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Help with wiring and routing !

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by MAD2X, Oct 13, 2005.


  1. I just got my EMG-J set for my bass, it comes prewired with a Fender style input jack. My bass has a Ibanez style input. I'm not sure if it stays the same as before and just adding the batterie wire on the empty tab. Or if it's the opposite, there is one white and one black wire on my input already, same colors as the EMG one. I noticed there is 3 different lenght of tabs on mine, if someone could tell me what they all do it would be really appreciated.

    Also both pickups dont fit in the cavities on my bass, they almost do but the bumps where the screws go are a bit wider on the emg's, I was wondering what ppl usually do to get them to fit. Should I strip everything on the bass and use a router? Or could I just use a my dremel and sand where needed?

    Any other tip or things I should know before I get started?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. for the pickup cavities...take the strings off...take out the old pickups...mask off your bass, to protect it...mark with pencil where you need to be...use your dremel and take it slow and easy...if it's just the "ears"...it shouldn't take you but about 45min to an hour...

    for the jack...your emg's are active...

    the three tabs are a stereo jack...
    -the ring (closest the the outside) is a ground...

    -the middle tab is a ground for your electronics (the plug in the jack becomes the "switch")...

    -the end tab (or "tip" as it is referred to) is the signal from your electronics...

    you'll need to get an ibanez style stereo jack to make this thing work...
     
  3. Thanks for the info, I think that my "Ibanez Style Input" is already Stereo since it's got 3 tabs wich are all different lenght, but all in the center, so I dont know wich one is for what....
     
  4. Hookus

    Hookus

    Oct 2, 2005
    Austin, TX
    Don't take a router to a finished bass that you like.

    Unless you want to make it a finished bass that you don't like.
     
  5. get an ohm meter...an absolutely indispensible tool for doing ANY wiring job....they're like $10 at radio shack...

    a quick check will easily determine what connection goes to what "ear"...
     
  6. I got a response from EMG. I'll post the answer, it might be good for reference. On the barrel time input, the shortest is the hot (usually white), the longuest the ground (usually black) and the medium is where the battery black wire goes to. I just used my dremel to do the job and it worked out really well.
     
  7. chrisp2u

    chrisp2u

    Aug 15, 2005
    Buffalo, NY
    Uh oh... that sounds like there's a possible story behind that.

    I'd have to say that I haven't found that to be the case in my personal experience. If you take your time and do it right there should be no problems. I just got done re-routing a bass that I just bought used which was poorly routed the previously-- it was uneven and none of the routes were even close to straight.

    Luckily they at least didn't route it too wide so I could re-reoute and clean up the lines. Now it looks great with no damage/side-effects. YMMV depending on the type of finish I guess and patience and/or skill with power tools.
    ---
    Chris
     
  8. jwymore

    jwymore

    Jul 26, 2001
    Portland, OR
    Not worth it for a single project but I love my little Dremel router. It's great for these types of jobs.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. you can make a crude, but effective one out of some plywood and some wood blocks and hose clamps...

    the plywood with a hole in it as the base...the blocks of wood with the hose clamps attached as the guide...

    depth adjustment is done by the hose clamps...hence, it must be set up for each use and it won't "plunge"...

    but you can make it from some scrap bits in about an hour...

    definitely not heavy-duty, but good for precision work as it basically acts as a steadying hand.