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Help with stamina, energy and accuracy

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by LordIgoor12, Dec 3, 2017.


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  1. LordIgoor12

    LordIgoor12

    Sep 6, 2017
    Somewhere
    Hello guys. I have issues with energy and stamina. When I play a fast line like a scale of 16th notes in 140 bpm for some seconds both of my HANDS get tired and have a small pain (specially on the left hand thumb); I am not sure if this is the way I position my left hand or how much tension I use on it; Even playing a bassline for some minutes can be really tiring. I need to know what I may be doing wrong and what should I do to my left and right hand. Please give me as much explanations as possible. Thanks guys! (by the way, I pluck with my right hand and fret with my left hand)
     
  2. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    the Cali Intergalctic Mind Space
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    Is this a new thing?
     
  3. Most of the time things like you described deal with wrist angle and/or string set up. With out seeing what you do I'm not going to be able to help much more than that.
     
  4. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    Do you dive straight into fast playing right from the get go ? If so, then spend a few minutes doing some gentle stretches before you even touch the bass. Search Youtube for ..."hand stretches for guitar/bass". Then after that, SLOWLY play some scales or arpeggios above the fifth fret (any lower may be too much of a stretch when you have not yet warmed up) for another two or three minutes. The fact that you quote your left hand thumb as being painful is ominous. More than likely you are pressing too hard. Every now and then, try playing without the thumb on the back of the neck for a couple of minutes. This will act as a reminder of just how little is the pressure required to fret.

    To sum up (without having actually seen you play). My guess is that your hands are not relaxed when you play, along with the possibility that you are not warming up properly. Your technique could be a factor too.
     
  5. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    the Cali Intergalctic Mind Space
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    Have you had your bass setup recently?

    I like narrow necks with low action so I can keep my wrist straight and my thumb wrapped around the neck. I also play with the lightest touch possible or a pick and turn up the amp. No "digging in" for me. Never a pain problem even after a few decades.
     
    fearceol likes this.
  6. brlottermann

    brlottermann

    May 14, 2011
    Boston, MA
    Stamina is built up through practice, so I'd recommend working up to the high tempo of 140 sixteenth notes and really practice consistency at a slower tempo. This will help you find the technique that is most comfortable for you and then you can apply this to faster tempos. Also its important to have your bass set up well, so string height is not too high as that can make your left hand tire out faster. Hope this helps!
     
  7. LordIgoor12

    LordIgoor12

    Sep 6, 2017
    Somewhere
    Wow so many replies here.
    Ok so here is a checklist here of things so far:
    Stretch yourself (tick)
    SLOW TEMPO FIRST FAST TEMPO LATER (tick)
    Properly set-up bass (yeah it's fine, I think)
    Stop plucking so hard
    Stop slapping so hard
    Stop picking so hard
    Stop forcing "so hard" things so hard
    Relax your wrists, arms, thumb and hands.
    Thanks guys for the huge help. Even though I haven't tried it because I just checked it and I'm too bored to do it today but Thanks anyways guys! Hope it works, cause it could get worse!
    I will post results of it tomorrow
     
  8. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin Banned

    Dec 11, 1999
    Check the action on your bass and the string tension. Lighten up, let the amp provide the volume. Lower your action and use a lighter touch. Try low tension strings such as TI Jazz Rounds
     
  9. LordIgoor12

    LordIgoor12

    Sep 6, 2017
    Somewhere
    Oh yeah, string tension.
    I use a 34 inch scale bass, roundwound 0.40's at Standard Tuning. I think my first strings were 0.45's, but they were as fine to play as this current set is. I usually play my bass unplugged, that must be a indirect reason to why I tire out easily.
    By the way guys, Yes it's working out amazingly well.
     
  10. fearceol

    fearceol

    Nov 14, 2006
    Ireland
    What about the ACTION ?...i.e. how far the strings are away from the fretboard ?
     
  11. LordIgoor12

    LordIgoor12

    Sep 6, 2017
    Somewhere
    The action is not too low and not too high, it's fine for me. In the future I may try a lower action but for now it's fine.
     
  12. Mushroo

    Mushroo Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    Massachusetts, USA
    1. Plug in your bass, turn up your amp, and play with a lighter touch. :)

    2. Pain in the left thumb is usually caused by a "lobster claw" or "death grip" technique. Your thumb should just very lightly graze the back of the neck, as a reference point and pivot. Never use your thumb in a "squeezing" or "pinching" motion to apply fretting force. Make sure the palm of your left hand is smooth and flat. The worst thing you can do for your left thumb is to compress your "life line" into a deep groove. Don't make the palm of your left hand look like "butt cheeks!"
     
    lz4005 likes this.
  13. turbo2256b

    turbo2256b

    Jan 4, 2011
    At my age wish I could wake up one morning were hands didnt feel swollen 2 to 4 of my pinky fingers weren't numb
     
  14. Mike Dimin

    Mike Dimin Banned

    Dec 11, 1999
    If you're having issues with pain and fatigue then your action certainly be an issue
     

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