodworking skills and tools I need. But I ran the specs through WinISD and I was wondering if it looks good for a bass cabinet. I've heard flat response is good and thats what I've got. The box is tuned to 33.7Hz and has a volume of 312L or 110cmx68cmx41cm and is ported.

    I know its a bit big but it wont get moved or anything its just gunna sit at home for practise use, i'll be powering it with an old hifi amp.

    Thanks for the advice.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    For your stereo yes, for your bass no.
    That's about an octave lower than it needs to be.
     
  3. Its great to have you post here Bill!

    So what would be a more appropriate tuning freq 40Hz?

    and I've heard a few members, tom bowlus i remember the most saying that flat response was desirable, can you explain why or why not please?

    Thanks for your help.

    Edit: I'm very interesting in your box designs as well, i've been considering building one, but its hard for me to get ahold of the reccomended drivers, how sensitive are these boxes to a change in driver?

    Edit Edit: Your probably very busy, a point to somewhere i can read for myself some box desgin stuff would be great.
     
  4. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    Note that I am still learning at the feet of the real speaker gurus on this site. But I have noticed that there are two separate schools of thought on bass speaker response. Thus I will try to advocate both sides fairly before choosing which side I am on:

    "Flat" response is what it is, but results in big cabinets with low sensitivity. A lot of players comment that a flat speaker lets them have the same tone in the studio and on stage, and what they hear is representative of what is coming out of the PA. Plus some players just like the sound.

    "Classic" response consists of tunings that can go as high as 80 Hz. My little GK MB150 combo is in this category, and lots of players are happy with it. The speaker does not reproduce the fundamental at full amplitude, but the fundamental is not necessarily the most important part of the bass tone.

    How do you choose? I suggest that if you have an existing speaker that you are happy with, try to figure out its response curve. Measure it if possible. My personal website (click my sig) has a free spectrum analyzer software for Windows.

    While your ears are the ultimate judge, the measurement will help you predict what kind of design will please your ears. I am fairly certain that I am in the "classic" school. In my case, I don't care about what I sound like in the studio, and typically play without PA support. A "classic" speaker gets me the volume that I need in a relatively small box.
     
  5. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
    Take a look at BGavin's spread sheet of designs for bass cabinets at www.ofgb.org.

    Another idea would be to see if your woofer would work well in one of Bill Fitzmaurice's designs. http://www.billfitzmaurice.com/
     
  6. Neither of those links work for me BillyB_from_LZ, although i've already had a good look at Bill's site and i have it bookmarked. I think i'm just going to take fdecks' approach and build this cabinet and see if i like the sound or not, it should be loud enough even at such a low tuning freq, winISD gives it a sensitivity of 97dB which will be enough for practising at home with a 85watt amp.
     
  7. fdeck

    fdeck Supporting Member Commercial User

    Mar 20, 2004
    Madison WI
    HPF Technology LLC
    Thanks for bringing it back. It's a really helpful reference.
     
  8. Thanks for the info guys, i think i'll just do some trial and error, build this box then move the driver into a different box and see what i like best.

    Thanks everyone :) :bassist:
     
  9. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    Desirable maybe, but for the most part within the genre of bass cabs it doesn't exist. That's for two reasons. One is that getting flat response requires a very large box, the other is that extending response lower is done at the cost of broadband sensitivity. Putting a driver(s) in a smaller box gives a humped response in the second octave, 80 to 160 Hz roughly, and higher sensitivity in that octave gives the perception of both deep bass and power.
     
  10. I can bang out a reflex box fairly quickly, but I'd hate to spend even a modest amount of work and get merde for results.

    Do a bit of homework and your box will be spot-on the first time.

    My spread sheet offers more than enough information to make an informed decision about your driver/cab combination. I have more than 1100 drivers cataloged, and all the math is worked out. Performance data is also there for the more popular drivers aimed at bass players.
     
  11. BillyB_from_LZ

    BillyB_from_LZ Supporting Member

    Sep 7, 2000
    Chicago
  12. tombowlus

    tombowlus If it sounds good, it is good Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    Fremont, Ohio
    Editor-in-Chief, Bass Gear Magazine
    I'm sure that it is a matter of personal preference, but I find that a tonally balanced signal is more pleasing to my ears than one with marked peaks or valleys. I am kind of a "no compromise" guy, in that I want to sound good (to me) by myself AND in a mix, I want to sound good (to me) at low volumes AND at high volumes, I want a full tone, but I also want excellent clarity, I want deep lows, but I want them to be tight.

    So far, I have had the best luck with pursuing my tone using gear that is closer to "flat" than to "colored." There is some "colored" gear that I like, but normally, they fall into the category of "mild coloration" (think Epifani), or at the minimum, the coloration does not obscure the otherwise relatively balanced performance of the cab (think EA Wizzy or Bergantino NV61).

    The closest thing to "flat" that that I have played are the IP-series cabs from Bergantino. Anyone who thinks that "flat" sounds lifeless, dull, sterile or unexciting, needs to hear these cabs. They are vibrant and exciting, and just flat out stunning. That said, they are not "flat" to 20 Hz or anything close to it. You need to pick a reasonable limit for your lower frequency extension. Otherwise, you'll be wasting a lot of energy on shaking the wall fixtures, ceiling tiles, etc. and not on making music.

    Tom.
     

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